Survey finds charity trustees are quitting as a result of mounting pressure

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1st November 2016 15:37 - Voluntary

Survey finds charity trustees are quitting as a result of mounting pressure: According to the National Trustee Survey, which was conducted by Third Sector, in excess of 25 per cent of charity trustees have considered leaving their role because of the pressure of the job.Survey finds charity trustees are quitting as a result of mounting pressure

Conducted in September and October, the survey revealed that 71 per cent of charity board members believed that the responsibilities of charity trustees were increasing and a further 23 per cent said that the pressure was becoming too much.

When the trustees were asked whether they had considered resigning from their role because of the increasing pressure, 27 per cent either agreed or strongly agreed that they had.

Third Sector partnered with the charity leaders body, Acevo, and the governance programme, Charity Futures, to reveal that of those who were involved in recruiting trustees, 43 per cent said that they believe that it bad become more difficult to bring in new recruits.

Of the respondents, more than 43 per cent said that they spend one or two days on charity business each month. A further 27 per cent said that they spend between three to five days on charity business per month, and 14 per cent they spent more than five days on charity business each month.

However, on a lighter note, the survey revealed that 81 per cent of the respondents said that they felt valued by their charity’s board.

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