Teachers worry their pupils know more about computing than they do

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3rd February 2015 14:48 - Education

A recent poll, commissioned by Microsoft and subject association, Computing at School, has discovered that two in three teachers are Teachers worry their pupils know more about the computing than they doconcerned that their pupils are more knowledgeable about computing than they are.

The survey also uncovered that over 80 per cent of teachers desired further training, following the first term of teaching the brand new subject.

The findings have resulted in a call for education staff to undergo more training to develop their computing skills.

The findings support an alternative survey, also commissioned by Microsoft and Computing at School, which highlighted that over 50 per cent of students felt that they knew more about computing than their teachers.

Topics identified as areas they knew more about were programming and website development.

Of the nine to sixteen year olds surveyed, two in five claimed that their teachers were unconfident when delivering computing lessons.

In September 2014, computing was added to the curriculum as an alternative to ICT, which was abolished in 2012 by Michael Gove for being too “demotivating and dull”.

However, more than two in three teachers claimed to enjoy delivering computing lessons. Approximately the same figure of students, claimed that they found computing lessons both interesting and engaging.

The two surveys questioned a cumulative sample of just less than 280 teaching professionals and 1,700 students.

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