Majority cannot differentiate between fake and real news reports, survey finds

About The Authors

21st February 2017 10:40 - Media and PR

Majority cannot differentiate between fake and real news reports, survey finds: A recent media survey by Channel 4 has revealed that less than 5 per cent of people were able to correctly tell the difference between fake news articles and real articles when shown different examples.Majority cannot differentiate between fake and real news reports, survey finds

The survey was conducted by Channel 4 to launch its Fake News Week, which has been started to explore the increasing problem of fake news articles purporting to be factual news stories. Channel 4 aims to delve into the issue through a series of special reports and programmes.

Fake news is defined as fabricated stories which can take advantage of popular news topics. Websites which spread fake news are usually set up to make financial gain and/or to promote propaganda.

When the survey respondents were shown six news stories, half of which were true and half false, just 4 per cent of the 1,684 adults in the survey were able to correctly identify which three news stories were fake news stories.

When asked what platform the respondents consumed news through, more than 50 per cent said that they relied on broadcasters. Following broadcasters as the most popular way of digesting news was newspapers (17 per cent), other non-newspaper websites (17 per cent), Facebook (6 per cent) and Twitter (2 per cent).

In total, 50 per cent of the respondents thought at least one of the six stories was a fake news story. This percentage increase to 71 per cent amongst respondents whose primary source of news was Facebook. Amongst those who primarily consumed news through broadcasters, the percentage was 47 per cent.

Of the survey respondents, just less than 50 per cent said that they were concerned about the effects of fake news. This percentage increased to 57 per cent amongst those aged between 18 and 24.

Approximately two thirds of the respondents said that they believed that social media websites, such as Twitter and Facebook, are not making enough effort to combat the issue of fake news. A further 55 per cent said that they feel that the government is not doing enough to tackle fake news.

46 per cent of the participants said that they feel that more fact checking websites are needed. This figure rose to 69 per cent amongst those aged between 18 and 24.

Sign up for free insights from your sector…

Antispam code: 15212

Support Us..

We hope that you have found this article useful. This section is freely available for all to use. Please help support it by liking us or following us on our social media platforms:

Share this article..

For updated Media and PR insights please follow us on @DJS_Media_PR or use our RSS feed

Other Media and PR Research Findings

Other Latest Market Research Insights

© DJS Research 2017