Many Brits would not know how to help in an emergency, research shows

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21st January 2016 10:46 - Public Consultation

According to the findings of a recent survey, many British people do not know how to deal with an emergency situation, with some 70 per cent not Many Brits would not know how to help in an emergency, research showsknowing their own blood type, 50 per cent not knowing how to put someone in the recovery position and 10 per cent not knowing the way to the nearest hospital.

Perhaps most concerning, 30 per cent of people would not know which number to ring if they needed an ambulance, the fire brigade or the police.

The research comprised of a survey of 2,000 British adults and revealed a distinct lack of knowledge of how to do basic tasks such as checking if the smoke alarm is working, dealing with a power cut and what to do in the event of smelling gas.

Approximately 50 per cent said that they would panic and be nervous or stressed in the event of an emergency.

Gail Hunter, a spokeswoman leading fire and security firm, ADT, who commissioned the market research said of the findings:

"We are surprised by the findings of this research as householders should be prepared for emergencies that can take place at any time.

"Unfortunately, people don't often think it could happen to them but ensuring that you and your family have safety precautions in place and basic knowledge of what to do if there is an emergency by visiting the NHS website, could help to save lives."

The survey also revealed that 1 in 3 British adults are not sure how to test if the smoke alarm work. Further to this, 41 per cent said that they would not know which number to dial in the event of a fire.

More than half of the survey respondents said that the do not routinely test their fire alarms and 10 per cent believe that testing their alarms twice a year is enough.

Cars were found to be a source of confusion for many British people, with 68 per cent of the respondents not knowing how to change a car tyre and 58 per cent not knowing what to do if they broke down. A further 52 per cent do not know how to check a car’s oil levels.

Which safety measures British people struggle with:

Helping someone having an asthma attack - 79 per cent

Dealing with an allergic reaction - 77 per cent

Know your own blood type - 69 per cent

Changing a tyre - 68 per cent

Performing CPR - 66 per cent

Dealing with a burst pipe/leak - 64 per cent

Helping someone who is choking - 59 per cent

Dealing with a broken down car - 58 per cent

Finding the stop cock to turn off the water in the house - 53 per cent

How to check the oil in a car - 52 per cent

How to change a lightbulb without electrocuting yourself - 52 per cent

How to change the fuse in a plug - 51 per cent

What to do if you smell gas - 51 per cent

What to do if the electricity cuts out - 51 per cent

How to put someone in the recovery position - 50 per cent

Dealing with a chip pan fire - 47 per cent

Where the fuse box is in a house - 45 per cent

Checking for a pulse - 45 per cent

Finding the nearest hospital - 42 per cent

Know your own National Insurance number - 41 per cent

Who to call in the event of a fire - 39 per cent

What number to dial to call for fire assistance - 33 per cent

What number to dial to call an ambulance - 30 per cent

What number to dial to call the police - 29 per cent

How to check if the smoke alarm is working - 27 per cent

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