Majority of private sector members of ITS UK say initial impact of COVID-19 'has not been too severe', according to survey

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10th April 2020 02:04 - Transport and Distribution

Majority of private sector members of ITS UK say initial impact of COVID-19 'has not been too severe': A survey on behalf of the Department for Transport by ITS (UK) has found that most organisations are reporting that the initial impact of COVID-19 has not been too severe, with more than half the businesses polled feeling confident that their operations will return to normal when the crisis ends. 

However, around a quarter of the private company members polled said the outbreak has already had a significant impact on their company. Just one in 10 said the COVID-19 crisis is yet to have an impact on business.

Carried out after lockdown measures were announced, 70 ITS UK members (out of a possible 140) gave responses to the survey. The research found that three-quarters have experienced a loss in business since the outbreak began, seeing scheduled work put on hold or deferred. However, just one in 10 said that when thinking about the future they feel 'very worried'. 

So far, a third of the members polled have taken the move to furlough employees or cut salaries. 

The research also revealed that there is support within the ITS industry to seek ways to maintain the fall in transport use and traffic levels when the pandemic is over.

 ITS UK said in a statement: "The ITS industry should, they believe, work to promote solutions to retain some of the reduction."



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