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			<title>Market Research RSS Feeds</title>
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			<description>Market Research RSS Feeds</description>
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			<item>
				<title>
					2021 off to a great start as we welcome eight new staff!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/2021-off-to-a-great-start-as-we-welcome-eight-new-staff
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/2021-off-to-a-great-start-as-we-welcome-eight-new-staff
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				<title>
					Reframing project management – a person centred approach.
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
	
		But what do you actually do?
	
		At this point in a normal year, you'd find me steeling myself for a season of awkward gatherings. Smiling patiently while distant and aged relatives perform their annual interrogation:
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Reframing-project-management-a-person-centred-approach
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Reframing-project-management-a-person-centred-approach
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			<item>
				<title>
					40 more decades of loyalty from DJS staff!
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				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/40-more-decades-of-loyalty-from-DJS-staff
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/40-more-decades-of-loyalty-from-DJS-staff
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				<title>
					Jack went to Poland: What I did with my DJS volunteering day...
				</title>
				<description>
					
	

	 

	 

	 

	 

	 

	 

	 

	 

	Written by Jack Watson, Research Manager

	 

	For nine months in 2016, I lived and worked in Poland completing something known then as European Voluntary Service (EVS). The programme is little-known in the UK, but enables all young people legally resident in Europe, aged between 18 and 30, to carry out an international volunteer service for NGOs, charities, or public bodies for a period ranging from two to 12 months. The only other prerequisite is that the volunteering must be done outside of your home nation. 

	 

	Before starting my research career, I wanted to live somewhere outside of the UK and this provided a unique opportunity to come into contact with a different culture and acquire new skills and abilities that would be useful for my personal and professional growth upon my return. I jumped at the chance then to go and live with four other volunteers from France, Portugal and Macedonia, where we worked in a local volunteer centre in the city of Kielce.  

	

	 

	As well as being involved in the organisation of 'International Evenings' that brought together volunteers, local students and Erasmus students, I ran weekly workshops in Communicative English and a Current Affairs discussion through a programme called Przystanek M?odych, or 'Bus Stop for Youth', which provided a free learning platform for local residents in our city, and visited local schools and universities for cultural exchange sessions and discussions on the value of volunteer work. A proudest achievement was organising a 'Human Library', where people were 'books' that you could rent out for 15-minute discussions about anything and everything to do with that person, hopefully broadening the minds of those who came along to talk and learn.

	 

	Earlier this year, before the nationwide lockdown, I was invited to return to Poland to attend a week-long conference and evaluation meeting alongside other former-volunteers because in 2018, the EVS programme was replaced by something new, called European Solidarity Corps (ESC). The overall aims of the week were to think about how better to promote ESC projects amongst young people and how to encourage and prepare volunteers to participate in them. Once a volunteer arrives, it can sometimes feel like quite a daunting experience to be dropped in an entirely different country, so we also discussed how to manage a group of international volunteers well and how to maintain motivation and commitment to these longer-term projects. 

	 

	An amazing thing about working at DJS Research is that they provide you with one day a year to volunteer for something close to your heart. My nine months in Poland were a very formative experience for me and helped shape my openness and tolerance to anyone and everyone, so I was delighted to be able to use this volunteer day (alongside some annual leave!) to head back to Kielce and discuss the merits of the programme amongst like-minded people. I'm sure everyone at DJS Research is excited to be able to use their volunteer day in the coming months as the world starts to open up a bit more; I was just lucky enough to be able to use mine right before lockdown began!

	 

	It also felt important for me to attend the conference because the UK's participation in these multinational projects is under threat as they are partly funded by Erasmus, a scheme which might end in the UK when the transition period of leaving the EU is over. COVID-19 has obviously thrown another small spanner in the works with regards to international travel but I wanted to write this blog post to highlight the fact that free travel and work opportunities are still available.  

	

	 

	If you have siblings, nieces, nephews, children who are unsure of their next steps... If you personally feel like a completely new and different challenge, then take a look at what alternative options are available to you. Living in Poland changed my outlook on life. Although I had free accommodation and local travel, I survived (and thrived) on euro;180 each month and met some lifelong friends who still today remain important people in my life. Every volunteer project is different, read up about them, find something you love the sound of and apply! There are short-term projects available through the ESC programme too for those who feel more constrained by time. It's a big world out there; we should definitely take the opportunity to explore it!

	Get more DJS News: 

	Our contribution during the Covid-19 crisis

	 

	Confirmation Bias, Market Research and Dominic Cummings

	 

	Searching for meaning: a tongue in cheek look at trends on Trends

				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Jack-went-to-Poland-What-I-did-with-my-DJS-volunteering-day
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Jack-went-to-Poland-What-I-did-with-my-DJS-volunteering-day
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			<item>
				<title>
					Review of the year 2020: it's been a very different year!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Review-of-the-year-2020-its-been-a-very-different-year
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Review-of-the-year-2020-its-been-a-very-different-year
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			<item>
				<title>
					DJS Research - Review of the Year 2019
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Review-of-the-Year-2019
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Review-of-the-Year-2019
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				<title>
					Fundraising in the age of Covid-19: Our 25 on the 25th Challenge for the Thomas Theyer Foundation
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Fundraising-in-the-age-of-Covid-19-Our-25-on-the-25th-Challenge-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Fundraising-in-the-age-of-Covid-19-Our-25-on-the-25th-Challenge-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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			<item>
				<title>
					Unwrapping Christmas retail for the fashion sector
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				<description>
					
	  
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Unwrapping-Christmas-retail-for-the-fashion-sector
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				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Unwrapping-Christmas-retail-for-the-fashion-sector
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			<item>
				<title>
					We've been awarded the WRAP qualitative services contract!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	

	 

	
		We are delighted to announce, that following a two-stage tendering process, DJS Research has been awarded a sole supplier contract to provide WRAP (Waste  Resources Action Programme) with qualitative research services. Over the next three years we will be collaborating with WRAP, and their partners, across all WRAP's priority areas, specifically:
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Weve-been-awarded-the-WRAP-qualitative-services-contract
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Weve-been-awarded-the-WRAP-qualitative-services-contract
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				<title>
					Well done Alex for completing the 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		It's been a year like no other - with restrictions and closures and life as we knew it being turned on its head due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Many events have been postponed and live sport has been hugely affected - but earlier this month, the most famous marathon in the world finally got underway...
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Well-done-Alex-for-completing-the-2020-Virgin-Money-London-Marathon
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Well-done-Alex-for-completing-the-2020-Virgin-Money-London-Marathon
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				<title>
					We're Hiring! We have two new positions at our growing agency
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Were-Hiring-We-have-two-new-positions-at-our-growing-agency
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Were-Hiring-We-have-two-new-positions-at-our-growing-agency
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				<title>
					We are pleased to announce the promotion of Elliot Simmonds to Research Director
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-pleased-to-announce-promotion-of-Elliot-Simmonds-to-Research-Director
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-pleased-to-announce-promotion-of-Elliot-Simmonds-to-Research-Director
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			<item>
				<title>
					Words to live by? How the language we speak influences our behaviour
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		Written by Elliot Simmonds, Research Director. Email Elliot or comment on LinkedIn.
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
			It's an oft-repeated notion that Eskimos have 50 words for snow. The truth of this is debatable and I'm no linguist. Still, the idea, right or wrong, raises some questions. Does the place we live influence the language we speak? Beyond that, does the language we speak influence the way we think, and does the way we speak impact how we act?
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Words-to-live-by-How-the-language-we-speak-influences-our-behaviour
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Words-to-live-by-How-the-language-we-speak-influences-our-behaviour
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					We are recruiting again!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-recruiting-again
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-recruiting-again
				</guid>
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			<item>
				<title>
					Our contribution during the Covid-19 crisis
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-contribution-during-the-Covid-19-crisis
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-contribution-during-the-Covid-19-crisis
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			<item>
				<title>
					Confirmation Bias, Market Research and Dominic Cummings
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		Written by Alasdair Gleed, Research Director. Email Alasdair
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Confirmation-Bias-Market-Research-and-Dominic-Cummings
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Confirmation-Bias-Market-Research-and-Dominic-Cummings
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				<title>
					Healthwatch publishes our research looking at young people's experiences of mental healthcare
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
	
		 
	
		Healthwatch has published the research we undertook for the organisation last year, looking at young people's experiences of mental healthcare and what can be done to improve it. 
	
		 
	
		The statutory body, which exists to understand the needs, experiences and concerns of people who use health and social care services, has heard from more than 20,000 young people over the last three years. Our research sought to gain a deeper understanding of the issues facing young people, and their experiences accessing and using mental healthcare services, which are outlined in our video published on the Healthwatch website.
	
		 
	
		The Research
	
		 
	
		The research saw us speak to 47 young people aged 16-25 about what affects their mental health, their experiences of mental healthcare, as well as asking them how they would like to see extra funding used to support them.
	
		 
	
		The findings helped shape Healthwatch's 'Three Steps to improve mental health support for young people'.
	
		 
	
		From the research, it was concluded that better education and communication, more options and personalised care, as well as peer support are needed in order to better support young people across local communities, and improve their experiences of mental healthcare. 
	
		 
	
		What young people want:
	
		 
	
		The young people we spoke to for Healthwatch said they'd like to see ongoing support for their emotional wellbeing and longer follow-up treatments, as well as realistic portrayals of mental health in the media, which they hoped would in turn reduce stigma. They also told us they would like mental health to form part of the formal school curriculum, and have access to free mental health check ups for young people every six months.  
	
		
	
		 
	
		Take a look at the video and read the report here


	Get more DJS News: 

	Our research helps Healthwatch define its 'Three steps to improve mental health support for young people'

	 

	For the Love of Scrubs: What I did with my DJS Volunteering Day...

	 

	When everyone is busy being objectively similar, try cultivating your subjective difference...

				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Healthwatch-publishes-our-research-looking-at-young-peoples-experiences-of-mental-healthcare
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Healthwatch-publishes-our-research-looking-at-young-peoples-experiences-of-mental-healthcare
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				<title>
					Searching for meaning: a tongue in cheek look at trends on Trends
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
	
		Written by Elliot Simmonds, Associate Director. Email Elliot
	
		 
	
		One of the great things about the modern era is the availability of information – both to us as individual consumers, but also to those of us whose job it is to distil information down in to meaning. And by 'meaning', I mean a collection of charts which illustrate some things I find interesting or amusing. If you've come for hard-hitting analysis and insight, you're probably best reading something from Alex McCluckie.
	
		 
	
		Despite its many ills, one perceived 'positive' aspect of COVID-19, at least originally, was the opportunity to slow-down, spend some time doing those things we had always meant to do, and maybe improve ourselves as human beings a little bit. Blog posts abound on the topic. Course delivery and educational sites downed their paywalls, Audible by Amazon is giving away free digital versions of audio book classics you've always wanted to read, but never have (Paradise Lost, anyone?) and Joe Wicks is going to turn you in to an Adonis, you Adonis.[1]
	
		 
	
		At least that was the plan. But our habits are, for the most part, difficult to break - and I wanted to explore a little bit of what we'd really been getting up to. There's a lot of survey data knocking about on the topic already, and so another COVID-19 Tracker felt like one too many - although, if you are specifically interested in a culture audience, please drop me an email. 
	
		 
	
		As a free data source, with a fairly large sample size, Google Trends isn't a bad place to start. Whilst my initial focus was on habits, this quickly descended in to 'interesting stuff' and what follows is a fairly loosely connected examination of some of the things we in the UK have been searching for on Google - I hope you find it interesting, enlightening and, in some cases, amusing, in equal measure.[2]
	
		 
	
		Health and leisure
	
		Starting with that quest for fitness, we saw an initial clamour for multi-gyms which was at a five-year high.
	
		 
	
		


	 

	However, the fitness craze quickly began to drop off:

	 

	

	 

	
		And we turned to other priorities:
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		The laying of patio actually comes from personal experience - at least three members of my close friendship group (yep, 60%) have undertaken some sort of landscaping project and, generally, with a great deal of success. Given one of them is a Chartered Surveyor, this feels like the minimum expectation. 
	
		 
	
		Nevertheless, despite the rise in physical activity (it's laying a patio specifically, not searching for someone to lay a patio for you), on Saturdays, some things stayed broadly the same...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...but we also also added a more social element, in lieu of being able to go out...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...though unfortunately, in film and in hygiene, American cultural hegemony remains: [3]
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Education
	
		Thankfully (especially given the above), education remained a serious consideration, particularly early on:
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		 
	
		However, both those with primary and secondary age children alike struggled with certain aspects...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...with inevitable results...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Opportunities lost, opportunities gained...
	
		 
	
		Importantly, we quickly understood that the situation wasn't one we could get away from...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...and whilst some of us put off big decisions as a result...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...some of us saw an opportunity to improve our future.
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Others, saw an opportunity to experience something...new. That said, it's heart-warming to see a handful (excuse the pun) of early adopters in January. 
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Closing thoughts
	
		Encouragingly, some of us started to realise what was important...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...and what, perhaps, wasn't.
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		But more people than ever, were asking the most important question of all:
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
	
		 
	
		Notes:
	
		[1] I have absolutely no connection with Amazon aside from being a customer, but I think this is such a superb offer I've linked to it here: https://stories.audible.com/discovery/enterprise-discovery-21122353011?ref=adbl_ent_anon_ds_ds_dccs_sbtp-0-5
	
		 
	
		[2] It's important to note a couple of caveats here - the first being that this is purely data from Google, and whilst Google has a huge share of the search market, it isn't 100%. The other, is the charts above show relative figures on an index across a set time period (see X-axis for all charts) - they do not show volume per se and one chart is not comparable with another. Whilst Google says...
	
		 
	
		Google Trends does filter out some types of searches, such as:
	
		 
	
		bull; Searches made by very few people: Trends only shows data for popular terms, so search terms with low volume appear as "0"
	
		 
	
		...it does not provide figures around search volume - so we don't know whether the difference between a score of 100 vs. 25 is 100,000,000 vs. 25,000,000 or whether it is 100,000 vs. 25,000. That said, I'd argue the relative change is more interesting than the absolute change anyway.
	
		 
	
		If you want to understand a little more about Google Trends and the data it includes, there's a link here:
	
		 
	
		https://support.google.com/trends/answer/4365533?hl=en
	
		 
	
		[3] Very interested to know the cause of the August 2019 spike here...any thoughts?
	
		 


	


	 

	Get more DJS News: 

	Healthwatch publishes our research looking at young people's experiences of mental healthcare

	 

	For the Love of Scrubs: What I did with my DJS Volunteering Day...

	 

	When everyone is busy being objectively similar, try cultivating your subjective difference...

				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Searching-for-meaning-a-tongue-in-cheek-look-at-trends-on-Trends
				</link>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Searching-for-meaning-a-tongue-in-cheek-look-at-trends-on-Trends
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				<title>
					For the Love of Scrubs: What I did with my DJS Volunteering Day...
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
	
		 
	
		Written by Helen Menzies, Associate Director
	
		 
	
		When I joined DJS Research at the end of last year, as part of my induction I was informed about annual volunteer days. Every employee can take one paid day off work to help out a cause of their choice.  DJS has always supported local charities and our current 'charity of the year' is the Thomas Theyer Foundation – although colleagues can support any cause they choose.
	
		 
	
		Before joining the company, I had seen photographs of charity walks, runs, climbs and sports matches on the website and social media pages.  I was certainly drawn to these charitable values and keen to work somewhere that is genuinely dedicated to giving back. Although, if I'm honest, I was a bit worried I'd have to sign up for a marathon!  
	
		 
	
		As it turned out, my new colleagues were doing all sorts of things for causes close to their hearts.  Some apply the skills they use at work, for example helping budding young entrepreneurs to learn about research and marketing, and others help out in the local community or charity shops. 
	
		 
	
		Naturally, in my first few months I had a lot to learn and new projects to get up to speed with. The volunteer day went to the back of my mind - something for the summer perhaps.  Then, in March, the world turned upside down. 
	
		 
	
		Suddenly, we were all working from home. Then into lockdown.  After a period of re-adjustment, I, like many of my colleagues and friends, started to think about what I could do to help.  Evidence of random acts of kindness, generosity and compassion was sweeping the nation amid tragic daily death totals on the news.  Rainbows started appearing in windows. We began clapping for carers every Thursday night. Thousands of people signed up to become NHS volunteers.  
	
		 
	
		I noticed on social media that some clothing companies, costume designers and home sewers (like me) had started to sew scrubs for the NHS.  With so many medical staff called upon to fight coronavirus on the front line, there was suddenly a need for thousands of pairs of scrubs. And quickly.  I looked into this further and found the Facebook campaign 'For the Love of Scrubs' had been set up to co-ordinate home sewers in producing scrubs for hospitals and GP surgeries all over the country.
	
		 
	
		As much as I love sewing (and I really do – I have taken over an entire room in our house with boxes of fabric), working in a busy research agency and racing around after a boisterous toddler doesn't leave me with much time for my favourite hobby these days.  But then I remembered – the volunteer day! Knowing that I could take a day out of work specifically dedicated to this lifted the time barrier and gave me the push I needed to get involved.  
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		I contacted the co-ordinator in my area to check what supplies I needed and ordered the correct fabric.  Pattern designer Sew Different made a scrubs pattern available for free download and many online fabric shops are prioritising orders for scrubs fabric.  Fundraising campaigns were started to help those who wanted to help but couldn't afford the fabric. Yet another example of people coming together in a time of crisis with their time, money and support. 
	
		 
	
		Can you make a difference in a day?  Well, I like to think so. I'm certainly not expecting a round of applause on Thursday night because I did some sewing, but the GP who received the scrubs I made knows they were made with love and when she puts them on I hope she is reminded that we are all so grateful for the fact she, like so many other front line staff, is going to work today.  
	
		 
	
		Ultimately, thinking beyond the specific task we complete on our volunteer day, it is about what we stand for as a company and the values we promote. Enabling us to take one day out of our working life can lead to something much bigger.  People make connections with their community and start to volunteer on a longer-term basis, outside of work. We can also learn new skills, meet new people and build self-confidence – all things that can benefit us personally both in and outside the workplace.  You could say that the volunteer days are just the start – they are there to nudge us in the right direction, a bit like the free fruit in the office. 
	
		 
	
		I hope the humanitarian spirit I have witnessed in my local area and all over the country will continue when life gets back to 'normal', but I know it will at DJS. 
	
		 
	
		Watch the clip:
	
		 
	
		  
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/For-the-Love-of-Scrubs-What-I-did-with-my-DJS-Volunteering-Day
				</link>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/For-the-Love-of-Scrubs-What-I-did-with-my-DJS-Volunteering-Day
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				<title>
					Why are we so bad at social distancing?
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Why-are-we-so-bad-at-social-distancing
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Why-are-we-so-bad-at-social-distancing
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				<title>
					Exit Interview Market Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 An exit interview is a face-to-face research method performed when a customer is departing. Usually undertaken at shops, exit interviews are designed to assess the consumer's thoughts about their visit; what they liked and what they think the company could improve on. Companies will also seek out participants who no longer want to work with that company, so they can understand the reason for wanting to switch to a competitor or change occupation. This can often be with competitors because of the specific skill set the employee has gained while working there.

  

 A further use for exit interviews is that they can somewhat make amends for the wrongdoings in the eyes of the leaving customer. An exit interview shows that the company cares about their customers, especially if they act quickly on the feedback. This may encourage the customer to return if the company can show their improvements or, at a minimum, express a positive opinion on the company to someone else.

  

 Exit interviews require a questionnaire with a variety of closed and open questions. Closed questions are used to gain a bit of specific information about the respondent but also to keep the interview shorter to give them the best chance at completion. Open questions, however, are used to gain a bigger insight into the exact reason they decided to leave or about a fault in the company.
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					Research Design
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				<description>
					
 Research design is a general plan or 'blueprint' that will dictate how the research study is to be performed. The researcher will use essential components such as: type of data needed, cost, time, research objectives and target population to decide upon guidelines to be followed during the research study. A good research design should be simple to ensure it is easy to follow and should be written down on paper. 

  

 There are three main types of research design: exploratory, descriptive and experimental (causal). Each research design method has different qualities and can be used in different scenarios. Exploratory design is adopted when attempting to discover information and does not pursue a definitive answer. Instead, it covers the research topic in all levels of depth to greater the researcher's understanding. Exploratory research design can provide the first step in fully understanding a problem or question but is limited in giving a definitive answer.

  

 Descriptive design is performed when answering a specific question, often involving a hypothesis. However, it cannot be used to explain the results or to allow the researcher to understand why the research study gave the answers it did. Descriptive research design, however, is also effective at allowing the researcher to analyse the data to gain a greater understanding of the problem.

  

 Experimental design attempts to measure the effect of manipulating the independent variable on the dependent variable. It is better than descriptive and exploratory design in finding solutions for marketing problems. Experimental research design can limit bias as the study allows the researcher to have better control over the independent, dependent and extraneous variables.
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					Behavioural Economics Research
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				<description>
					
 Behavioural economics is a research method often used by psychologists to study people's decision making. It is performed in research studies to better understand a customer's reasoning behind their responses by making sense of their subconscious decisions. Market researchers are using behavioural economics more and more because of its effectiveness at limiting bias and its ability to allow the researchers to greater understand the reasons behind the consumer's decisions.

  

 The psychologist Daniel Kahneman explains two modes describing the way humans think: system 1 (fast mode) and system 2 (slow mode). 'Fast mode' is used in situations such as simple Maths and is how researchers want participants to make decisions. Researchers keep participants in system 1 by applying time pressure as to ensure they do not become too logical in their thinking. System 2, however, is the more rational way of thinking and allows for the consumer to deliberate all the details to make a more informative decision. 

  

 It is thought that over 80% of decisions are made in 'fast mode' as it's an unconscious, initial response to a situation – it is how a consumer first decides if they like a product or not and is the mode that branding and marketing primarily appeals to. Fast mode also explains how people are able to complete their shopping in a few minutes or hours, while being faced with thousands of different options.
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					Market Research Brief
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 A market research brief is a document written by the client, that should outline what they wish to find out during the research study. The aim of the brief is to allow the researcher to confidently plan and conduct a study. It is expected that the client has thought about the problems thoroughly and has set objectives, although these may be changed as discussions about the brief take place.

  

 Often the reason that a research study needs to be completed is because of a problem that a company wants to uncover and resolve. In the brief, the client should outline this problem and ensure the researcher understands the stages leading up to the issue. Next in the brief should be a description of the product and market so the researcher knows as much information as possible. The more the researcher understands, the better they can tailor the study for the product. Furthermore, a clear statement of the objectives should be included, however this can be thought out with the researcher if the client has limited knowledge. Before the research study begins, the researcher should be made aware of any financial or time limits the client has.

  

 A good research brief should mean the researcher can feel assured that when they start the research study, they are aiming to find the correct information. It should allow the researcher to find the best methodology for the particular study, making it easier, quicker and more cost-efficient for the client.
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					Staff Market Research
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 Staff research is performed amongst employees to uncover their true opinions and experiences. It is of increasing importance, because the research helps improve customer and employee satisfaction. High employee satisfaction increases the likelihood of people applying for future vacancies as it will be perceived as a nice environment to work in. 

  

 The main reason for the use of staff research is to keep the employees happy in the workplace. Understanding what motivates them will allow for any company to keep its workforce focussed and happy. Staff research can also uncover what the employees dislike about their work, allowing for the company to change and improve. Research studies have shown a direct link between employee engagement and customer satisfaction – further highlighting the necessity for motivated and satisfied employees.

  

 Like most methodologies within market research, staff research can be performed in a variety of different ways. One of the main decisions, however, is which type of data will be used – primary or secondary. Primary data will predominantly be performed via questionnaires and can easily be sent to staff members through their email. Providing closed questions can ensure the survey produces quantitative data and makes sure that the respondent has adequate time to complete it. On the other hand, secondary data is considerably cheaper to perform and is predominately performed with the use of sales data gathered over a longer period of time. Sales data can show consumer purchase differentiations and general customer trends. Using the specific information from the company and public data about employee satisfaction, a detailed study and analysis can be performed to provide a less-detailed yet more cost-effective strategy to uncover employee engagement.
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					Agile Market Research
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				<description>
					
 The idea of 'agile' was first used by companies that made and developed products. It was used to connect all the parts of the project, from the planning team to the testing team, to gain a faster customer insight. The separate teams involved in creating a product work together to create a more basic version, which is then released to the public. Research is then conducted into the consumer's thoughts on the product and then relayed back to the manufacturing company. The process then begins again, but the product released this time will have some additional features added based on the customer feedback. This process is repeated until the final product is launched.

  

 The contrasting methodology to agile is waterfall, which is a more linear strategy. When the waterfall strategy is used, the various teams work separately and the project is passed down an established line until launch. During the project, there will be limited customer feedback about the product, which could cause an issue if there are unforeseen features that have not been added.

  

 A research team will need to fit into these strategies as to work alongside the manufacturing company. Most products, nowadays, are made using the agile approach, meaning any market research performed will need to follow alongside the product. During agile market research, there will be an increased number of smaller studies performed, as opposed to a bigger study at the full launch of a waterfall project.
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					Respondent Fatigue
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 Respondent fatigue commonly occurs when the participant becomes tired of the survey they are being asked to complete. The participant's attention and motivation will drop during the latter stages, leading to a deterioration in the quality of their answers. Signs of respondent fatigue can be easily noticed when analysing the data - participants will often answer "don't know" or phrases similar. When the participants are asked to circle answers, they could show 'straight line' responding (picking all the answers in the same row or column).

  

 Eliminating or decreasing the chance of respondent fatigue is a primary focus when planning a research study because guaranteeing the data is kept as valid as possible will allow for easier analysis at the end of the study. Researchers can do this by ensuring the survey is short and the participant is not given too many surveys at the same time. Furthermore, selecting the right participants is important as to make sure they are answering questions about a topic they are interested in.

  

 For example, a researcher is conducting an exit interview for a supermarket chain, into the decreasing number of customers at a particular shop. Surveying participants as they are doing something else will increase the likelihood of respondent fatigue because they could become more agitated about not being able to do what they were doing. The researcher, therefore, must make the survey short and simple to gain the most valid data.
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					Multi-Client Market Research
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 Multi-client market research is the phrase used to describe a project when the cost and findings from the study are shared among at least two different clients. The clients decide how they split the cost and decide upon how the data will be shared. They are often used when a client doesn't have the funds to afford the study, or when two people want to know the same information. All the clients will be able to have their say at each point of the research study to ensure everyone is getting what they view as value for money.

  

 Multi-client market research projects are also commonly used as a way to perform a research study on behalf of a whole industry. These are often performed for clients or in an attempt to boost the industry as a whole after a fall-off in sales. 

  

 A multi-client research study will follow the same guidelines as any other study; however, the data collection must suit everyone involved, which could make the study harder for the researcher. Some of the clients might have strong ethical views that could affect the way in which the study is carried out. All clients must also be satisfied with the analysis and the amount of information they gain out of the research study; meaning more data would need to be collected or shared.
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					Full-Service Market Research Agency
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				<description>
					
 A full-service agency offers a full end-to-end market research study; from first deciding upon a plan, to analysing and interpreting the data. Often the research company will collect the data themselves, however, they could select to use a separate company that specialises in fieldwork. A research project performed by a full-service agency is long but can be divided into three simple stages...

  

 The first stage is planning and proposal – this will outline the purpose of the study, as well as what is to be achieved. The research company will discuss this with the client and together will decide upon an appropriate plan that covers all aspects of the brief in the most suitable way. This is arguably the most important stage of the study because it lays the foundations for the rest of the project.

  

 The next stage is the collection of data. The research company will decide on whether to gather the information themselves or if they are going to use an independent fieldwork company to do it. This can be done in multiple different ways depending on the brief and the plan.

  

 The final part of the study is the analysis of data. The full-service agency will verify its validity and create an analysis plan. Once the plan has been carried out and all the data has been checked, they will create and present a report about the whole project from start to finish.
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					Street Research Survey
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				<description>
					
 A street survey is often performed as an interview and is a form of face-to-face market research. The use of a street survey is most effective when a large demographic need to be interviewed, as it is often the fastest method of fieldwork. They can be undertaken at most public events, outside shops or anywhere public, as long as the target population can be easily identified by the researcher. For example, if the researcher wanted to survey University students, they could wait outside a University, and perform the research study there.

  

 Due to the fact that the respondents being interviewed are often busy doing something else, street surveys are kept short and concise; usually no longer than 5 minutes. Most of the questions are closed as to gather as much information as possible in a short amount of time. However, some may be left open for the participant to elaborate on.

  

 One of the most advantageous uses of a street interview is to collect a wide range of public opinion. They also allow for the researcher to read facial expressions in an attempt to ascertain if the respondent is bias, or to ask them to elaborate. Furthermore, street surveys allow for the researcher to engage with the respondent and to be in complete control of extraneous variables.
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					Online Market Research Panel
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 An online market research panel is a group of online individuals who respond to various research studies presented to them. For the researcher to get to the correct target population, the online research panel must first share an extensive amount of information about themselves; which is then used to aid selection of participants for certain research studies. They are effective at gaining an insight into what customer's and employee's views are about the company or a product.

  

 There are two types of online market research panels: business-to-business (B2B) and business-to-customer (B2C). An online business-to-business panel is formed when business owners, professionals and decision-makers respond to business-related surveys about the market. This will help a company ascertain if there is a viable gap in the market for their product or service, as well as opening up new opportunities for future business ventures.

  

 An online business-to-customer panel is established when a customer or end-user of their product is sought out by the company to respond to the surveys. The range of the participants can be broad or precise depending on the research study and the researcher. Using an online business-to-customer panel is an effective way of understanding what the consumer wants compared with what the company is offering.

  

 The response rates of an online market research panel tend to be high because the participants have all volunteered to be part of the research. The response rate is also affected by who is chosen, which makes it more crucial that the right participants are selected at the start.
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					Market Research Online Community (MROC)
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 The concept of a market research online community is loosely based around social media platforms. The community consists of a closed group of members that converse about a specific topic related to market research. The best communities will have between 25 and 75 highly engaged members at any point; any more than this and the discussion may become diluted.

  

 A market research online community can provide researchers with quick data at short notice meaning they are effective when immediate feedback is needed. On the other hand, the discussions can last for months, or even years, if the study requires it. This allows for the respondents to be guided through complex topics over an extended period of time. Especially when the discussion is over a longer duration, the participants should be rewarded for their time and knowledge. Gift cards, coupons and vouchers are popular in the community because monetary rewards can't guarantee the preferred results.

  

 The understanding and knowledge individuals have on given topics can be shown in a variety of different ways. Market research online community members contribute primarily through the use of video recordings and blog entries and are actively encouraged to do so.

  

 The nature of a market research online community means the participants have to have signed up themselves, which shows they have an interest in the topic. An MROC also allows for the researcher to have a group of respondents ready to answer any survey or questionnaire quickly.
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					Hospitality Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Market research is pivotal in the hospitality industry in many different scenarios, and the collection of customer feedback is one of the important ways that a research study can be used to good effect. Hospitality is all about the customer's experience, and the easiest way to improve this, is to find out what they liked most, as well as what they did not like as much, often with the aid of an intercept interview. A concise intercept interview is best at eliciting the most concise and useful information from leaving guests due to its simplicity and the vast array of data that can be collected.

  

 The hospitality industry also uses market research to identify a change in trends and market, allowing them to evolve yet stay ahead of their competitors. Gathering data from several years ago can help a new company understand change in the market and anticipate future trends.

  

 Performing market research about what type of guests will be accommodated is also important. Setting up a hotel, for example, in a location that students predominantly visit, often requires relatively cheap accommodation. However, a hotel in a place such as Dubai would probably call for more expensive luxuries. 

  

 Prospective customers decide on what hospitality services to use depending on a variety of different factors. Performing research studies can provide the data that shows which specific hospitality services to target, and which have less of an impact on the customer's decision. For example, implementing new technology into a hotel may encourage more guests to stay than to increase facilities such as swimming pools.

  

 To learn more about our services and experience in this area, click here: Hospitality Market Research.
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					Restaurant Market Research
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 Before restaurants are open, there will be an increased amount of market research performed to uncover a gap in the local market or to illicit what the consumers are really looking for. A common type of market research done for restaurants, prior to opening, is competitor analysis. Understanding the brand equity of a competitor can reveal what the prospective customers are looking for. Furthermore, finding out what consumers like and dislike about the competition allows a restaurant to either sway away or to imitate them to an extent.
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					Hotel Market Research
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 For a hotel to be competitive, the necessary research needs to be undertaken before opening, regarding its competitors. Uncovering the rates that competitors are working at and what is included in the price, allows for a new hotel to better either the price, or the accommodation. Furthermore, understanding where there is a gap in the market can encourage a new company to move more towards filling it.

  

 The hotel industry requires a lot of consumer interactions which, in turn, makes customer services more important. Performing market research into the customer's views is not only made more important when guests are staying in the rooms, but is also made easier. Hotels have a specific target market, and finding that target market can prove challenging. However, once a hotel is open, this target market will be staying there, allowing the researchers to be confident they're researching the correct participants. A common way this research is performed is by intercept interviews, either on the way out of the hotel or as guests enter. A short and concise questionnaire with closed questions will ensure that the participant has time to finish it while also gaining an expansive amount of information.

  

 Conducting market research into the location of the hotel alongside what the company is offering is also vital. For example, setting up a company offering the best in accommodation and facilities would be best in an area where there is increased demand, but not as many high-end hotels. Understanding consumer demand will allow the company to better plan what they need to include, and what would be more cost effective to leave out.

  

 To learn more about our services and experience in this area, click here: Hotel Market Research.
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					Confirmation Bias
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				<description>
					
 Confirmation bias is when a participant unconsciously recalls or selects information that supports their beliefs and values. It is also known that people will use ambiguous evidence to support their views, when it could in fact contradict their point. An easy way to help eliminate confirmation bias is to ask the participant to disprove it. This is shown to make it easier to pick holes in what their saying and make a better judgement.

  

 In today's society, there are more things than ever that impact confirmation bias, including social media. Many posts that appear online have been created using a filter. The influence of social media on confirmation bias is significant because the many edited pictures may cause the viewer to believe something which is not reality, and could even shape their unconscious beliefs. 

  

 Confirmation bias happens every day, from choosing what to eat to a favourite character in a TV series; however, a more common instance is what we search for online. For example, if you were to search for 'Is football better than cricket?' the results would lead you to believe football is superior. On the other hand, searching for 'Is cricket better than football?' will give you the impression cricket is more popular. This shows how wording questions slightly differently depending on what beliefs someone has prior, can greatly affect the results given. 
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					Competitor Market Research Analysis
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 Competitor analysis is a research study designed to find the strengths and weaknesses of a rival brand, and to ascertain which scenarios provide the best opportunities for your business. Ultimately the aim of competitor analysis is to find out what your competitors are doing in order to stay one step ahead.

  

 Competitor analysis is a process that starts by selecting a predetermined goal. The goal can be chosen based off current market trends, current market players or identifying strengths and weaknesses of existing marketing strategies used in the specific field.

  

 The next stage is to identify the direct, secondary and indirect competitors correctly; often using a customer journey map or online research. For competitor analysis to be most effective, the companies that provide the biggest threat must be identified and focused on.

  

 Once the competitors have been selected, the framework and planning of the market research must be deduced. This can be a framework that is created, or one that is already existing and then modified to fit the purpose of the research study. When this is complete, all that is left to do is collect and analyse the data.

  

 Competitive analysis is effective at allowing a company to build a greater understanding of the current market and how their customers view the competition. It is also good at developing strategies to perform, as the information can be used to forecast future trends.

  
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					Deliberative Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Deliberative research is a technique used in market research which focuses on participants' views after they've had time to assess and think about the subject. Most research studies are performed with the expectation that they will get a raw, initial opinion from the customer; however, this is the opposite. When performing deliberative research, the participants are given a number of sources, all with different perspectives and sometimes in the form of a debate. It's after engaging with the sources, that the participant will express their views on the subject.

  

 Deliberative research is effective when used for policy consultation because it brings together many different viewpoints from the public, without making them rush into decisions. It also provides the opportunity to collect large amounts of data quickly and at a relatively low cost.

  

 On the other hand, it is hard to know for sure whether the participants have considered all the points being made to them and whether they're simply neglecting what the other participants say. Furthermore, the data collected from deliberative research is qualitative, making the analysis difficult and time-consuming.

  

 Deliberative research may also be conducted online, however this brings about different challenges. Being online means people have anonymity so they can feel confident in expressing extreme views. Researchers also have less control over the research study. In contrast, however, online deliberative research allows for many more participants to be in the debate, resulting in a wider range of opinions. There are also more people able to perform online deliberative research because of the ease of doing so from home.
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					Survey Stratification Research
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 Survey stratification is used when dividing up the overall population into smaller subpopulations, to help see different patterns in the data. Survey stratification should be used either before collecting the data or when you have data from different sources; but should always be used with consideration of which will have an effect on the results. 

  

 There are many ways to view survey stratification in tables and graphs. For example, if the researcher was looking at whether there is a correlation between the amount of pollution and the number of people becoming ill, you could put the data into a scatter graph. However, you can stratify the sample into ages, and make all the points of people under 20 with a triangle, all the people aged 20-50 with a square and all the people above 50 with a circle. This can make different patterns of data visible in order to gain better information.

  

 Survey stratification is effective at gaining more precise data and can obtain key characteristics in the population. However, it cannot be used in every study and the researcher must select a subpopulation for all the participants. It can be very challenging to find a selection of subgroups that fit all the participants. However, if the researcher does not manage this, the data may be deemed unreliable.
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					Website Research Survey
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 Website surveys are questionnaires used to gather a variety of different types of customer feedback about a website. Like any survey, the correct questions need to be asked in order to gain the most insight into what the customer thinks. The questionnaire is completed online but often on a different site to the one the survey will be about. There will be a link the participant can click on that takes them to the survey site.

  

 Website surveys are a lot faster than most other research methods and are considerably cheaper as well. Furthermore, with the survey being online, the participants enter their answer directly into the system, thus creating a reduced margin of error. However, website surveys often have respondent cooperation issues because the customers are frequently inundated with information from the internet. They are also conducted at the participant's pleasure, meaning the data received can be viewed as unreliable.

  

 Website surveys can access a vast amount of people in a short space of time. One commonly used method of performing a website survey is via email. The company will send out the link to the survey, or the actual survey, to their existing customers, accessing everyone that has an account involving their email. Similarly, the questionnaire can be sent out via text message to existing customers, if their account has a phone number instead of an email address.
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					Attitudes towards Covid-19 vaccine improving, finds global survey
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 Attitudes towards Covid-19 vaccine improving, finds global survey: A survey of people around the globe has found that in many countries, attitudes towards the Covid-19 vaccine are improving.
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					A third of UK manufacturing companies predict a challenging 2021 due to COVID and Brexit, finds poll
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 A third of UK manufacturing companies predict a challenging 2021 due to COVID and Brexit: A survey of UK manufacturing companies, aiming to uncover projections of the manufacturing industry in 2021, has found a third of businesses predict a difficult year for investments in the UK after Coronavirus and Brexit have obstructed trading. It also showed that 18% of companies think investments might improve over 2021. Many UK businesses have invested in digital technologies, new products and training in order to become more agile and attractive to possible investors, found the survey.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-UK-manufacturing-companies-predict-a-challenging-2021-due-to-COVID-and-Brexit-finds-poll-04811
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-UK-manufacturing-companies-predict-a-challenging-2021-due-to-COVID-and-Brexit-finds-poll-04811
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Over half Brits polled think teachers deciding pupil grades in 2021 due to Covid-19 is 'fair'
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Over half Brits polled think teachers deciding pupil grades due to Covid-19 is fair: A survey of people in the UK has found that more than half feel that teachers deciding the grades of their GCSE and A Level pupils where examinations cannot be sat due to the coronavirus pandemic, is 'fair'. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Over-half-Brits-polled-think-teachers-deciding-pupil-grades-in-2021-due-to-Covid-19-is-fair-04810
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Over-half-Brits-polled-think-teachers-deciding-pupil-grades-in-2021-due-to-Covid-19-is-fair-04810
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Property issues are barrier to delivering objectives for 45% of charities, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Property issues are barrier to delivering objectives for 45% of charities: A survey looking at the impact of property management on charities has found that 45% believe issues relating to property are a barrier to delivering their objectives. This has increased significantly over the last four years, from 30% in 2018 and 17% prior to that in 2016. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Property-issues-are-barrier-to-delivering-objectives-for-45percent-of-charities-according-to-poll-04809
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Property-issues-are-barrier-to-delivering-objectives-for-45percent-of-charities-according-to-poll-04809
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					71% of women do not fully follow their fitness regime during menstruation, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 71% of women do not fully follow their fitness regime during menstruation: A survey of women has found that seven out of 10 do not do as much exercise, or do not do any at all, during their period. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/71percent-of-women-do-not-fully-follow-their-fitness-regime-during-menstruation-reveals-survey-04808
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/71percent-of-women-do-not-fully-follow-their-fitness-regime-during-menstruation-reveals-survey-04808
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					67% of retailers that have invested in BOPIS services report increased sales volume last year, finds poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 67% of retailers who invested in BOPIS services in reported increased sales volume last year: A survey of retailers in the UK as well as the US has found that the brands able to perform well during the coronavirus pandemic were the ones that invested in operational infrastructure prior to the 2020 peak trading period. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/67percent-of-retailers-that-have-invested-in-BOPIS-services-report-increased-sales-volume-last-year-finds-poll-04807
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/67percent-of-retailers-that-have-invested-in-BOPIS-services-report-increased-sales-volume-last-year-finds-poll-04807
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					A quarter of young people believe that the coronavirus pandemic has 'destroyed' their career hopes, according to survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A quarter of young people believe that the coronavirus pandemic has 'destroyed' their career hopes: A new piece of research by the Prince's Trust has revealed the devastating impact of the coronavirus pandemic and the effect it has had on young people and their mental health.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-quarter-of-young-people-believe-that-the-coronavirus-pandemic-has-destroyed-their-career-hopes-according-to-survey-04798
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-quarter-of-young-people-believe-that-the-coronavirus-pandemic-has-destroyed-their-career-hopes-according-to-survey-04798
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					44 players in Professional Cricketers' Association survey have seen or experienced racism in the game, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 44 players in Professional Cricketers' Association survey have seen or experienced racism in the game: A survey by the PCA has found that 44 cricketers out of 174 surveyed (575 were invited to respond), have seen or have experienced racism in the game. Of those who had seen or experienced racism, 14 were from black, Asian and minority ethnic backgrounds (BAME).
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/44-players-in-Professional-Cricketers-Association-survey-have-seen-or-experienced-racism-in-the-game-according-to-poll-04791
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/44-players-in-Professional-Cricketers-Association-survey-have-seen-or-experienced-racism-in-the-game-according-to-poll-04791
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					A third of UK households are on a green-energy tariff, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A third of UK households are on a green-energy tariff: A survey of homeowners has revealed that just over a third (34%) are currently signed up their provider's green energy tariff.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-UK-households-are-on-a-green-energy-tariff-according-to-poll-04795
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-UK-households-are-on-a-green-energy-tariff-according-to-poll-04795
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					One in five parents do not permit their child to take part in sports outside of school, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 One in five parents do not permit their child to take part in sports outside of school: A survey has found that one in five parents do not allow their child to play sports outside of school, due to fears including injury risks or the costs involved.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/One-in-five-parents-do-not-permit-their-child-to-take-part-in-sports-outside-of-school-reveals-survey-04785
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/One-in-five-parents-do-not-permit-their-child-to-take-part-in-sports-outside-of-school-reveals-survey-04785
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					5% of SME companies could shut their doors for good this year, according to FSB poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 5% of SME companies could shut their doors for good this year: A survey conducted by the Federation of Small Businesses has revealed the ongoing struggle faced by small firms as a result of Covid-19 and warns that more than 250,000 small businesses are at risk of collapse if they go any longer without financial support from the government.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/5percent-of-SME-companies-could-shut-their-doors-for-good-this-year-according-to-FSB-poll-04804
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/5percent-of-SME-companies-could-shut-their-doors-for-good-this-year-according-to-FSB-poll-04804
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					73% of students are concerned about how they will manage financially as the country goes into lockdown again, reveals poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 73% of students are concerned about how they will manage financially as the country goes into lockdown again: A survey has found that as the UK goes back into lockdown, students are concerned about their financial stability as the coronavirus has impacted their income.  
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/73percent-of-students-are-concerned-about-how-they-will-manage-financially-as-the-country-goes-into-lockdown-again-reveals-poll-04784
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/73percent-of-students-are-concerned-about-how-they-will-manage-financially-as-the-country-goes-into-lockdown-again-reveals-poll-04784
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Majority of engineering firms admit they do not have the skills to reach net zero by 2050, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Majority of engineering firms admit they do not have the skills to reach net zero by 2050: A survey of engineering companies in the UK has revealed that just 7% of those polled believe they have the necessary skills to reach net-zero emissions by 2050.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Majority-of-engineering-firms-admit-they-do-not-have-the-skills-to-reach-net-zero-by-2050-according-to-poll-04793
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Majority-of-engineering-firms-admit-they-do-not-have-the-skills-to-reach-net-zero-by-2050-according-to-poll-04793
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Survey reveals greatest challenges faced by SMEs due to Covid-19
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey reveals greatest challenges faced by SMEs due to Covid-19: A survey of SMEs has highlighted the main challenges faced by a range of different sectors in 2020, as well as the predicted challenges for the year ahead.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-greatest-challenges-faced-by-SMEs-due-to-Covid-19-04803
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-greatest-challenges-faced-by-SMEs-due-to-Covid-19-04803
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					43% of charities say mental health and wellbeing will be a challenge in 2021, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 43% of charities say mental health and wellbeing will be a challenge in 2021: A survey of SME businesses has found that 43% of charities polled believe a key challenge for 2021 will be mental health and wellbeing, following the year-long pandemic. In other sectors this was also a concern including education (45%) and energy and utilities (36%).
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/43percent-of-charities-say-mental-health-and-wellbeing-will-be-a-challenge-in-2021-reveals-survey-04801
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/43percent-of-charities-say-mental-health-and-wellbeing-will-be-a-challenge-in-2021-reveals-survey-04801
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					A third of UK shoppers have stopped buying goods and services from EU since Brexit, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A third of UK shoppers have stopped buying goods and services from EU since Brexit: A survey of UK consumers has revealed that a little over a third of UK shoppers (34%) have stopped buying goods and services from the EU since the UK severed ties with the EU at the end of last year. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-UK-shoppers-have-stopped-buying-goods-and-services-from-EU-since-Brexit-reveals-survey-04799
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-UK-shoppers-have-stopped-buying-goods-and-services-from-EU-since-Brexit-reveals-survey-04799
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					A third of UK adults have travelled by train instead of a plane to their holiday destination to reduce carbon footprint, reveals poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A third of UK adults said they have travelled by train instead of a plane to their holiday destination to reduce carbon footprint: A survey has revealed that 32% of respondents polled have chosen to travel by train instead of plane to reach their travel destination, so as to reduce their carbon footprint.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-UK-adults-have-travelled-by-train-instead-of-a-plane-to-their-holiday-destination-to-reduce-carbon-footprint-reveals-poll-04797
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-UK-adults-have-travelled-by-train-instead-of-a-plane-to-their-holiday-destination-to-reduce-carbon-footprint-reveals-poll-04797
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					60% of UK adults would rent an electric vehicle on holiday to reduce their carbon footprint, reveals poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 60% of UK adults would rent an electric vehicle on holiday to reduce their carbon footprint: A survey of UK adults has found that 60% would rent an electric vehicle whilst on holiday to reduce their carbon footprint.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/60percent-of-UK-adults-would-rent-an-electric-vehicle-on-holiday-to-reduce-their-carbon-footprint-reveals-poll-04796
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/60percent-of-UK-adults-would-rent-an-electric-vehicle-on-holiday-to-reduce-their-carbon-footprint-reveals-poll-04796
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					61% of regular overseas holidaymakers expect to holiday abroad in summer 2021, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 61% of regular overseas holidaymakers expect to holiday abroad in summer 2021: A survey of holidaymakers has found that around 3 in 5 regular travellers expect that by summer 2021 they will be able to take an holiday overseas.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/61percent-of-regular-overseas-holidaymakers-expect-to-holiday-abroad-in-summer-2021-according-to-poll-04786
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/61percent-of-regular-overseas-holidaymakers-expect-to-holiday-abroad-in-summer-2021-according-to-poll-04786
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					One in 10 UK adults aged 18-34 years believe it is too late to stop the worst effects of climate change, according to survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 One in 10 UK adults aged 18-34 years believe it is too late to stop the worst effects of climate change: A survey looking at perceptions around climate change has found that one in 10 UK adults aged 18-34 believe that it's too late to avoid the worst effects of climate change.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/One-in-10-UK-adults-aged-18-34-years-believe-it-is-too-late-to-stop-the-worst-effects-of-climate-change-according-to-survey-04794
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/One-in-10-UK-adults-aged-18-34-years-believe-it-is-too-late-to-stop-the-worst-effects-of-climate-change-according-to-survey-04794
				</guid>
			</item>
		</channel>
	</rss>