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				<title>
					DJS Researchers to walk the 35-mile Gritstone Trail in ONE DAY for The Thomas Theyer Foundation
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Researchers-to-walk-the-35-mile-Gritstone-Trail-in-ONE-DAY-for-The-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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					Who let the dogs out - and then brought them to work! Bring Your Dog To Work Day comes to DJS Research
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Who-let-the-dogs-out-and-then-brought-them-to-work-Bring-Your-Dog-To-Work-Day-comes-to-DJS-Research
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					Introducing the Industry: A Tale of Work Experience at DJS Research...
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		A work experience placement at DJS Research offers students, or those who are thinking about a career change, the opportunity to get a feel for the market research industry and see what it's like to work at a busy agency. With no two days the same, students get to spend time with researchers, the creative and social media teams and with the telephone interviewing department to gain a real insight to what we do here - and hopefully learn a thing or two along the way! Last week we welcomed A Level student, Francesca, who excelled in every area she turned her hand to and has written a few words about her time with us...
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Introducing-the-Industry-A-Tale-of-Work-Experience-at-DJS-Research
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					All change for DJS Research commuters! Northern Rail offers additional stops at Strines Station after years of campaigning
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/All-change-for-DJS-Research-commuters-Northern-Rail-offers-additional-stops-at-Strines-Station-after-years-of-campaigning
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/All-change-for-DJS-Research-commuters-Northern-Rail-offers-additional-stops-at-Strines-Station-after-years-of-campaigning
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					Gen Z are a driving force in the current retail evolution climate
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		Written by Gill Redfern, Research Director. Contact Gill here
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Gen-Z-are-a-driving-force-in-the-current-retail-evolution-climate
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				<title>
					Calling Researchers With Experience Of Working Within The Culture Sector - We Are Recruiting!
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            Our culture team currently works with a wide variety of cultural and commercial visitor attractions, supporting them in understanding who their audiences are and using research to develop strategic plans. This includes us carrying out one of the largest research projects for a number of leading museums and galleries and lots of other exciting projects for culture and heritage clients.
        
        
        
            We are looking for researchers, ideally Research Managers, but other levels may also be considered, with experience of working in the culture sector; all-rounders, experienced, with both qualitative and quantitative skills, looking for a challenge and comfortable with working within a fast-paced and growing environment.
        
        
        
            If you are interested, please send us your details: Culture Market Research Job
        
    
    
    
        
             
        
    

    
    
		Get more DJS News: 
    
        Calling Researchers With Experience Of Working Within The Culture Sector - We Are Recruiting!
    
         
    
        DJS Research Joins BBC Market Research Framework
    
         
    
        Fast Fashion: can it work without harming our planet?    

				</description>
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					DJS Research Joins BBC Market Research Framework
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Joins-BBC-Market-Research-Framework
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Joins-BBC-Market-Research-Framework
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					Fast Fashion: can it work without harming our planet?
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Fast-Fashion-can-it-work-without-harming-our-planet
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					Will environmental consciousness change the direction of travel for delivery services in the UK?
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Will-environmental-consciousness-change-the-direction-of-travel-for-delivery-services-in-the-UK
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					Evolutionary Dear Consumer: The Future Face of Customer Loyalty
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Evolutionary-Dear-Consumer-The-Future-Face-of-Customer-Loyalty
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					Mixed consumer confidence for the year ahead as Brexit looms
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Mixed-consumer-confidence-for-the-year-ahead-as-Brexit-looms
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					DJS Research Ltd wins top UK contract for Cultural Market Research
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	We are thrilled to announce that DJS Research has been awarded one of the biggest contracts for cultural market research in the UK. Over the next four years, we will be working alongside some of the nation's leading museums and cultural venues to deliver transformative insight.  

	 

	We were awarded the sought-after contract following an extensive review and selection process which saw our researchers pitch to a prestigious consortium of 18 museums and cultural venues including The British Museum, National History Museum, Tate and VA (you can see the full list below).

	 

	The contract will see us conduct audience research for the consortium at sites across London as well as Manchester, Liverpool and St. Ives. 

	 

	

	
		Not only will our research help the consortium identify opportunities to further engage visitors, it will also help them navigate some of the wider challenges facing the cultural sector. 
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Ltd-wins-top-UK-contract-for-Cultural-Market-Research
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					Another Year Over: DJS Research Annual Review - 2018
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Another-Year-Over-DJS-Research-Annual-Review-2018
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Another-Year-Over-DJS-Research-Annual-Review-2018
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					DJS Research Get Up and Go this January for the Thomas Theyer Foundation
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Get-Up-and-Go-this-January-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Get-Up-and-Go-this-January-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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					Back of the net for DJS Research -  Winners at Football Business Awards 2018
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		Huge celebrations are in order for DJS Research and Leicester City Football Club who together have scooped the award for The Best Fan Engagement Programme at the Football Business Awards 2018.
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Back-of-the-net-for-DJS-Research-Winners-at-Football-Business-Awards-2018
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Back-of-the-net-for-DJS-Research-Winners-at-Football-Business-Awards-2018
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					DJS Senior Research Manager first ever alumna to be invited to tutor at Research Academy
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Senior-Research-Manager-first-ever-alumna-to-be-invited-to-tutor-at-Research-Academy
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					Market Research Jobs at DJS Research – check out our latest exciting roles!
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				<description>
					
	Want to further your career in Market Research? Fancy being part of a dynamic, forward-thinking, creative and (most of all) fun team? You're in luck as we're currently recruiting! We have a number of exciting opportunities at both our Stockport and new Leeds offices. 

	 

	Come grow with us – a rewarding career at DJS Research

	 

	Since first opening our doors back in 2001 in Stockport, Cheshire, DJS Research has continued its year-on-year growth – and we're now one of the leading market research agencies in the North West. We've also been named as 'One to Watch' by The Market Research Society in its Research Live Industry Report. 

	 

	Just last year we opened a second office (as we were getting pretty full in Stockport!) – just over the Pennines in lovely Leeds. Our sister office will give us the space needed to continue our company expansion as well as continue to attract some of the hottest talent in the country.

	 

	"It's a really exciting time to join DJS Research", said Managing Director, Danny Sims. "The new Leeds office means we can continue our company growth and offer clients a fantastic market research package with some of the top researchers in the industry."  

	 

	Fancy knowing a little more? We're currently looking for talented researchers to join our friendly team. 

	

	Market Research Jobs in Leeds and Stockport

	 

	Whether you're a budding researcher looking for a new challenge or a telephone interviewer with a talent for getting the best from respondents - we want to hear from you! Current job opportunities include Data Executive, Field Executive and Senior Field Executive, Researchers at various levels and Telephone Interviewers – many of which are available at our Leeds or Stockport offices. 

	 

	If you have a passion for research and want to take the next step in your career, take a look at our current market research jobs and drop us a line! 

	 

	
		Get more DJS News: 
	
		DJS Research nominated at the Sports Business Awards 2018 - alongside Leicester City FC!
	
		 
	
		Rise of the machines: Adopting AI and its impact on skills in the research industry
	
		 
	
		Jenna Allen, Research Director, joins DJS Research


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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Market-Research-Jobs-at-DJS-Research-check-out-our-latest-exciting-roles
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					Some learnings from one of this year's Behavioural Science-based Beesley Lectures
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		Written by Alex McCluckie, Associate Director. Contact Alex here
	
		 
	
		
	
		Nudging the water sector towards a brighter future?
	
		Behavioural science and the water sector are two, once disparate areas, that are slowly becoming better acquainted with each other. Given the great impact that behavioural science has been having over the past few years (as evidenced by the Behavioural Insights Team or "Nudge Unit"), this article's first sentence I would hope will be encouraging to many that work in the industry. To try and investigate further how behavioural science could be leveraged for the good of the water sector, on Wednesday the 10th of October, I jetted off from Manchester down to the Institute of Directors in London to attend one of this year's Beesley Lectures, succinctly titled: Behavioural science in water and energy markets: lessons for evidence-based policy making. 
	
		 
	
		The night was chaired by Dr Xeni Dassiou of City, University of London with the star attraction being a lecture given by Professor Robert Hahn from the University of Oxford. 
	
		 
	
		As appears to be customary at the conferences and speaking events I have attended of late, the session began with a quick overview of behavioural economics and its Nobel-winning popularisers, Kahneman and Thaler. After bringing everyone up to speed, however, Professor Hahn jumped straight into some meaty examples of nudges using real-world examples and demonstrated how insights from this exciting sphere have been harnessed across numerous areas within both water and energy.
	
		 
	
		Whilst it wasn't an all-encompassing overview of what can influence behaviour, part of the session did provide an interesting examination of some of the ways that Hahn's own field experiments have been altering behaviour, with the key tenet for this portion of the talk being that information matters! Indeed, as I have seen from my own work in the water industry, from asking customers about how acceptable they deem their water company's proposed plans for the next five years to be, to their willingness to support a social tariff, how information is framed can make such a difference. Let's take a look at some of Professor Hahn's examples...
	
		 
	
		Some work undertaken on behalf of British Gas that sought to understand how best to get people to take up smart meters provided support for the view that neoclassical economics doesn't always ring true. In this example, the researchers offered a randomly selected group of people a £5 voucher and a second randomly selected group of people a £10 voucher to take up a smart meter. Now firstly, it should be noted that these two monetary incentives resulted in a difference compared to the baseline (that is to say that the offer of a cash incentive did increase people's likelihood to take up smart meters) - nothing overly surprising there I hear you say! What was interesting however was the finding that there was absolutely no difference between the amount of take up between the two amounts, something that is contradictory to what classical economics would teach us; that we should expect more people to take up smart meters with the higher incentive. Now, why is this first snippet of information interesting? Well, imagine you are the operations manager for your water or energy company who yourself is attempting to increase the uptake of smart meters. Falsely assuming that doubling the monetary incentive would double (or at least relatively increase) the take up of meters would lead to a tremendous waste of money that could otherwise be put to great use elsewhere in the business! Can you think of a better example of why experimentation when planning an intervention is crucial?!
	
		 
	
		I should make clear, behavioural science isn't about throwing money at problems. It is about recognising that there are a number of mental biases that human beings tend to succumb to and that these biases can be utilised. One such way of doing this is by presenting people with information that is framed in ways that play on these biases.
	
		 
	
		For clarity's sake, let's take a closer look at two of these now:
	
		 
	
		bull; Loss aversion: is the principle that people react to losses more strongly than gains and they try to prevent losses more than they try to make gains.
	
		 
	
		bull; Social norms: is the principle that people want to be like everyone else and are heavily influenced by what they perceive everyone else is doing. 
	
		 
	
		These two biases have been utilised to influence people to behave in different ways across a range of sectors and industries and here Hahn demonstrated their power in the water sector specifically. 
	
		 
	
		The City of San Antonio, Texas wanted to motivate people to take up rebates for drought-resistant landscaping. To do this, they sent out letters that were framed in different ways but which utilised the aforementioned biases. For instance, asking people to take up an offer of drought-resistant landscaping because they are using more water than their neighbours uses a social norm frame which is different to asking people to take up an offer of drought-resistant landscaping because if they don't, they will lose this offer and by the way this is what your neighbours are doing in terms of consumption, which uses both the social norm frame and the loss frame. Interestingly, the combination of a social comparison and loss framing led to a 36% increase in take up of the offer relative to a benchmark letter that had neither framing effect applied!  Now there are a whole host of other fascinating titbits from this study that time and space restraints won't let me dive into here, such as how social norms alone may play better in some domains whilst loss frames alone may play better in others. However, I have included a link to the article here and I urge you to follow this up because it makes for some really interesting reading.
	
		 
	
		So what is the point here? Well, on the one hand, there is the fact that we know there are certain interventions that can lead to changes in people's behaviour and that the recognition and utilisation of various mental biases can help facilitate such changes. However, I think there is a broader point here and that is that experimentation and evaluation are key. Notice that the two examples I detail above each had a control plus various experimentation groups which due to the randomised design adopted allowed for a direct comparison of cause and effect that otherwise would have been lost. If you're thinking this is something of a 'stating the obvious' type of moment, then spare a thought for California... 
	
		 
	
		In 2015 California was in the sways of a worrying drought. So much so in fact that the Governor, in an attempt to sort this problem out, set about trying to achieve a 25% reduction in water usage by, amongst other costly things, adopting a turf removal programme. Now, these initiatives resulted in the Governor largely meeting his goal, however, there was a problem; there was almost no evaluation or experimentation of the effectiveness of these various programmes undertaken. What this meant was that they were effectively blind as to what worked best and what would work best should a new crisis/drought strike. As Hahn pointed out, it seems that this episode holds true to the phrase coined by Stanford economist Paul Romer: a crisis is a terrible thing to waste! 
	
		 
	
		So, have we found a solution to the myriad issues currently facing the industry?
	
		 
	
		Through experimentation and evaluation, can we slowly begin to form a perfect industry operating in the most efficient and optimum way imaginable? Really, the answer is no, at least not yet. It has been recognised for some time that different nudges work on different margins (although why this is the case is something that we're still trying to learn more about). The truth is, there is no complete theory of human decision making, but we are developing a toolkit that is growing stronger with time. 
	
		 
	
		Indeed, I am conscious that this article thus far has been relatively glowing about behavioural science's possibilities and I feel that in the name of balance it is only right to cover some of the gripes brought to the fore by the audience too. In fact, given the buzz that often follows any discussion of behavioural science and its potential impact, it was interesting to hear a couple of audience members question its usage given that its effects are often quoted as delivering relatively small percentage changes in whatever the target behaviour may be. This even led to a discussion around whether or not behavioural science's effects are at times oversold. Well, as Alex Plant of Anglian Water pointed out, small effects across a large population are probably still worth having and given that running such experimentation to establish how these small effects can best be brought about through skilfully crafted nudges is relatively inexpensive, they can still be well worth the effort.
	
		 
	
		Alex, in his role as respondent for the night's discussion, did provide a well thought through response to Professor Hahn's talk in which he held strong to the belief that we maybe shouldn't be drawn moth-like to the shimmering flame of behavioural science at the expense of traditional economics altogether. Rather, he claimed, we should think about those key tenets of competition regulation theory that have served us well in the past as, he claims, companies will still tend to act in economically rational ways. Policies that recognise this along with incentive-based regulation will still drive efficiency and can drive innovation in ways that deliver for all customers regardless of underpinning sub-optimum choices that may be being made by customers at the individual level.
	
		 
	
		And so to conclude, born out of a realisation that neoclassical economics needed a fundamental re-think, behavioural science does offer insights into how people can be nudged into behaving in ways that are 'good', however that may be defined, whether that be for themselves, the environment or society. 
	
		 
	
		It is well recognised that nudges have been working well in numerous areas of society and I see there to be no reason why behavioural science, if deployed effectively cannot play a really important role in promoting outcomes that are in the public interest in the water (and energy) industry. 
	
		 
	
		Indeed, as we are faced with the growing challenges of population growth and climate change, the fundamentals of evidenced-based policy are only going to increase, in both their appeal and their importance from initial diagnosis, to experimenting with RCTs and studying your outcomes through adequate evaluation and then looping back round to diagnosis. So, whilst no panacea, armed with the growing learnings from behavioural science, we are certainly entering into an incredibly exciting time within the industry of which we are only just beginning to scratch the surface of what seems, at least for now, to be vast possibilities. 
	
		 
	
		 
	
		 


	Get more DJS News: 

	It was the best of climbs, it was the worst of climbs: A Tale of Three Peaks

	 

	Research Executives to complete Market Research Society Advanced Certificate

	 

	DJS Research proud to announce new Charity of the Year

				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Some-learnings-from-one-of-this-years-Behavioural-Science-based-Beesley-Lectures
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					It was the best of climbs, it was the worst of climbs: A Tale of Three Peaks
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		By James Hinde, Research Director, email: jhinde@djsresearch.com
	
		DJS walk the Yorkshire Three Peaks to raise money for the Thomas Theyer foundation...
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/It-was-the-best-of-climbs-it-was-the-worst-of-climbs-A-Tale-of-Three-Peaks
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					Research Executives to complete Market Research Society Advanced Certificate
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		As a company, we always seek to invest in our staff to help them gain new skills, learn more about the industry and help them on their journey to further developing their market research careers. 
	
		 
	
		We have recently enrolled six of our Research Executives and Junior Research Executives on the MRS Advanced Certificate course with the Research Academy to develop their knowledge of market research and gain a solid grounding in research methods and practice as well as working towards an industry recognised degree-level vocational qualification. 
	
		 
	
		The course, which takes up to six months to complete, will ensure they receive the very best training to the highest MRS standard. And as they complete it alongside their daily DJS role, they can begin to apply the theory being taught to real-life situations encountered in the workplace.
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Learning with The Research Academy 
	
		 
	
		DJS has chosen to use the Research Academy to help our researchers gain their new qualifications because of its passion for research and teaching and also at the recommendation of our Senior Research Manager, Rebecca Green, who is a Research Academy tutor for the post-grad diploma. 
	
		 
	
		Rebecca, who joined DJS Research in June was awarded the MRS Diploma in 2017 and impressed her Research Academy tutors so much, was invited shortly after to switch sides and help others undertaking the course. 
	
		 
	
		She believes enrolling Research Execs on the Advanced Certificate course will enable them to go far beyond mere technical learning, exposing them to a range of industry experts and enabling them to help each other throughout their learning journey.  
	
		
			"I think it's great that DJS is committing themselves to a course like this," she said.   
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Research-Executives-to-complete-Market-Research-Society-Advanced-Certificate
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Research-Executives-to-complete-Market-Research-Society-Advanced-Certificate
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					Kids Market Research
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				<description>
					
 DJS Research has years of experience conducting market research with kids, through ChatterZone, our kids market research panel.
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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					Visitor Experience Research
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				<description>
					
 Visitor experience research is a term for a specific form of market research, focussed around the experience of visitors. Typically this would focus on satisfaction, likelihood to recommend, any specific parts of the attraction that were visited and feedback on these - for instance a sepcific exhibition within a museum or gallery, or a specific ride at a theme park.
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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					Market research panels paid
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A market research panel is a group of people who have all signed up to take part in market research, such as surveys, focus groups, etc.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Online focus groups
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Online focus groups are a based on the principles of the traditional focus group research method however they are conducted online, allowing for a dispersed geographic spread which is normally not possible with a face to face focus group.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Paid focus groups
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Focus groups are a research method which involves the use of participants in a roundtable-like discussion where opinions can be expressed regarding a certain product or service. This can then be used to make almost immediate adjustments.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Paid survey sites
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey sites can provide a great introductory way to make money online and is usually a more immediate way of generating income compared to other online money-making methods.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Paid surveys at home
				</title>
				<description>
					
 The way in which participants complete surveys has changed with the growth in technology. Traditional methods used to include postal surveys and face to face surveys completed on location with little incentive.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Get paid to do surveys
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Earning extra cash for surveys is probably one of the most common forms of making easy money.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Paid research studies
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Paid research studies come in many forms from incentivised online surveys to paid clinical trials. They are designed as a way to gauge the market and for companies to ensure they are targeting the right audiences and testing the effectiveness of their products.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Get paid for online surveys
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Over the past few years, businesses have started to utilise surveys in various different formats and offer payments to the people that wish to take part.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Take surveys for money
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Surveys are not just done on a free basis, businesses have started to recognise the importance of customer opinions and are now offering money incentives to participate.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Get paid for surveys
				</title>
				<description>
					
  Answering a few questions has not been easier – especially when you can get paid for participating in surveys.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Get paid to take surveys
				</title>
				<description>
					
 There are lots of easy ways to make money, but getting paid to take part in surveys is by far the easiest.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Online surveys for money
				</title>
				<description>
					
 http://www.djsresearch.co.uk./insightpanelParticipants are now able to complete surveys online for cash incentives. It has become a lucrative market with many companies enticing participants with the reward of 'getting paid' for completing surveys online.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Paid Online Surveys
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Paid online surveys are becoming more prevalent in the emerging era of information technology that we live in today. Online surveys are hosted via the internet with the promise of a paid incentive in return for completion of the survey. They yield a greater scale of response, as they are much more accessible and distributable compared to traditions survey methods.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Paid Surveys
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Paid surveys are an incentivised form of statistical survey where participants are compensated for their partaking and completion of a survey. The payment usually comes in the form of a cash incentive and can involve both qualitative and quantitative methods.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Pet Market Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 In market research, pet market research includes research with pet owners, pet retail firms, pet brands and pet charities, across both the private and third sector. This can include anyone who owns a pet, whether it a cat, dog, or horse, to those that work with animals or sell products retailed to pets and their owners.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Paid Market Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Paid Market Research is sometimes offered as a thank you for participating in research projects.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Consumer Panel Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Consumer panel research refers to a market research methodology which utilises consumer panels in order to quickly and efficiently understand the prevailing views of a group - whether that be a specific group of consumers (such as over-50s), consumers in a geographic location or members of more specific group. Although members of a 'panel', those in the latter group would often be referred to as a specific panel type; for instance, VoicED is a teacher panel owned and operated by DJS Research and only accepts teachers and education professionals, and we also have our own insight panel for consumers and other respondents which you can sign up to if you wish.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Value Assessment Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Value Assessment Research allows companies to assess the worth of a new product or service before it is introduced to the market. By conducting this type of research, companies can gauge whether or not there is a) a need for the product and b) a demand for the product. Long-term, Value Assessment Research can potentially save companies vast amounts of money and face by declaring whether or not a product or service is marketable, before it hits the shelves.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Men are more likely to think about what a brand says about them than women, suggests poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Men are more likely to think about what a brand says about them than women: A survey for New Macho, part of brand agency, BBD Perfect Storm, looking at the extent to which FMCG brands reflect a person's values suggests that men are almost twice as likely to consider what a brand says about them as a person, than women are.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Men-are-more-likely-to-think-about-what-a-brand-says-about-them-than-women-suggests-poll-04384
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Men-are-more-likely-to-think-about-what-a-brand-says-about-them-than-women-suggests-poll-04384
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					64% of FMCG shoppers open to trying a new brand, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 64% of FMCG shoppers open to trying a new brand: A recent survey has found that 64% of FMCG shoppers are open to trying a new brand. The research also found that FMCG shoppers are most loyal to their grocery brand with 41% sticking with their favourite for over eight years.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/64percent-of-FMCG-shoppers-open-to-trying-a-new-brand-reveals-survey-04407
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/64percent-of-FMCG-shoppers-open-to-trying-a-new-brand-reveals-survey-04407
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					43% of primary schools 'unconfident' in their approach to online safety, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 43% of primary schools 'unconfident' in their approach to online safety: A poll of 1,158 primary and secondary school staff undertaken by RM Education - in association with the NSPCC - found that when it comes to online safety, 43% of respondents at primary schools and 32% of those at secondary schools, were not confident in their school's approach.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/43percent-of-primary-schools-unconfident-in-their-approach-to-online-safety-according-to-poll-04413
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/43percent-of-primary-schools-unconfident-in-their-approach-to-online-safety-according-to-poll-04413
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Less than half parents polled are aware physical activity can boost self-confidence in kids
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Less than half parents polled are aware physical activity can boost self-confidence in kids: A survey looking at attitudes towards physical activity - for Change4Life and Disney UK - has revealed that less than half (49%) parents in England are aware that their children can improve self-confidence through taking part in physical activity. A similar number (48%) were also unaware that physical activity can reduce anxiety as well as improve their self esteem (47%).
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Less-than-half-parents-polled-are-aware-physical-activity-can-boost-self-confidence-in-kids-04412
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Less-than-half-parents-polled-are-aware-physical-activity-can-boost-self-confidence-in-kids-04412
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					No summer holiday for 1 in 5 UK families this year, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 No summer holiday for 1 in 5 UK families this year, according to poll: A recent survey has found that a fifth of families in the UK will be going without a summer holiday this year. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/No-summer-holiday-for-1-in-5-UK-families-this-year-according-to-poll-04411
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/No-summer-holiday-for-1-in-5-UK-families-this-year-according-to-poll-04411
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Brexit affecting headcount in manufacturing, reveals poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Brexit affecting headcount in manufacturing: A survey of UK engineering and manufacturing respondents has found that a third of those polled have suspended or decreased their headcount due to Brexit.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Brexit-affecting-headcount-in-manufacturing-reveals-poll-04365
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Brexit-affecting-headcount-in-manufacturing-reveals-poll-04365
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					87% of mining businesses say their cyber-security could be stronger, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 87% of mining businesses say their cyber-security could be stronger: A survey of businesses across the mining sector has revealed that the majority (87%) believe that their processes to thwart cyber attacks could be more robust. Slightly fewer respondents (84%) also said that more could be done within their company to prevent the mishandling of data. More than three-quarters (79%) said that introducing Industry Internet of Things solutions (IIoT) is essential if they want to have an advantage over competitors.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/87percent-of-mining-businesses-say-their-cyber-security-could-be-stronger-according-to-poll-04401
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/87percent-of-mining-businesses-say-their-cyber-security-could-be-stronger-according-to-poll-04401
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					British Chambers of Commerce survey points to manufacturing slowdown
				</title>
				<description>
					
 
  British Chambers of Commerce survey points to manufacturing slowdown: A major survey of over 6,800 UK businesses has found UK manufacturing growth is at its lowest level in years.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/British-Chambers-of-Commerce-survey-points-to-manufacturing-slowdown-04402
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/British-Chambers-of-Commerce-survey-points-to-manufacturing-slowdown-04402
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Survey reveals moving house is most stressful life challenge
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey reveals moving house is most stressful life challenge: Amongst the many challenges a person will face throughout their time on planet Earth, none are as stressful as moving house; that's according to a recent survey of UK homeowners.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-moving-house-is-most-stressful-life-challenge-04343
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-moving-house-is-most-stressful-life-challenge-04343
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Eight in ten housing association workers have experienced work-related stress, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Eight in ten housing association employees have experienced work-related stress: A survey conducted on behalf of the Unite the Union has found that 80% of housing association workers across England and Wales have experienced stress relating to their work. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Eight-in-ten-housing-association-workers-have-experienced-work-related-stress-according-to-poll-04410
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Eight-in-ten-housing-association-workers-have-experienced-work-related-stress-according-to-poll-04410
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					31% supply teachers cite workload in permanent posts as top reason for switch, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 31% supply teachers cite workload in permanent posts as top reason for switch: A survey has found that the main reason why teachers left permanent posts in favour of supply teaching was because of workloads.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/31percent-supply-teachers-cite-workload-in-permanent-posts-as-top-reason-for-switch-according-to-poll-04405
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/31percent-supply-teachers-cite-workload-in-permanent-posts-as-top-reason-for-switch-according-to-poll-04405
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					58% of Conservative Party members in favour of death penalty for certain crimes, reveals poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 58% of Conservative Party members in favour of death penalty for certain crimes: A survey of Conservative Party members commissioned for Channel 4's Dispatches programme has revealed 58% wouuld be in favour of reinstating capital punishment for some crimes. A further 37% said that they would not be in support of bringing back the death penalty, which was abolished in Great Britain in 1965 and in Northern Ireland in 1973. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/58percent-of-Conservative-Party-members-in-favour-of-death-penalty-for-certain-crimes-reveals-poll-04409
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/58percent-of-Conservative-Party-members-in-favour-of-death-penalty-for-certain-crimes-reveals-poll-04409
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Government should pay TV licence for over-75s, according to three-quarters of voters polled in survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Government should pay TV licence for over-75s, according to three-quarters of voters polled in survey: A survey by charity, Age UK has found that three-quarters of respondents believe that the Government should take back responsibility for paying the licence fee for pensioners over the age of 75 - and not the BBC.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Government-should-pay-TV-licence-for-over-75s-according-to-three-quarters-of-voters-polled-in-survey-04408
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Government-should-pay-TV-licence-for-over-75s-according-to-three-quarters-of-voters-polled-in-survey-04408
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					58% of museum front-of-house staff feel undervalued, reveals poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 58% of museum front-of-house staff feel undervalued:  A poll of museum workers has found that 58% of those in front-of-house roles feel undervalued in their work.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/58percent-of-museum-front-of-house-staff-feel-undervalued-reveals-poll-04406
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/58percent-of-museum-front-of-house-staff-feel-undervalued-reveals-poll-04406
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Cost of products 17% more expensive in Duty Free, according to poll.
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Cost of products 17% more expensive in Duty Free: A survey looking into the prices consumers pay at duty free shops compared to the high street or online has revealed shoppers may be paying much more for what they might assume are better value goods.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Cost-of-products-17percent-more-expensive-in-Duty-Free-according-to-poll-04403
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Cost-of-products-17percent-more-expensive-in-Duty-Free-according-to-poll-04403
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Cost of technology is top challenge for healthcare organisations, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Cost of technology is top challenge for healthcare organisations: A report polling doctors, nurses and other health professionals in primary, secondary and community care has found that more than half (55.7%) believe that the cost of technology is holding back their organisation. It also found that over a third (35%) think that it will take at least a decade before their organisation is fully digital and paper-free.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Cost-of-technology-is-top-challenge-for-healthcare-organisations-according-to-poll-04404
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Cost-of-technology-is-top-challenge-for-healthcare-organisations-according-to-poll-04404
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Survey reveals fall in levels of satisfaction among NHS hospital inpatients
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey reveals fall in levels of satisfaction among NHS hospital inpatients: An annual survey of inpatients at NHS hospitals has revealed that satisfaction levels have fallen.  
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-fall-in-levels-of-satisfaction-among-NHS-hospital-inpatients-04397
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-fall-in-levels-of-satisfaction-among-NHS-hospital-inpatients-04397
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Salaries for professionally registered engineers are higher, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Salaries for professionally registered engineers are higher: Research into the salaries of engineers and technicians has revealed that professionally registered employees report higher salaries on average than their unregistered counterparts.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Salaries-for-professionally-registered-engineers-are-higher-finds-survey-04400
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Salaries-for-professionally-registered-engineers-are-higher-finds-survey-04400
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Majority of MPs believe dementia care should be funded by the state, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Majority of MPs believe dementia care should be funded by the state: ,
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Majority-of-MPs-believe-dementia-care-should-be-funded-by-the-state-according-to-poll-04399
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Majority-of-MPs-believe-dementia-care-should-be-funded-by-the-state-according-to-poll-04399
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Survey suggests landlords in the UK are confused over  new letting rules
				</title>
				<description>
					
  Survey suggests landlords in the UK are confused over new letting rules: A survey of 400 UK landlords has revealed that despite legislation to reform the letting market being introduced, many have a lack of understanding around some of the details - or are completely in the dark. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-suggests-landlords-in-the-UK-are-confused-over-new-letting-rules-04398
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-suggests-landlords-in-the-UK-are-confused-over-new-letting-rules-04398
				</guid>
			</item>
		</channel>
	</rss>