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				<title>
					Could sensehacking help 'lower the bar' in the battle for positive behaviour change?
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Could-sensehacking-help-lower-the-bar-in-the-battle-for-positive-behaviour-change
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				<title>
					DJS celebrates becoming employee-owned at 20th birthday party!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		  
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-celebrates-becoming-employee-owned-at-20th-birthday-party
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				<title>
					We're hiring! Come and join our growing employee-owned market research agency!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		  
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Were-hiring-Come-and-join-our-growing-employee-owned-market-research-agency
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				<title>
					A towering success!  DJS' big day out to Blackpool
				</title>
				<description>
					
	

	
		 
	
		Didn't we have a lovely time, the day we went to Blackpool...
	
		Roller coasters, fish and chips, 2p machines and the best of British weather; the last Friday in September marked our first company-wide outing to the great Lancashire seaside town famed for its Victorian Tower, donkey rides and sticks of peppermint rock.
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				<title>
					Searching for meaning: a tongue in cheek look at trends on Trends
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
	
		Written by Elliot Simmonds, Associate Director. Email Elliot
	
		 
	
		One of the great things about the modern era is the availability of information – both to us as individual consumers, but also to those of us whose job it is to distil information down in to meaning. And by 'meaning', I mean a collection of charts which illustrate some things I find interesting or amusing. If you've come for hard-hitting analysis and insight, you're probably best reading something from Alex McCluckie.
	
		 
	
		Despite its many ills, one perceived 'positive' aspect of COVID-19, at least originally, was the opportunity to slow-down, spend some time doing those things we had always meant to do, and maybe improve ourselves as human beings a little bit. Blog posts abound on the topic. Course delivery and educational sites downed their paywalls, Audible by Amazon is giving away free digital versions of audio book classics you've always wanted to read, but never have (Paradise Lost, anyone?) and Joe Wicks is going to turn you in to an Adonis, you Adonis.[1]
	
		 
	
		At least that was the plan. But our habits are, for the most part, difficult to break - and I wanted to explore a little bit of what we'd really been getting up to. There's a lot of survey data knocking about on the topic already, and so another COVID-19 Tracker felt like one too many - although, if you are specifically interested in a culture audience, please drop me an email. 
	
		 
	
		As a free data source, with a fairly large sample size, Google Trends isn't a bad place to start. Whilst my initial focus was on habits, this quickly descended in to 'interesting stuff' and what follows is a fairly loosely connected examination of some of the things we in the UK have been searching for on Google - I hope you find it interesting, enlightening and, in some cases, amusing, in equal measure.[2]
	
		 
	
		Health and leisure
	
		Starting with that quest for fitness, we saw an initial clamour for multi-gyms which was at a five-year high.
	
		 
	
		


	 

	However, the fitness craze quickly began to drop off:

	 

	

	 

	
		And we turned to other priorities:
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		The laying of patio actually comes from personal experience - at least three members of my close friendship group (yep, 60%) have undertaken some sort of landscaping project and, generally, with a great deal of success. Given one of them is a Chartered Surveyor, this feels like the minimum expectation. 
	
		 
	
		Nevertheless, despite the rise in physical activity (it's laying a patio specifically, not searching for someone to lay a patio for you), on Saturdays, some things stayed broadly the same...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...but we also also added a more social element, in lieu of being able to go out...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...though unfortunately, in film and in hygiene, American cultural hegemony remains: [3]
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Education
	
		Thankfully (especially given the above), education remained a serious consideration, particularly early on:
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		 
	
		However, both those with primary and secondary age children alike struggled with certain aspects...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...with inevitable results...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Opportunities lost, opportunities gained...
	
		 
	
		Importantly, we quickly understood that the situation wasn't one we could get away from...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...and whilst some of us put off big decisions as a result...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...some of us saw an opportunity to improve our future.
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Others, saw an opportunity to experience something...new. That said, it's heart-warming to see a handful (excuse the pun) of early adopters in January. 
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Closing thoughts
	
		Encouragingly, some of us started to realise what was important...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...and what, perhaps, wasn't.
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		But more people than ever, were asking the most important question of all:
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
	
		 
	
		Notes:
	
		[1] I have absolutely no connection with Amazon aside from being a customer, but I think this is such a superb offer I've linked to it here: https://stories.audible.com/discovery/enterprise-discovery-21122353011?ref=adbl_ent_anon_ds_ds_dccs_sbtp-0-5
	
		 
	
		[2] It's important to note a couple of caveats here - the first being that this is purely data from Google, and whilst Google has a huge share of the search market, it isn't 100%. The other, is the charts above show relative figures on an index across a set time period (see X-axis for all charts) - they do not show volume per se and one chart is not comparable with another. Whilst Google says...
	
		 
	
		Google Trends does filter out some types of searches, such as:
	
		 
	
		bull; Searches made by very few people: Trends only shows data for popular terms, so search terms with low volume appear as "0"
	
		 
	
		...it does not provide figures around search volume - so we don't know whether the difference between a score of 100 vs. 25 is 100,000,000 vs. 25,000,000 or whether it is 100,000 vs. 25,000. That said, I'd argue the relative change is more interesting than the absolute change anyway.
	
		 
	
		If you want to understand a little more about Google Trends and the data it includes, there's a link here:
	
		 
	
		https://support.google.com/trends/answer/4365533?hl=en
	
		 
	
		[3] Very interested to know the cause of the August 2019 spike here...any thoughts?
	
		 


	


	 

	Get more DJS News: 

	Healthwatch publishes our research looking at young people's experiences of mental healthcare

	 

	For the Love of Scrubs: What I did with my DJS Volunteering Day...

	 

	When everyone is busy being objectively similar, try cultivating your subjective difference...

				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Searching-for-meaning-a-tongue-in-cheek-look-at-trends-on-Trends
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				<title>
					Jack went to Poland: What I did with my DJS volunteering day...
				</title>
				<description>
					
	

	Written by Jack Watson, Research Manager

	 

	For nine months in 2016, I lived and worked in Poland completing something known then as European Voluntary Service (EVS). The programme is little-known in the UK, but enables all young people legally resident in Europe, aged between 18 and 30, to carry out an international volunteer service for NGOs, charities, or public bodies for a period ranging from two to 12 months. The only other prerequisite is that the volunteering must be done outside of your home nation. 

	 

	Before starting my research career, I wanted to live somewhere outside of the UK and this provided a unique opportunity to come into contact with a different culture and acquire new skills and abilities that would be useful for my personal and professional growth upon my return. I jumped at the chance then to go and live with four other volunteers from France, Portugal and Macedonia, where we worked in a local volunteer centre in the city of Kielce.  

	

	 

	As well as being involved in the organisation of 'International Evenings' that brought together volunteers, local students and Erasmus students, I ran weekly workshops in Communicative English and a Current Affairs discussion through a programme called Przystanek M?odych, or 'Bus Stop for Youth', which provided a free learning platform for local residents in our city, and visited local schools and universities for cultural exchange sessions and discussions on the value of volunteer work. A proudest achievement was organising a 'Human Library', where people were 'books' that you could rent out for 15-minute discussions about anything and everything to do with that person, hopefully broadening the minds of those who came along to talk and learn.

	 

	Earlier this year, before the nationwide lockdown, I was invited to return to Poland to attend a week-long conference and evaluation meeting alongside other former-volunteers because in 2018, the EVS programme was replaced by something new, called European Solidarity Corps (ESC). The overall aims of the week were to think about how better to promote ESC projects amongst young people and how to encourage and prepare volunteers to participate in them. Once a volunteer arrives, it can sometimes feel like quite a daunting experience to be dropped in an entirely different country, so we also discussed how to manage a group of international volunteers well and how to maintain motivation and commitment to these longer-term projects. 

	 

	An amazing thing about working at DJS Research is that they provide you with one day a year to volunteer for something close to your heart. My nine months in Poland were a very formative experience for me and helped shape my openness and tolerance to anyone and everyone, so I was delighted to be able to use this volunteer day (alongside some annual leave!) to head back to Kielce and discuss the merits of the programme amongst like-minded people. I'm sure everyone at DJS Research is excited to be able to use their volunteer day in the coming months as the world starts to open up a bit more; I was just lucky enough to be able to use mine right before lockdown began!

	 

	It also felt important for me to attend the conference because the UK's participation in these multinational projects is under threat as they are partly funded by Erasmus, a scheme which might end in the UK when the transition period of leaving the EU is over. COVID-19 has obviously thrown another small spanner in the works with regards to international travel but I wanted to write this blog post to highlight the fact that free travel and work opportunities are still available.  

	

	 

	If you have siblings, nieces, nephews, children who are unsure of their next steps... If you personally feel like a completely new and different challenge, then take a look at what alternative options are available to you. Living in Poland changed my outlook on life. Although I had free accommodation and local travel, I survived (and thrived) on euro;180 each month and met some lifelong friends who still today remain important people in my life. Every volunteer project is different, read up about them, find something you love the sound of and apply! There are short-term projects available through the ESC programme too for those who feel more constrained by time. It's a big world out there; we should definitely take the opportunity to explore it!

	Get more DJS News: 

	Our contribution during the Covid-19 crisis

	 

	Confirmation Bias, Market Research and Dominic Cummings

	 

	Searching for meaning: a tongue in cheek look at trends on Trends

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					We have been selected as finalists in the Oppies 2021!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
	
		 
	
		We are thrilled to reveal that we have been selected as a MRS Operations Awards finalist in the category of Best Covid Response – Data Collection.
	
		 
	
		The awards (fondly known as the 'Oppies'), have taken place every year since 2014 and seek to recognise the operations professionals who are often the 'unsung heroes' of the industry, and who do such vital work in the sector. 
	
		 
	
		Following a year of challenges due to Covid-19, the MRS announced the finalists, saying: 
	
		 
	
		"After a year of unprecedented challenges for research operations, the judges were more impressed than ever with the creativity, care and commitment to delivery displayed in the entries for 2021."
	
		 
	
		Due to a rise in Covid-19 infections the winners will be announced via an online broadcast, which will take place in September.
	
		 
	
		Anthea Thomspon, our Operations Manager in Field Services, said of the news:
	
		 
	
		"We are delighted to have been shortlisted for this award. It means a lot, particularly after such a difficult and uncertain 18 months. During the pandemic our face-to-face operations team had to adapt quickly to different ways of working; coming up with suggestions and working with our clients to adapt methodologies which both maintained data quality and safety for participants. We are all looking forward to the virtual event on the 23rd September!"
	
		 
	
		Huge congrats to all of our DJS team and good luck for the result! 
	
		 
	
		 


	Get more DJS News: 

	Our BIG birthday news: we're now an employee-owned company!

	 

	We are expanding our remote-working network!

	 

	A graduate two-month work experience at DJS...

				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-have-been-selected-as-finalists-in-the-Oppies-2021
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				<title>
					Our BIG birthday news: we're now an employee-owned company!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-BIG-birthday-news-were-now-an-employee-owned-company
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-BIG-birthday-news-were-now-an-employee-owned-company
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				<title>
					Join our growing team! Exciting new job opportunities at DJS Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Join-our-growing-team-Exciting-new-job-opportunities-at-DJS-Research
				</link>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Join-our-growing-team-Exciting-new-job-opportunities-at-DJS-Research
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				<title>
					We are expanding our remote-working network!
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				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-expanding-our-remote-working-network
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-expanding-our-remote-working-network
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				<title>
					A graduate two-month work experience at DJS...
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/A-graduate-two-month-work-experience-at-DJS
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/A-graduate-two-month-work-experience-at-DJS
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				<title>
					We are proud to continue our support of the Market Research Benevolent Association
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		Our company is a proud member of the Market Research Benevolent Association (MRBA) – the market research industry's independent, registered charity, and we are thrilled to be in a position to continue supporting the charity as a sponsor in 2021. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-proud-to-continue-our-support-of-the-Market-Research-Benevolent-Association
				</link>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-proud-to-continue-our-support-of-the-Market-Research-Benevolent-Association
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				<title>
					40 more years of loyalty from DJS staff!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/40-more-years-of-loyalty-from-DJS-staff
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/40-more-years-of-loyalty-from-DJS-staff
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				<title>
					2205 miles covered for our Get up and Go Challenge 2021!
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				<description>
					
	
		
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/2205-miles-covered-for-our-Get-up-and-Go-Challenge-2021
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				<title>
					We have been selected for the Network Rail Insight Framework!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		Following a multi-stage tendering process, we are delighted to announce that DJS Research has been awarded a contract to provide Network Rail with market research services. 
	
		 
	
		We will undertake market research for Network Rail in two lots: Quantitative and Qualitative Primary Market Research and Commercial Market Intelligence, including a range of services:
	
		 
	
		bull; B2C/B2B/CX 
	
		bull; Employee engagement 
	
		bull; Comms development  evaluation 
	
		bull; Brand reputation 
	
		bull; Stakeholder engagement including journalists and politicians
	
		bull; Mystery shopping 
	
		bull; Pedestrian counting 
	
		bull; Behaviour change 
	
		bull; Segmentation 
	
		bull; Public health and safety 
	
		 
	
		Network Rail owns, operates and develops Britain's railway infrastructure, managing 20 of the UK's largest stations and responsible for 20,000 miles of track. It has a vision to put its passengers and freight users first and be a company that people are proud to work for. Now working within a new structure, it is committed to being more responsive to train operators, passengers and freight users.
	
		 
	
		Elliot Simmonds, Research Director at DJS Research, said of the successful framework bid:
	
		 
	
		"Being one of only a handful of agencies appointed to Network Rail's insight framework for the coming years is a testament to our continued desire to work with clients who are leading the way in innovation and meeting the challenges of the future head on. Network Rail's vision of putting passengers first is something that chimed immediately with us at DJS, and it is a vision we are looking forward to working with them towards. We're very proud to be on this journey with them."
	
		 
	
		This is the most recent in a number of framework successes including WRAP and Cadent. 
	
		 


	Get more DJS News: 

	2021 off to a great start as we welcome eight new staff!

	 

	40 more decades of loyalty from DJS staff!

	 

	Reframing project management – a person centred approach.

				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-have-been-selected-for-the-Network-Rail-Insight-Framework
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-have-been-selected-for-the-Network-Rail-Insight-Framework
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				<title>
					2021 off to a great start as we welcome eight new staff!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/2021-off-to-a-great-start-as-we-welcome-eight-new-staff
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/2021-off-to-a-great-start-as-we-welcome-eight-new-staff
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				<title>
					Reframing project management – a person centred approach.
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
	
		But what do you actually do?
	
		At this point in a normal year, you'd find me steeling myself for a season of awkward gatherings. Smiling patiently while distant and aged relatives perform their annual interrogation:
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Reframing-project-management-a-person-centred-approach
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Reframing-project-management-a-person-centred-approach
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				<title>
					Review of the year 2020: it's been a very different year!
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Review-of-the-year-2020-its-been-a-very-different-year
				</link>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Review-of-the-year-2020-its-been-a-very-different-year
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				<title>
					DJS Research - Review of the Year 2019
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Review-of-the-Year-2019
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Review-of-the-Year-2019
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				<title>
					Fundraising in the age of Covid-19: Our 25 on the 25th Challenge for the Thomas Theyer Foundation
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Fundraising-in-the-age-of-Covid-19-Our-25-on-the-25th-Challenge-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
				</link>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Fundraising-in-the-age-of-Covid-19-Our-25-on-the-25th-Challenge-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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				<title>
					Statistical Analysis
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Statistical analysis is the process a researcher goes through to uncover patterns and trends within data. The researcher may also choose to use a computer programme to assist in sorting through the data, so a more complex analysis can be performed. Statistical analysis is used as it is a quantitative way to help eliminate bias from a research study. The patterns that statistical analysis uncover can help predict future trends in an industry to help a company stay ahead of the competition. When conducting statistical analysis, many researchers will put the data into graphs or tables as it makes the patterns easier to view. When done correctly, they will show how each data point correlates with the other data points.

  

 Statistical analysis is used in all industries to view progression and to predict future trends. One of the most important is in the health industry and its use of medication. When new medicines are first introduced, statistical analysis is used in order to find out the effect it has on the body and whether the medicine is reacting in the way it is supposed to. For example, a new drug is used to cure a disease, however many people who have taken the medicine experience headaches and breathing difficulties. When statistical analysis is performed, it may be found that all the people with these side effects have asthma, and the medicine is reacting with it.
				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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				<title>
					Standard Deviation
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Standard deviation is used in analysing statistics and is a measure of the variation from the data set to the mean – the bigger the variation, the higher the standard deviation. When conducting a research study, a low variation is ideal because it indicates a low range in the data set and that all the points of data are similar. A higher deviation suggests a less reliable research study because the data points are more spread out. 

  

 When presenting research findings after the study is completed, researchers will often use the mean to show the results as it is easier to understand. However, the mean can be misleading as a whole set of data is represented as a single figure. When a set of data is presented as a mean or average, standard deviation should also be used to add more information. For example, if eight friends shared a pizza with eight slices, the mean number of slices each person gets will be one. However, the standard deviation is one slice, meaning someone didn't get a slice and someone else got two. The use of standard deviation changes the statistic, even though it is actually the same. Presenting the standard deviation, alongside the mean, will give more information and be just as simple to understand.
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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				<title>
					Statistical Significance
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Statistical significance is used by market researchers to ensure their findings have not occurred by chance, and are reliable. For a research finding to be statistically significant, the researcher must show it is at least 95% probable, allowing for an error margin of 5%; this means that if the study was repeated 100 times, a minimum of 95 test results would be the same. In market research, it is highly unlikely that a research study will include all of a target population or be without bias, which makes statistical significance important in demonstrating the reliability of the findings.

  

 To calculate the statistical significance of a finding, the researcher will conduct either a T-test or a Z-test. A T-test assesses whether the findings were a result of chance by checking if two independent groups have the same mean. A Z-test checks the significance of a finding by checking if two independent groups have an equal population proportion. If the tests prove that the mean or proportion are equal, the findings will not be statistically significant.

  

 An important factor that could prevent a finding from being statistically significant is sampling error. Sampling error is when the participants selected for a research study are not representative of the whole target population. In this case, the results will not reflect the whole population correctly, meaning there is no statistical significance.
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					Recruitment Screener
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				<description>
					
 A recruitment screener is a series of qualifying questions used by market researchers to identify if the selection of participants accurately reflects the target population. They are also used to assess if a candidate fits the criteria for a particular research study. While most of the questions will be closed questions to illicit specific answers from the participant, the recruitment screener should also include some open questions as to help better understand the candidate.

  

 To save time, screeners will be conducted over the phone or online; therefore, if the participant isn't selected, they haven't had to travel anywhere. Most recruitment screeners will find out the occupation of the participant as they could work for the company being researched or for a market research company themselves, meaning their answers may be biased. Furthermore, eliciting the participant's age, along with where they work and live are often key points when conducting market research. Setting parameters for the study will help eliminate possible candidates to ensure the selection of participants reflects the target population accurately. Once the candidates have all been given the recruitment screener, the market researchers will select the participants who they think will make up the most accurate representation of the target population, or who they think will be most insightful. 

  

 Recruitment screeners are useful in making a research study more valid and tailored better for the individual study. 
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					Multi-Modal Research
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				<description>
					
 Multi-modal research is a type of market research where the respondent is asked to comment on a product using the five senses – smell, sight, sound, taste and touch. This methodology is most used in industries such as food and drink or music, as the business is oriented toward a specific sense. 

  

 Although these industries can be solely associated with one sense, a collection of the other senses can be used to assess and form an opinion about the product. For example, in the food industry, a meal would have to taste good but also look and smell appetising with a texture the customer likes. Multi-modal research would allow the participant to express their feelings for the brand using all the senses available to them.

  

 Multi-modal research can also be used to describe research where different methodologies are used; such as focus groups or an online community. It can be an effective way at saving time and money as you can do a lot of the research and get to know the participants online within an online community. An in-depth observation can then be made during a focus group when the researcher knows a little bit about the participants. 

  

 Performing online market research prior to the actual study could also be insightful for the researcher as to who they choose to observe in a real-life setting. For example, if the participants were asked to give their views on a beef burger, a participant who knows a lot about fast food would likely give a more insightful opinion.
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					Mann-Whitney U Test
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				<description>
					
 The Mann-Whitney U test is a nonparametric version of the T-test, used to assess a null hypothesis; stating that all outcomes have an equal chance of being greater or lower than the other. The first idea of such a test was in 1914, however it wasn't fully completed at this time. In 1945, Frank Wilcoxon proposed a more in-depth view however, it was still missing some key points. A few years after in 1947, Henry Mann and his student Donald Whitney conducted a full analysis and created what is now known as the Mann-Whitney U test.

  

 A common way to conduct a Mann-Whitney U test is to first decide on a null and alternative hypothesis; for example, 'There will be no difference between the speed of a dog and the speed of a cat', 'There will be a difference between the speed of a dog and the speed of a cat'. To test these hypotheses, a test using six cats and six dogs will take place, where each animal will race the same distance on the same track. The times of all 12 animals are recorded and each animal will be given a score based off how many of the other animal they beat. The results could be in this order: C, C, D, C, D, D, D, C, D, D, C, C with 'C' being cat and 'D' being dog. The cats' scores were: 6, 6, 5, 2, 0, 0; with the dogs' scores being 4, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2. The next stage is to add up all the scores for each animal (cat – 6+6+5+2+0+0=19) (dog – 4+3+3+3+2+2=17). This study shows that, although not much, there is a difference between the speed of a dog and the speed of a cat.
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					Choice Modelling Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Choice modelling is used in market research to create a scenario where consumers purchase products, in order to observe their decisions. When purchasing products, individuals will unconsciously select certain brands over others without knowing the full reason why; choice modelling aims to uncover these reasons. Often, things such as: packaging, media advertisement and promotional offers will affect which brand the customer buys. Using this information, companies can vary their marketing to best suite their target market and stay ahead of their competition.

  

 Understanding customer opinion of products or services is essential to any business, and sometimes, just performing the study is enough to get new customers. Performing choice modelling market research can show some consumers that the company cares about their opinions. Furthermore, quickly acting on the findings from the study can show just how much the brand values its customers.

  

 Choice modelling market research can also provide relevant information regarding data such as age and gender. On some research studies, the respondent will be asked to state either their age, gender or both. Based on this data, patterns may appear regarding what different generations look for when purchasing specific products. It may also be revealed that the company's originally planned target market might be wrong, and it's found that more people from outside the target market are interested in the product.
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					Applied Market Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Applied market research is a specific type of market research, used to find answers to questions that have a direct impact on practical scenarios. For example, applied research would be used in the medical industry to uncover the healing properties of certain foods or medicines and to ascertain if it could be used practically. Unlike many other studies, an applied research study will often create the solutions for the problem, making it effective when used properly and in the correct situation.

  

 Alongside applied, there are many other types of market research, one of the more common ones being basic research. Basic research is used to increase the understanding individuals have on the topic, instead of finding solutions for it. For example, basic research would study the side effects of a specific medicine or food, instead of whether it could be used to treat people. Applied research is often used in a follow up study to a basic research study, because the increased knowledge that basic research uncovers can illicit problems that applied research could be able to solve.

  

 Applied research uses quantitative data and scientific evidence to find solutions for problems; which creates little chance for bias in the study as all the data has previously been checked. Often, the quantitative data used will have been found by a basic study into the same subject.
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					Usability Testing
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				<description>
					
 Usability testing is used in a range of industries and involves allowing a customer to use a product, and then analysing their thoughts and how it performed. The test helps identify issues with a product before being put on sale, but also shows what works well. In market research, it isn't much different; the researcher gives a representative user the product and allows them to test it with some feedback. The feedback provided by the participant can also act as leverage to create a better marketing campaign.

  

 Having a researcher with good observational skills is important when conducting usability testing because they will need to be able to observe the participant closely. Sometimes what the participant does or how they act is different to how the product developers intended; which could lead to misuse of the product and make the product less profitable. In some circumstances, this could create a negative perception about the brand or company behind it.

  

 Often, during usability testing, participants will be asked to solve a problem (or something similar) with the product, then to say aloud what they think they're doing. This allows the researcher to observe differences in how the participant thought the product would work, what they are doing and what they think they are doing. This then allows the researcher to better understand how customers could misuse the product once it has been released.
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					Market Research Moderator
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				<description>
					
 A market research moderator is responsible for ensuring the discussion in a focus group runs smoothly. They are also responsible for introducing new and relevant topics to the discussion to ensure the requirements of the research study are met. During the study, the moderator has to remain neutral as to not alter the opinions of the participants.

  

 Good market research moderators take note of verbal answers as well as being aware of the non-verbal signals the respondents give, meaning they must have good listening and awareness skills. Furthermore, the moderator must be trusted by the researcher, as to ensure the research study is as reliable as possible. Some moderators also find it useful to prepare what they are going to say to the participants, especially when they first meet, in order to allow the participants to have trust in the study.

  

 Often, when performing group-based studies, the participants aren't completely in the know about what the study is actually testing; therefore, they might give answers that bear no relevance, or little relevance to the study. It is then the moderator's job to move the conversation back to the correct topics, without revealing the full purpose of the research study. The moderator could also ask questions that have little impact on the findings as to enclose the full purpose of the study.
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					GANTT Chart for Market Research
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				<description>
					
 A GANTT chart is a horizontal bar chart used to show key dates in a project including the start and finish. In market research, it is used to plan a project effectively, to help reduce stress and to help the project be more time efficient. A well-made GANTT chart will show which tasks can be done in parallel with each other, and which have to follow a specific timeline to complete in order. It can also show which parts of a project are a main priority and which can be delayed a short time.

  

 To make an effective GANTT chart, the first action is to list the objectives and goals of the project so the tasks in the chart are all directed towards the main aim of the study. Next, realistic dates should be set out – not too short to ensure the project is completed, but not too long to make sure it is performed in the most time efficient way. Once the goals and timings have been decided, the tasks must be listed so the team can do their work in parallel to others and separately. Furthermore, the tasks should be assigned to specific people to ensure no confusion about who is doing what. Finally, the project can begin; however, the progress of each task must be monitored and evaluated regularly to make sure the project being completed at the desired pace and finished on time.
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					Consumer Behaviour Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Consumer behaviour market research is a type of research that studies how customers behave and what makes them choose certain products. This data can help the company know how to package and sell their products in order to make new customers and keep existing ones. There are many ways the behaviour of the consumer can be observed, including: face-to-face interviews, email surveys and direct observation. It is also an effective way of knowing what the company's competitors are doing better in the eyes of the consumer.

  

 A big part of consumer behaviour is system 1 and 2 thinking – how we make decisions. System 1 is initial thoughts and is how we make most of our decisions. System 2 is when we make a decision based on more in-depth facts. For example, if a customer is deciding which packet of cereal to buy, they will most likely make their decision on the packaging (system 1), however, they could make their decision based on ingredients or calories (system 2).

  

 A further important factor to understand consumer behaviour is a company's brand equity. Good relations between a company and their customers will create a positive brand equity and increase sales over their competitors. A negative brand equity, commonly instigated by poor products or customer services, will change the consumer behaviour.
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					Statistical Margin of Error
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A statistical margin of error is used to express the amount of random sampling error in a research survey. Researchers will aim for a smaller margin of error as to increase the validity of their study and show they have sampled a good representation of the target population. Every research study will have a statistical margin of error, unless the study tests the whole of a target population.

  

 The margin of error in statistics also relates to the confidence interval of a research study. The confidence interval is an estimate that the whole target population will fall between a certain range of data. They measure the degree of uncertainty in a sample population and will often estimate between 95% and 99% confidence – when a greater number of participants are observed, the percentage of confidence increases, therefore the confidence interval decreases. The statistical margin of error is equal to half of the confidence interval, meaning that when more people are tested, the margin of error decreases, leading to a more valid study.

  

 If a survey is published without a margin of error specified, it could be viewed as incomplete. For example, if a research study stated that 29% of adults have cereal before work with an error margin of 4%, the data should be interpreted to be 25-33% of adults have cereal before work. Without the statistical margin of error, the data changes significantly and wouldn't be an accurate representation of the whole target population.
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					Probability Sampling
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Probability sampling is a sampling method where all the participants, knowingly, have an equal chance at being selected based on probability. When a larger population is involved in a research study, it is not time or cost effective to observe everyone, so only a few are chosen. Probability sampling is used on the assumption that random selection would create an accurate representation of the whole target population.

  

 There are four types of probability sampling: simple random sampling, stratified random sampling, random cluster sampling and systematic sampling. Simple random sampling involves the researcher assigning each participant with a number, then using an automated, random number selector to decide which participants are chosen.

  

 The second type of probability sampling is stratified random sampling. Stratified random sampling involves the researcher putting each participant into smaller sub-groups that represent everyone in the target population. The sub-groups will not noticeably overlap and everyone in each group has an equal chance at being selected.

  

 Another method is random cluster sampling, which involves selecting participants randomly via geographical location. For example, to research people's views about the UK government, the researcher would take samples from various locations around the UK to gain a better oversight of the whole target population.

  

 The final method of probability sampling, systematic sampling, is when the researcher selects every nth person to be observed; for example, every 3rd person. This provides an equal chance of selection for all participants.
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					Computer Aided Self-Interview (CASI)
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A computer aided self-interview is a research method that involves the respondent using a computer to answer a survey without there being an interviewer or respondent asking the questions or taking note of the answers. They are often used when the researcher is trying to ascertain sensitive information about someone as to ensure they are answering in an entirely confidential way. Usually performed at the respondent's home, computer aided self-interviews are easily accessible to anyone as long as they have a computer.

  

 There are two types of computer aided self-interview: audio and video. A video CASI is most commonly used; however, does require the participant to have a good level of eye-sight and to be able to read well. An audio CASI, on the other hand, allows people with limited or no vision to still participate in a research study.

  

 Computer aided self-interviews are often performed using software on a website allowing for, potentially, a worldwide audience and a greater amount of people to be able to access the survey. They are also relatively inexpensive because no researcher will need to be present. However, CASI surveys are targeting just people who own computers, possibly allowing bias into the study. Furthermore, they could also cause confusion for the respondent as a question may be open to interpretation. With no interviewer present, the respondent could answer the question incorrectly and it may be a biased answer.
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					Hypothesis Testing Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Hypothesis testing is used to analyse two statements about a research study to assess which is best supported by the data. A regular hypothesis should be decided upon before the study has begun; however, to test it, a contrasting hypothesis is made as to see which correlates to the data best. This helps validate the research study by looking at multiple conflicting conclusions instead of just one. 

  

 Hypotheses are used in a range of scenarios, from a school Science classroom to a factory in the food industry. Any time there is a question that requires a study or research, there should also be a hypothesis. There are also a few different variations of a hypothesis, the most common being null or alternative hypothesis. A null hypothesis is used when it is not expected that there will be any significant difference between the two variables being studied and is normally the type of hypothesis a researcher would attempt to disprove. An alternative hypothesis is the opposite and states that there is a difference in the variables. Often when performing hypothesis testing, they will be measured against each other. For example, if the hypothesis at the start of the study was a null hypothesis, an alternative will be used after the study to test it.
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					Neuromarketing Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Neuromarketing research is the area that studies neurological responses to stimuli such as advertisements or branding. Performing a neuromarketing study can help the researcher understand the subconscious decision making and thought process of a consumer through the use of science. Like many market research methodologies, it can involve a variety of different methods including traditional interviews and focus groups.

  

 Neuromarketing is important to understand when trying to promote a company or product. Understanding the unconscious thoughts that people experience when faced with differing stimuli is vital to tailor advertisement for a specific target market.

  

 An advantage of neuromarketing research is there are many different ways of conducting it, allowing the researcher to understand a consumer's unconscious thoughts. However, these methods are often costly when compared to other research strategies. Methodologies such as eye-tracking and functional MRI scans require equipment that is costly to rent or to buy, but do give a detailed insight into how a person thinks when faced with a certain stimulus.

  

 For example, performing an eye-tracking test, to find out what draws the attention of a specific demographic, could uncover that the participant first looks at the colour blue but then focusses on the colour red after a few seconds. In this case, the respondent might likely suggest that they only noticed the red section. However, the use of eye-tracking shows the researcher that the participant caught sight of the colour blue first, indicating a disparency between the consumer's conscious and sub-conscious thoughts.
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					Pilot Study Market Research
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				<description>
					
 A pilot study is performed before the main research study has begun and is used to evaluate the key parts of the proposed study before fully committing. They are more commonly used, and are more effective with quantitative studies, because it is difficult to change a quantitative study after it has started. Qualitative studies, on the other hand, are easier to change and adapt after the main project has started.

  

 Performing a pilot study will often save time because it can uncover issues with the research study that were previously unnoticed. For example, if an important question was missing off a questionnaire, the researcher may have to analyse more data than is needed to see which participants are most suited to a particular study. However, with the question added after the pilot study, the number of viable participants may fall. Using this pilot study, the amount of data that needs to be analysed decreases, allowing for a quicker and easier process.

  

 A further use of a pilot study is to check that the client and the market research company work well together. A pilot study will show if they are on the same page or whether they have two contrasting ideas or plans. It can be viewed as a trial period for both the market research company and client.
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					Semiotics in Market Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Semiotics is used in market research to help the researcher understand how and why individuals use their current environment to make decisions. Semiotics is the study of sign-using behaviour, meaning how people decide they will perform an action based on the signals they are given from the situation they're in. People use semiotics every day, for example, deciding what to wear based on how warm it is, or choosing to eat a lollipop because you fancy something sweet.

  

 In market research, semiotics is most useful when trying to understand the reasonings behind certain actions and decisions. Using semiotics, brands can tailor their products better to what the consumer is looking for, both consciously and unconsciously. 

  

 Performing many semiotic tests would be necessary, however, because what one person might view as a positive sign, another might view as negative. Understanding differences culturally and generationally can help researchers understand the differing opinions on the same signals. Often, posts on social media are open to much interpretation because, in text form, the message cannot be viewed with a tone of voice assigned to it, a sign that many people use when identifying sarcasm or when someone is serious.

  

 Other instances, such as slogans or logos, influence people's unconscious decisions differently because of their colour or design. The first reaction a customer has to a company is the most important one, so the brand must ensure a good message is portrayed through the slogan and logo.
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					Multiple Regression Analysis
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Multiple regression analysis is one of the most common types of linear regression analysis – linking dependent and independent variables to find trends. In contrast to simple linear regression, multiple linear regression is the term used when two or more independent variables are used to influence the dependent variable. Multiple linear regression analysis is viewed as more reliable and accurate than simple linear regression because of its ability to use two or more independent variables. Linear regression, as a whole, is used to view future trends and to see how much the dependent variables would change in certain scenarios (when the independent variables are changed).

  

 Companies will use multiple linear regression to enable them to predict future trends and to understand what causes changes to occur. For example, a university would like to find out why certain students perform better in exams than others. The independent variables in this study would be: number of lectures attended, amount of revision, and A-level grades, with the dependent variable being the exam mark. The research study found that students who attended the most lectures and did the most revision ended up with higher marks than the students who did less revision and went to less lectures. However, the researcher found no correlation between previous A-level results and the outcome of the exam. This research would allow the university to focus more on lectures and revision, than on previous test results.
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					Survey finds that the pandemic has driven IoT adoption in oil and gas sector
				</title>
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 Survey finds that the pandemic has driven IoT adoption in oil and gas sector: A survey of respondents from industries including oil and gas, electrical utilities, mining and transport has found that the adoption of IoT has been accelerated in the last 12 months in response to Covid-19.
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					Order books hit record high, whilst manufacturers struggle to meet high demand due to supply chain challenges, finds survey
				</title>
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 Order books hit record high, whilst manufacturers struggle to meet high demand due to supply chain challenges: As order books have grown to their strongest level since 1977 when records began, output growth has continued to slow according to the latest industrial trends survey by the CBI, as manufacturers struggle to meet high demand amid supply chain back-ups.
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					Electronics manufacturers are struggling to hire enough workers, with 80% expecting the situation to continue, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Electronics manufacturers are struggling to hire enough workers, with 80% expecting the situation to continue: A survey of electronics manufacturers has revealed insight into the current state of the sector, with 80% of respondents saying the challenge of finding qualified workers is not likely to ease. 

  

 In response to this, nearly half those polled said they have taken to upskilling their workforce (46%) as well as increasing wages (44%) in a bid to attract and keep workers. 

  

 The survey by IPC, which polled hundreds of electronics manufacturers around the globe, also found that a global shortage of products and components is causing problems with production delays, increased materials costs and optimism within the industry. 

  

 Nearly nine out of 10 respondents (88%) reported experiencing increased lead times, with nearly a third (31%) seeing delays to products of eight weeks or more.  Asked when they expect the shortages to end, over half (58%) believe it will be the second half of 2022 at the earliest,  according to the research.

  

 Six in 10 companies polled also reported that backlogs are increasing as global inventories are declining, with a quarter believing they will continue to deplete. Just under half expect inventories to stay flat.

  

 The research also found that 90% of those polled said that they have paid higher prices to their supppliers due to shortages.

  

 Shawn DuBravac, IPC chief economist and lead researcher on the study, said: "Supply shortages and other dislocations are impacting the global electronics supply chain and every downstream industry these manufacturers serve. Strong demand is helping industry sales, but shortages are delaying shipments and increasing backlogs. Manufacturers are facing higher prices as they compete for limited supply. This is a global phenomenon that is going to take well into next year to resolve."
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Electronics-manufacturers-are-struggling-to-hire-enough-workers-with-80percent-expecting-the-situation-to-continue-finds-survey-04941
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Electronics-manufacturers-are-struggling-to-hire-enough-workers-with-80percent-expecting-the-situation-to-continue-finds-survey-04941
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					41% of UK workers would not tell employer about health issue, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 41% of UK workers would not tell employer about health issue: A survey or workers and employers has found that more than two-fifths (41%) of employees would not feel comfortable telling their employer about a health issue they were experiencing.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/41percent-of-UK-workers-would-not-tell-employer-about-health-issue-reveals-survey-04936
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/41percent-of-UK-workers-would-not-tell-employer-about-health-issue-reveals-survey-04936
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Just 9% of construction professionals always incorporate project data into decision making, finds poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Just 9% of construction professionals always incorporate project data into decision making: A survey of construction professionals innn Europe has revealed that fewer than one in 10 always use project data when making business decisions, while 64% incorporate project data some of the time, rarely or never.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Just-9percent-of-construction-professionals-always-incorporate-project-data-into-decision-making-finds-poll-04940
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Just-9percent-of-construction-professionals-always-incorporate-project-data-into-decision-making-finds-poll-04940
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Three in 10 construction professionals say that half of their data was 'bad' in 2020, according to survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Three in 10 construction professionals say that half of their data was 'bad' in 2020: A survey of construction professionals has  found that 30% reported that more than half of their data in 2020 was incomplete, inaccurate or inconsistent, resulting in them being unable to use it for reliable insights. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Three-in-10-construction-professionals-say-that-half-of-their-data-was-bad-in-2020-according-to-survey-04939
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Three-in-10-construction-professionals-say-that-half-of-their-data-was-bad-in-2020-according-to-survey-04939
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Most popular solution to anticipated fuel tax loss is a new EV tax, according to survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Most popular solution to anticipated fuel tax loss is a new EV tax: A survey has revealed that the most popular solution to the Treasury's anticipated £40 billion fuel tax loss due to the growing EV market is a new Electric Vehicle tax, supported by 38% of the respondents polled.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Most-popular-solution-to-anticipated-fuel-tax-loss-is-a-new-EV-tax-according-to-survey-04937
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Most-popular-solution-to-anticipated-fuel-tax-loss-is-a-new-EV-tax-according-to-survey-04937
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Over 50% of employed 18-25-year-olds are considering handing in their notice, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Over 50% of employed 18-25-year-olds are considering handing in their notice: A survey of workers in 31 countries, has revealed that over half the 18-to 25-year-olds polled are considering quitting their job, with 38% of employees in the UK and Ireland planning on handing in their notice within the next year.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Over-50percent-of-employed-18-25-year-olds-are-considering-handing-in-their-notice-reveals-survey-04890
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Over-50percent-of-employed-18-25-year-olds-are-considering-handing-in-their-notice-reveals-survey-04890
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Research reveals that during pandemic, museum engagement amongst disabled people has improved
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Research reveals that during pandemic, museum engagement amongst disabled people has improved: A study has revealed some positive news in terms of engagement relating to the museums sector, uncovering that the global Covid-19 pandemic has improved engagement for disabled people.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Research-reveals-that-during-pandemic-museum-engagement-amongst-disabled-people-has-improved-04916
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Research-reveals-that-during-pandemic-museum-engagement-amongst-disabled-people-has-improved-04916
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Just two in five charity offices plan to reopen after the final lockdown restrictions are lifted, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Just two in five charity offices planned to reopen after the final lockdown: A survey of charity leaders undertaken before Covid restrictions were lifted in the UK after its third lockdown has revealed that just 39% planned to fully reopen after restrictions were eased, with nearly a third (30%) saying they won't reopen their offices at all.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Just-two-in-five-charity-offices-plan-to-reopen-after-the-final-lockdown-restrictions-are-lifted-reveals-survey-04904
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Just-two-in-five-charity-offices-plan-to-reopen-after-the-final-lockdown-restrictions-are-lifted-reveals-survey-04904
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					One in four teachers grading exams report feeling pressured by parents to change GCSE/A-level results, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 One in four teachers grading exams report feeling pressured by parents to change GCSE/A-level Results: A survey of teachers has found that a quarter have felt under pressure to alter GCSE or A-level grades due to parents.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/One-in-four-teachers-grading-exams-report-feeling-pressured-by-parents-to-change-GCSEA-level-results-reveals-survey-04908
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/One-in-four-teachers-grading-exams-report-feeling-pressured-by-parents-to-change-GCSEA-level-results-reveals-survey-04908
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					High levels of racism found in civil engineering industry, according to ICE survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey into racism within the civil engineering industry published by ICE: A survey looking at racism within the civil engineering industry has revealed the extent of the issue, prompting the Institute of Civil Engineers to act.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/High-levels-of-racism-found-in-civil-engineering-industry-according-to-ICE-survey-04935
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/High-levels-of-racism-found-in-civil-engineering-industry-according-to-ICE-survey-04935
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Scottish Engineering survey reveals challenges for the sector
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Scottish Engineering survey reveals challenges for the sector: A survey by Scottish Engineering has revealed insight into the challenges facing the sector despite the ending of lockdown measures, with Brexit cited as a factor causing skills shortages.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Scottish-Engineering-survey-reveals-challenges-for-the-sector-04934
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Scottish-Engineering-survey-reveals-challenges-for-the-sector-04934
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Two thirds of UK engineering design firms believe there is a problem in recruiting and retaining staff, finds poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Two thirds of UK engineering design firms believe there is a problem in recruiting and retaining staff: A survey of engineering design firms in the UK has found that 68% believe there is an issue in the sector when it comes to recruiting and/or retaining staff.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Two-thirds-of-UK-engineering-design-firms-believe-there-is-a-problem-in-recruiting-and-retaining-staff-finds-poll-04933
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Two-thirds-of-UK-engineering-design-firms-believe-there-is-a-problem-in-recruiting-and-retaining-staff-finds-poll-04933
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Four in 10 Brits are concerned about the amount of plastic packaging in their food and drink items, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Four in 10 Brits are concerned about the amount of plastic packaging in their food and drink items: A survey has revealed that four in 10 UK shoppers have concerns regarding the level of plastic surrounding their food and drink items. 

  

 Furthermore, 51% of 55-64-year-olds have expressed their concern about the impact that plastic is having on the environment and themselves; making the age group the most outspoken about plastic pollution.

  

 The study, by Harris Interactive, polled 1,000 UK shoppers and highlighted the biggest issues in reducing the number of single-use plastics. A quarter stated they don't believe the alternatives are as good, with a further 46% saying they don't believe there are enough alternatives to rival plastic packaging. The lack of alternative packaging was the third biggest issue; behind ocean (65%) and land (54%) pollution.

  

 Just under three-quarters of the participants polled said brands and manufacturers have the most responsibility to help the plastic problem; with 54% saying that consumers have more responsibility than the government (52%).

  

 When asked about which supermarkets have made the most progress in the past five years, nearly three in 10 said 'none of them', while 15% said Tesco. In comparison, just 3% believe Iceland has reduced its single-use plastics well, with only 4% believing Lidl has made significant progress.

  

 The survey highlighted that nearly a quarter of participants are willing to attempt cutting out single use plastics completely, with 23% saying they have tried a plastic-free challenge. 18-34-year-olds were most likely to take on the challenge, with two-thirds, of those who took the challenge, saying they managed to complete it. Challenges ranged from a plastic-free month, to a single shop with the aim of  reducing the number of single-use plastic items bought.

  

 Nearly three in 10 (29%) shoppers stated they felt 'quite concerned' about the number of single-use plastics used to package their food and drink, with a further 22% saying they felt a 'little concerned'. On the other hand, 7% answered 'it doesn't matter', with 3% unable to decide.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Four-in-10-Brits-are-concerned-about-the-amount-of-plastic-packaging-in-their-food-and-drink-items-reveals-survey-04930
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Four-in-10-Brits-are-concerned-about-the-amount-of-plastic-packaging-in-their-food-and-drink-items-reveals-survey-04930
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Mental health of employees is top challenge for PR industry over coming 12 months, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Mental health of employees is top challenge for PR industry over coming 12 months: A survey of people working in the PR industry has found that when asked about the main challenges facing the industry over the next 12 months, 'mental health problems among practitioners' was cited by 51% of respondents, making it the top concern.  This was followed by fears about 'recession and job losses' (48%), the 'dominance of digital channels' (38%) and 'fake news/disinformation' (38%).
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Mental-health-of-employees-is-top-challenge-for-PR-industry-over-coming-12-months-according-to-poll-04919
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Mental-health-of-employees-is-top-challenge-for-PR-industry-over-coming-12-months-according-to-poll-04919
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					More than a third of Brits trust the news most of the time, finds poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 More than a third of Brits trust the news most of the time: A survey has revealed insight into people's attitudes and trust in news sources, with trust growing by 8 percentage points in the UK since the pandemic began.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/More-than-a-third-of-Brits-trust-the-news-most-of-the-time-finds-poll-04898
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/More-than-a-third-of-Brits-trust-the-news-most-of-the-time-finds-poll-04898
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					A third of people more likely to enter a shop or restaurant when Covid restrictions are lifted if mask wearing is still in place, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A third of people more likely to enter a shop or resturant when Covid restrictions are lifted if mask wearing is still in place:A survey has revealed insight into how people are feeling about shopping and eating out post Covid, with a third of people saying they will be more likely to enter a shop or restaurant if mask wearing is still in place.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-people-more-likely-to-enter-a-shop-or-restaurant-when-Covid-restrictions-are-lifted-if-mask-wearing-is-still-in-place-finds-survey-04896
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-people-more-likely-to-enter-a-shop-or-restaurant-when-Covid-restrictions-are-lifted-if-mask-wearing-is-still-in-place-finds-survey-04896
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Survey reveals majority of consumers plan to continue shopping online
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey reveals majority of consumers plan to continue shopping online: A survey has found that despite many retailers reopening their physical stores around the globe after periods of closure due to Covid-19, the majority of consumers (85.9%) said they plan to continue shopping online the same (59.3%), or even more (26.6%). Just 14.1% said they will shop less online.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-majority-of-consumers-plan-to-continue-shopping-online-04915
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-majority-of-consumers-plan-to-continue-shopping-online-04915
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Over a third of English councils support plans that could increase carbon emissions, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Over a third of English councils support plans that could increase carbon emissions: A recent survey by the BBC has revealed that around a third of English councils (33%) have supported plans that could potentially increase carbon emissions; including upgrading airports, building new roads and constructing underground tunnels.

  

 Despite many councils advocating plans that could increase the amount of carbon in the atmosphere, nearly nine in 10 have declared a 'climate emergency'. Many of the most rural counties, however, believe there is there is no such a climate emergency; which may help to explain a more relaxed approach by certain councils.

  

 Many people believe the government's plans to cut all greenhouse gases to almost zero, does not align with local council's plans to develop. When asked why the progression to net-zero emissions has been slow, two thirds of English councils stated the pandemic was a main reason. Furthermore, the Isle of Wight council has expressed their concern that the pandemic might delay their aim of being net-zero in 2030 by 10 years.

  

 Another reason given for the slow progress towards net-zero emissions is the under-funding from the government. The National Audit Office has recently found that the government set aside £1.2billion to be put towards tackling the climate change issue; however, the competitive nature of these grants makes long term planning more difficult.

  

 Helen Hayden, councillor for infrastructure and climate for Leeds city council, said: "It would seem like an inconsistency. So, we do have to keep it in context and not let it distract us from doing all those things that will actually tackle the bigger issues that are in our city."
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Over-a-third-of-English-councils-support-plans-that-could-increase-carbon-emissions-reveals-survey-04932
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Over-a-third-of-English-councils-support-plans-that-could-increase-carbon-emissions-reveals-survey-04932
				</guid>
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	</rss>