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				<title>
					Contenders Ready! Reflecting on the success of the Gladiators re-boot amongst family audiences
				</title>
				<description>
					
	

	

	

	 

	By Helen Menzies, Research Director

	 

	Have you been watching the re-boot of Gladiators on the BBC?  We certainly have in my house and according to the data we are not alone. Gladiators has been a huge hit for the BBC, in fact it has been the biggest entertainment launch for a new series in seven years with 28 day figures showing that 9.8m viewers watched the first episode, with the series averaging 8.3 million viewers in the run up to the final. Unsurprisingly, a second series has already been commissioned.

	 

	As a Millennial parent, I could certainly feel the power of the Gladiators.  I was 8 years old when it was first broadcast in 1992 and I was so excited when I heard it was returning as it meant I could share it with my 6 year old son.  The re-boot has been timed perfectly to tap into a desire for nostalgic co-viewing, where parents can re-live their youth enjoying movies and shows from the 90s, along with their children.  With wars around the world, the cost of living and climate crises, it is no wonder that increasingly many people want to escape into the welcoming, safe arms of TV entertainment.

	 

	However, family co-viewing has declined significantly since the 90s. When Gladiators was first broadcast there was much less choice on TV, with only 4 main free-to-air channels plus Sky if you were lucky.  According to Barb (the industry's standard for understanding what people watch) there were 17 reported channels in 1992. That compares to a whopping 279 reported channels in 2023, not to mention the myriad of streaming services such as Disney Plus and Netflix that many families now have access to.

	 

	With so much choice and often multiple screens (in multiple rooms), families are less likely than ever to sit down and watch the same thing at the same time. In some recent qualitative research we ran with families, one of the Dads in our study said, "I guarantee you right now downstairs at the moment my wife is in the front room watching the television, my youngest daughter will be sat next to her on her iPad watching YouTube and my elder daughter will be in the other room watching something on Netflix or Disney+." Gladiators has bucked this trend and has become appointment to view television for many families on a Saturday night.

	 

	A great deal of the success of the re-boot is down to the fact that so much of the original format has been left un-changed. Sitting down to watch it as adults we were exclaiming with glee as old favourites such as Duel and Gauntlet came on, not to mention the Travelator! It brought back such happy memories and parents' excitement for the show rubs off on their kids. With family-friendly action, 'easy to hate' characters such as Viper, and easily repeatable catchphrases, the show ticks so many boxes.

	 

	Gladiators, Ready!

	The grand final aired at the end of March and the foam fingers have now been packed away until Series 2. In the fight for Saturday night ratings, it will be interesting to see what, if anything, can fill the Gladiator sized hole in the schedule until then.

	 

	If you want to find out what children, young people and their families are thinking, contact our kids and youth specialist Research Director, Helen Menzies.

	Get more DJS News: 

	Taking on the Edale Skyline Challenge!

	 

	Embracing Slow Travel: reducing our carbon footprint one journey at a time

	 

	Celebrating 11 partners moving on up!

				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Contenders-Ready-Reflecting-on-the-success-of-the-Gladiators-re-boot-amongst-family-audiences
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				<title>
					Challenging ourselves to 'Get up and Go' this January
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				<description>
					
	
		
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Challenging-ourselves-to-Get-up-and-Go-this-January
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Challenging-ourselves-to-Get-up-and-Go-this-January
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				<title>
					Taking on the Edale Skyline Challenge!
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Taking-on-the-Edale-Skyline-Challenge
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Taking-on-the-Edale-Skyline-Challenge
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				<title>
					Embracing Slow Travel: reducing our carbon footprint one journey at a time
				</title>
				<description>
					
	

	

	

	 

	By Gill Redfern, Research Director 

	 

	
		Like many, I try to do my bit when it comes to reducing my household's carbon footprint; as a household we recycle what we can, try to buy local and in season where possible, we are eating less meat/more plant based foods these days, we take steps to minimise our food waste, we try to avoid using single use plastics and thrift our children's clothes when they grow out of them. However, when it comes to a family summer holiday, I have to confess my default is to start by looking at flight options to warmer climes.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Embracing-Slow-Travel-reducing-our-carbon-footprint-one-journey-at-a-time
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Embracing-Slow-Travel-reducing-our-carbon-footprint-one-journey-at-a-time
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					Rolling out the wheel of engagement!
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Rolling-out-the-wheel-of-engagement
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Rolling-out-the-wheel-of-engagement
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					Feeling part of a bigger movement - by Aoife Lynch
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Feeling-part-of-a-bigger-movement-by-Aoife-Lynch
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					Harnessing the power of the EOA Annual Conference 2023
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Harnessing-the-power-of-the-EOA-Annual-Conference-2023
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					Celebrating 11 partners moving on up!
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				<description>
					
	
		
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Celebrating-11-partners-moving-on-up
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Celebrating-11-partners-moving-on-up
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					Our healthcare focus – the prognosis looks good!
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-healthcare-focus-the-prognosis-looks-good
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-healthcare-focus-the-prognosis-looks-good
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					CATI quality compliance: ensuring call volumes of the highest quality for every project
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				<description>
					
	
		By Kerry Boother, CATI Training and Quality Executive
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		In our CATI department we carry out 1,000s of telephone interviews annually, across the UK and around the world. Ensuring that all calls made are of the highest quality is of paramount importance, and on every single project our quality control team work alongside our interviewers to ensure our rigorous standards are achieved. Our interviewers represent not only DJS Research, they are also representing our clients. We want to make sure they have what it takes to obtain the correct information, in the most appropriate way, to meet the specific needs of each client on every project; placing quality at the centre of everything we do, and at the heart of the CATI team, ensures we succeed in this mission. 
	
		 
	
		Our quality results for 2023 really speak for themselves and demonstrate not only the hard work of our amazing CATI interviewers but our commitment to continually evolving and enhancing the skills of this incredible team. So let's take a look... 
	
		 
	
		  
	
		 
	
		How do we deliver and maintain brilliant quality scores throughout the year? 
	
		 
	
		All our interviewers are listened to on every project that they work upon at least twice, and our target in the quality compliance team is to ensure we listen to at least 10% of all calls made on each project. With this robust benchmark in place, it often means we end up listening to far more than just two calls per interviewer, per project! However, each touchpoint only serves to enhance the quality of our outputs. 
	
		 
	
		All calls that are monitored are rated using our DJS research scoring system which sets clear targets for all interviewers to achieve. Just like research methodologies, our scoring system has evolved over time to ensure it remains current and relevant for the work we do. Our Operations Manager Michelle Flanagan conducted a recent review, and made some minor updates and adjustments, optimising it for the year ahead. 
	
		 
	
		Our scoring system is built on five sections which cover every aspect of the call from interviewer tone and conduct to best practice and, most crucially, mandatory regulatory requirements. The first four sections of the system make up 75% of the final score. The fifth section is the most important and demands the most stringent compliance; failure to adhere to any part of the final section would deduct 25% from an interviewer's overall result. 
	
		 
	
		 
	
		Giving constructive feedback and celebrating performance
	
		 
	
		After scoring, feedback is provided to each interviewer via email, Skype or Teams as appropriate. We use a number of different routes to help shift the dial on lower scores as well as maintaining high scores, ensuring they are valued and positioned as something to really strive for:
	
		 
	
		
			One to one feedback sessions - the purpose of these constructive meetings, held on Teams, is to go over where an interviewer needs to improve and conduct role play activities as interviewer and respondent. Practising interview techniques is hugely important as is going over how to implement them. Working through scenarios and playing out the role together helps equip our interviewers with the right tools as well as building confidence which is crucial to successful call handling.
		
			Working closely with Team Leaders – alongside our work in the quality compliance team, CATI Team Leaders continually live listen to pick up errors and areas for improvement. We work closely with team leaders, as by listening to the first few completes on a new job we can identify potential problems quickly and put solutions in place to address them immediately.
		
			Quality meetings with new starters – we schedule these sessions after an interviewer's first week with us and run through quality from start to finish, ensuring they understand the high standard that is expected at DJS Research from the outset. This is also a useful opportunity to identify training gaps and answer any questions they might have.
		
			Rewarding and acknowledging - appreciation and acknowledgement goes a long way and we use DJS thank you cards to recognise the hard work of team members and celebrate not just high scores, but great improvements made.
	
	
		 
	
		Scoring in real time – the DJS 'Quality Dashboard'
	
		 
	
		All interviewers have access to their own 'Quality Dashboard' via the CATI Hub which is linked directly to our quality score sheet. Every time a call is scored, the interviewer's dashboard is immediately updated, ensuring they have a real time view of their performance across all our metrics. The dashboard has been designed to ensure it is easy to understand and users can see at a glance the areas where they are scoring well through to areas that may need improvement, scores by individual section and total call ratings. It's a fantastic tool which not only provides direct access to performance information, but helps to empower our interviewers so they personally recognise their strengths as well as identify areas for self-improvement.
	
		 
	
		                            
	
		
			 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/CATI-quality-compliance-ensuring-call-volumes-of-the-highest-quality-for-every-project
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					Placing wellbeing at the heart of DJS Research
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				<description>
					
	
		
	
		 
	
		The happiness of our people has always been at the very heart of everything we do as, quite simply, without our amazing people there would be no DJS Research! The importance of workplace wellbeing is something we truly believe in and it's this core belief, and the desire to protect and enhance the welfare of our people which was magnified by the covid pandemic, that led to the creation of our incredible Wellbeing Team in late 2020. 
	
		 
	
		What started out as an idea between two compassionate colleagues, keen to raise awareness of the signs that might suggest a team-mate is struggling, has evolved into a fully formed team of passionate wellbeing champions from all over DJS Research. Becoming employee-owned in 2021 further cemented our commitment to our people - now our partners - and our Wellbeing Team help ensure health and happiness remain a top priority.  
	
		 
	
		Each year the team roll out a wide range of engaging activities designed to have a positive impact which extends far beyond our day jobs. From encouraging partners to get active with 'Wellness Wednesday Walks' and our annual 'Get Up and Go' challenge, to fact sheets providing essential information about core health matters and fun competitions and challenges which enhance connectivity and a shared sense of belonging. Every idea is designed with personal wellbeing in mind. 
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Taking time out to grow together – the DJS sunflower challenge! 
	
		 
	
		One brand new, and blooming marvellous, initiative from last year which captured the hearts – and green fingers - of many was our DJS sunflower challenge. With the proven psychological benefits of gardening firmly in mind, last April, our Wellbeing team sent every partner across our organisation a little packet of seeds with the encouragement to take time-out to plant them and 'grow together'. And boy did our partners rise to the challenge - literally! 
	
		 
	
		
	
		          
	
		DJS sunflowers grew strong and tall all over the country and beyond, with seeds planted as far away as Spain and France! Engagement levels were phenomenal, with partners wanting to share their growing stories, proud of their progress and many getting their families involved in the fun. A bit of healthy competition naturally ensued and, much to everyone's excitement, the tallest flowers exceeded a whopping 8.5ft! 
	
		 
	
		The positive impacts of this little gardening challenge really cannot be underestimated. It encouraged time for personal wellbeing and enjoyment and brought our partners closer together – the perfect combination. 
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		A big thank you!
	
		 
	
		This short video is a mini celebration of the fantastic work of our Wellbeing Team in 2023 and we'd like to extend our huge thanks to them all from everyone at DJS. We can't wait to see what ideas they have in store for us in 2024! 
	
		 
	  
	
		 
	
		 
	
		 


	
	
		
				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Placing-wellbeing-at-the-heart-of-DJS-Research
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					Expanding our public sector team
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				<description>
					
	
		
	
		 
	
		Last year we welcomed 15 new starters to DJS Research across all areas of our business. Every new partner brings fresh ideas, a new perspective and invaluable experience, and no where have we felt this to greater positive effect than in the growth of our public sector team.
	
		 
	
		In 2023 we were delighted to onboard three new researchers who each bring a specialist skill set and extensive policy area knowledge to strengthen our excellent public sector offering. January sees the continuation of this growth with a fourth addition to our public sector team, helping to further consolidate our expertise in this market.
	
		 
	
		Read on for an overview of the skill and specialisms of our newest partners who are already boosting the power of the DJS Research public sector team:
	
		 
	
		Matt Bristow  
	
		Research Director
	
		
	
		Matt rejoined DJS Research back in May and has a wealth of public engagement experience, having worked across consultations for central and local government on key projects including local government reorganisation and the devolution / levelling up of English regions. Matt also has extensive knowledge of transport research having worked with both central government and sub-national transport bodies including Transport for Greater Manchester and the Department of Transport. 
	
		 
	
		Vicky Mullis 
	
		Senior Research Manager 
	
		
	
		We welcomed Vicky to DJS Research in May and her extensive experience conducting research with complex, and often technical subject matter combined with her knowledge of the cultural sector has already enhanced our public sector team. Vicky has delivered long term trackers for many major venues across the UK and she has played a pivotal role in shaping policy development across public services, including culture, environment, trade and taxation. 
	
		 
	
		Ajit Chauhan 
	
		Senior Research Manager 
	
		
	
		Ajit joined us in August bringing over ten years' public sector experience and a background specialising in transport research. In addition to wide ranging qualitative and quantitative skills, Ajit has a keen interesting in exploring how innovative methodologies and techniques can be developed and harnessed to best effect in public sector research. 
	
		 
	
		Chris Rigby 
	
		Associate Director 
	
		
	
		Last but by no means least, Chris joined us on January 8th with a wealth of experience running complex local government research projects. Chris specialises in conducting research around public infrastructure projects and has an indepth knowledge of transport research, having most recently been leading a large-scale insight programme for HS2 Ltd. 
	
		 


	Get more DJS News: 

	We presented at the MRS Sustainability Summit 2023

	 

	Challenging ourselves to 'Get up and Go' this January

	 

	Introducing our charity of the year for 2024 – Blythe House Hospicecare and Helen's Trust

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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Expanding-our-public-sector-team
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Expanding-our-public-sector-team
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					DJS Research - Review of the Year 2023
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				<description>
					
	

	 

	                 A huge thank you to our clients, respondents, suppliers and employee partners

	 

	Another year over – and again it's been a positive one for DJS Research, despite feeling like a more challenging year for the industry overall. We've continued to recruit more talent across all areas of the business, have promoted many of our hardworking team and have also seen client growth, particularly within the public sector (with some exciting plans in the pipeline!).

	 

	
		We have also continued upon our mission to make DJS Research an even better place to work for our people and for the planet, with an increased focus on corporate and social responsibility and employee wellbeing. This year we launched our first Employee Wellbeing Survey which has given us some great inspiration and direction for future change, and we've become one of 13,000 employers in the UK to pay a real Living Wage to all of our partners. 
				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Review-of-the-Year-2023
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Review-of-the-Year-2023
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					Introducing our charity of the year for 2024 – Blythe House Hospicecare and Helen's Trust
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Introducing-our-charity-of-the-year-for-2024-Blythe-House-Hospicecare-and-Helens-Trust
				</link>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Introducing-our-charity-of-the-year-for-2024-Blythe-House-Hospicecare-and-Helens-Trust
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					We presented at the MRS Sustainability Summit 2023
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-presented-at-the-MRS-Sustainability-Summit-2023
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-presented-at-the-MRS-Sustainability-Summit-2023
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					Our research finds that over half of parents will give Christmas Eve gifts
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				<description>
					
	

	 

	By Research Director, Helen Menzies

	 

	I don't remember Christmas Eve boxes being a 'thing' when I was little (maybe just not in my house?!) but increasingly over the years I've heard more and more families talk about them. A quick Google presents me with plenty of options for every budget, with retailers from Card Factory to Fortnum  Mason offering Christmas Eve boxes and fillers.

	 

	I wanted to find out what parents are planning to do this year and what sort of things are going into these boxes, so we turned to our in-house panel to find out! Opinion Exchange is our panel of over 20,000 people in the UK who have signed up to take part in market research. We sent out an online poll to some parents on the panel and we quickly received just over 600 responses.

	 

	Our research shows that 59% of parents will be giving a Christmas Eve box/some kind of gift on Christmas Eve:

	 

	Will you be giving your child(ren) a 'Christmas Eve box' and/or a present on Christmas Eve?

	

	Base: 604 parents.

	 

	Amongst the 59% who plan to give some kind of Christmas Eve gift, we found that in general it is less about the gift per se (or indeed the box) and more about creating a special experience or atmosphere.  Whilst some parents are giving an item from under the tree before the big day, the most common gifts are:

	 

	

	bull; Cosy Christmas clothing (pyjamas, fluffy socks)

	bull; Treats such as chocolate, sweets or hot chocolate

	bull; A book

	bull; A DVD/choosing a new movie online

	bull; Pampering items (bath bombs, face masks)

	bull; Craft activities

	 

	
		"I like the idea but its only a little gift of pyjamas and hot chocolate. Not a big gift."
		Parent
				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-research-finds-that-over-half-of-parents-will-give-Christmas-Eve-gifts
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					Time-out to Grow Together: Sunflowers and Wellbeing at DJS
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				<description>
					
	

	 

	
		Wellbeing has become a huge focus at DJS Research and back in May our dedicated Wellbeing Team had an idea to help the company come together through the planting and growing of sunflowers! This follows the launch of our first internal DJS Wellbeing Survey earlier in the year.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Time-out-to-Grow-Together-Sunflowers-and-Wellbeing-at-DJS
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Time-out-to-Grow-Together-Sunflowers-and-Wellbeing-at-DJS
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					MRS Gen Z Summit: Our Key Takeaways
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/MRS-Gen-Z-Summit-Our-Key-Takeaways
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/MRS-Gen-Z-Summit-Our-Key-Takeaways
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					Huge congrats to Alex Scaife for passing the MRS Advanced Certificate in Market and Social Research Practice!
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Huge-congrats-to-Alex-Scaife-for-passing-the-MRS-Advanced-Certificate-in-Market-and-Social-Research-Practice
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Huge-congrats-to-Alex-Scaife-for-passing-the-MRS-Advanced-Certificate-in-Market-and-Social-Research-Practice
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					SRE Olivia Holt has been awarded the MRS Advanced Certificate!
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				<description>
					
	

	 

	We would like to congratulate Olivia Holt for passing the MRS Advanced Certificate in Market and Social Research Practice!

	 

	Olivia has been studying for the qualification alongside her role as a Senior Research Executive and has been supported in her studies by The Research Academy. 

	 

	The MRS advanced certificate is the "leading, fastest growing, degree level vocational qualification for the research sector", according to the Market Research Society and gives candidates the opportunity to learn and understand all of the principles underpinning all stages in the research process, and to develop the skills required to enable them to design and carry out key research tasks. 

	 

	
		The MRS Advanced Certificate at DJS Research is open to executives with around 18 months of research experience and our researchers have support from The Research Academy -- an external body that helps guide the learning and studying for the certificate, providing tutors, and much more. 


	 

	Managing Director of DJS Research, Al Gleed, said: "The MRS Advanced Certificate provides a fantastic grounding in research so we're very happy to support our people if they want to complete it. It takes some commitment and it is not easy - so to pass, especially with a merit, is brilliant. Well done Olivia!" 

	 

	DJS Founder and Chairman, Danny Sims, also commented: "Brilliant news Olivia! Really well done. It is some achievement - and not easy to pass at all!! You continue to go from strength to strength."

	 

	The Research Academy's Mia Lorenz also offered her congratulations, saying: "Congrats, Olivia, you smashed it! We're all incredibly proud of you and look forward to following what will surely be a stellar career! Danny Sims, you have a knack of hiring some very bright sparks!"

	
		 
	
		We asked Olivia to share a few words about her experience studying for the qualification and she told us: "Whilst studying for the MRS Advanced Certificate alongside working my day job was challenging, I'm glad I took the plunge and decided to do it! Studying for the certificate has definitely filled gaps in my knowledge and has taught me more about different methodologies that I'll continue to use in the future. Thank you DJS for giving me the opportunity and support needed to complete the certification."
	
		 
	
		Olivia is the first executive to achieve the certificate since partnering with The Research Academy. We currently have two other Research Executives studing for the qualification too -- so watch this space! 
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/SRE-Olivia-Holt-has-been-awarded-the-MRS-Advanced-Certificate
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/SRE-Olivia-Holt-has-been-awarded-the-MRS-Advanced-Certificate
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					Wales Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Welsh market research refers to the systematic process of collecting, analysing and interpreting data related to consumer behaviour and economic trends within the region of Wales. Welsh market research focuses specifically on Wales, rather than the rest of the United Kingdom. It looks to gain insights into the factors influencing business and consumer activities in this region.
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				<title>
					Scotland Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Scottish market research refers to process of analysing, collecting and interpreting data related to Scotland. This is normally the economic environment within Scotland, consumer behaviour of the Scottish people and market trends in Scotland. This market research aims to furnish businesses, organisations and policymakers located in Scotland with valuable findings and information which will benefit their future projects.
				</description>
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				<title>
					Kids Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Kids market research refers to qualitative or quantitative research with children, typically under the age of 16.  Market research with children and young people is a specialist skill and involves additional safeguarding considerations.   
				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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				<title>
					User Research (User Experience Research / UX)
				</title>
				<description>
					
 User research encompasses a range of approaches which can utilised to understand how users experience or use a product or service and what they expect from it. When interacting with a product or service, people are not typically seeking the interaction itself, but rather the end result or the solution to a problem. In the long run, successful user research and on-going user experience research will save time and development costs. It is a wider field but includes User Experience (UX) research.
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				<title>
					Customer Experience (CX) Research
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				<description>
					
 Customer experience, also known as CX, is the entire experience a customer has with a business when using a service or buying a product. It includes each step of the buying process, from navigating the website to buying the product and then receiving the product/service in person. In a shortened term, it is a holistic view of the whole interaction between a customer/potential customer and the business or brand.

  

 Customer experience is no longer a unique thing that differentiates a company, as now it is one of the most important things people think about when making purchases, almost as important as the actual product itself. In fact, 80% of people consider CX to be as important as the product itself, meaning it can be the difference between someone buying your product and a competitor's product, as 4 in 5 people are looking out for the best experience with a company as possible.

  

 Customer experience also ties in very closely with user experience (UX). User experience is almost the opposite of CX. It adopts a more reductionist view because it is all about a singular customer touchpoint (interaction) - rather than the entire process a customer goes through. For example, the first customer touchpoint might be seeing a brand's advert on social media, so the UX would be purely focused on the customer's interaction when seeing the advert for the first time.

  

 In terms of customer experience research, many methods are involved in conducting the research. A few of these which we use are:

  

 
  Customer journey mapping


 
  Interviews, surveys and focus groups


 
  Ethnography


 
  Behavioural science


  

 The benefits of conducting CX research are that you can begin to see where improvements are needed to attract new customers or repeatedly bring back old customers, you can begin to strengthen or build a relationship between you and your customers, you can gain a positive reputation and you can also grow your business as a whole from the information discovered when conducting CX research.
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				<title>
					Health and Well-being Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Health and well-being market research refers to the study and analysis of consumer preferences, behaviours and attitudes related to health and wellness. It helps businesses understand the ever-changing needs of customers in this sector. This then allows for marketing campaigns to be correctly targeted and products to be made and designed specifically to meet the needs and demands present, helping to promote healthier lifestyles.

  

 The health and well-being sector requires a lot of interaction between the consumer and the researcher to allow the researcher to fully understand what demands they want to be met and what their preferences are when it comes to something they would buy or something that would help them develop a healthy lifestyle. People's health and well-being are likely to be very different for everyone, as it is quite a personal topic so making sure the market research incorporates and listens to everyones' views is crucial. Otherwise, a marketing campaign or product may not be suited to many customers, forcing companies to miss out on sales.

  

 Health and well-being is a topic that many are familiar with, however a lot of organisations would like to understand it more and learn about what it actually is and the opportunities it can present. Well-being in simple terms is ultimately what is good for that person and what is in the self-interest of that person. Products can range from luxury candles to supplements and oils and also simple things like sleeping masks. 

  

 With many companies not being hugely knowledgeable on the topic, it leaves potential and opportunities to step into the market. Especially in terms of health and well-being market research because there is more research and investigating to be done in this sector as it holds many openings. To add to that, it can be something companies can learn more about in order to treat their employees as well as possible and keep everyone working for them happy and healthy.
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				<title>
					Sustainable Marketing
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Sustainable marketing, also known as green marketing, is the promotion of environmentally and socially responsible products, practices and brands. For example, if you have bought something at a higher price than usual because it is locally sourced or 100% recyclable then you have experienced sustainable marketing. Sustainable marketing aims to improve the quality of life by promoting products, services and ideas that don't harm the environment.

  

 In terms of market research, sustainable marketing can come into play if you are creating a new promotion, campaign, or advert with one of your clients. You can introduce the key aspects into the report or presentation for your client. This is so they know who they can target and what specific topic of sustainability they need to target to attract as many customers as possible or improve their company in the way that their customers would like. When the market research company encourages this and includes this information in the reports they put together, it makes it easy for their clients to adopt. Sustainable marketing in the market research world ties in closely to sustainability market research.

  

 Sustainability and being green is becoming a big thing for many people and customers expect to see their favourite companies adopt green methods. Sustainable marketing is easy to introduce to help make a step in the right direction, as it comes with low costs and only requires a few tweaks to the current marketing strategy.

  

 Examples of sustainable marketing are very common to come across today. For example, Nike introduced Nike Forward which is a lightweight material that aims to lower the brand's carbon footprint by 75%, compared to the traditional knit materials they have previously used. This material being used and promoted is sustainable marketing.
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				<title>
					Environmental Sustainability
				</title>
				<description>
					
 In market research, environmental sustainability refers to the introduction of sustainable practices into the process of carrying out market research projects. You have to consider and evaluate the impact of your market research activities, whilst also seeking ways to reduce any negative effects and promote sustainable alternatives.

  

 Ways sustainability market research can be introduced:

  

 One way of bringing environmental sustainability into research studies is through efficient sampling. For example, this could include reducing the number of participants needed for the research. This means always selecting the most representative sample and consistently picking out the target audience for the research, not people who don't meet the requirements. Resulting in; resources and energy being saved and not being unnecessarily used.

  

 Another way to integrate sustainability into your research studies is through apps like Microsoft Teams and Skype, where virtual calls, meetings, and conferences can be held. Using these platforms reduces the need for travelling, helping to reduce carbon emissions, especially when dealing with international clients who usually use a plane to travel. Focus groups and product testing can also be virtual, which saves a group of people travelling to the same location using different methods of transport.

  

 One more key aspect is eco-friendly data collection. This could be something simple like conducting an online survey, rather than using the traditional paper method. Allowing paper waste to be reduced. As well as that, the carbon emissions from the process of making and transporting paper can be lowered.

  

 By being environmentally sustainable when carrying out research, you are able to pick up a positive reputation, this is something many clients look for as there is a growing importance surrounding saving the planet and being eco-friendly. Therefore, this could be the difference between winning a project or not winning one, as people and businesses want to be associated with sustainable organisations. So, by integrating environmental sustainability into market research practices and processes, businesses can reduce their environmental impact and build a great reputation.
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					Behaviour modification
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Behaviour modification is when a person's behaviour is changed over time, which will often be used to reinforce positive actions. Often using negative and positive reinforcements, it is a part of behavioural science market research. Once previous patterns of someone's behaviour have been observed, certain factors could be used to alter the behaviour towards a more desired outcome in real world scenarios.

  

 As well as being effective at treating obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, behaviour modification has been shown to decrease crime rates. A study showed that a group of children in a 'medication group' committed double the number of crimes as those in a 'behaviour modification group' over several years. This shows that not only can genetic disorders be treated, but also learned behaviours can be changed with behaviour modification.

  

 Behaviour modification is used in our day-to-day lives; for example, telling a child to sit on the 'naughty step' is a form of negative punishment – an effective behaviour modification technique. Negative punishment is when something is taken away as a result of bad behaviour. On the other hand, some children may respond better to positive punishment – another effective form of behaviour modification – where a negative consequence is given as a result of negative behaviour; for example, giving children more chores.
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				<title>
					Health behaviour change
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Health behaviour change is when people commit to behaviour modification for health benefits. It is a key part of behavioural science in the medical industry as many people have illnesses from modifiable health issues; such as: bad diet, smoking, trouble sleeping and physical inactivity. On the other hand, for health behaviour change to be effective, the patient must want to change their lifestyle for it to make a difference.

  

 The behaviour change wheel shows how doctors can modify their patient's behaviour for good, as they will have to change the capability, opportunity and motivation. When altering someone's behaviour for health benefits, doctors will often start with explaining how the patient is impacting their health. Then, they would inform the patient how changing their behaviour would benefit them in the long and short term.

  

 Behavioural science research can help more people change their behaviour for health benefits as the best and most consistent methods can be observed and used most frequently; allowing doctors to provide specific care for each individual. 
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				<title>
					Behavioural change wheel
				</title>
				<description>
					
 The behavioural change wheel is a visual guide that psychologists use to understand the factors that affect behaviour. As part of behavioural science, it shows three main sections that can be used to explain how behaviours can be leant and changed. There have been 19 other models to show behavioural change, however, the behavioural change wheel is thought to be the most accurate as it uses all the previous models.

  

 The inner circle of the wheel (often green) shows the sources for behaviour: capability, opportunity and motivation, which make up the core features of our behaviour. They, also, make up the model's main equation: COM = B (capability, opportunity and motivation = behaviour). The model explains that everyone's behaviour is dictated by their capability, opportunity and motivation; however, these can also be changed over time.

  

 The next circle within the behaviour change wheel (often red) contains the intervention functions that can affect and change the core sources of behaviour: education, persuasion, incentivization, coercion, training, restriction, environmental restructuring, modelling and enablement. Each of the functions have the ability to change a person's behaviour in different ways, however, they can all change at least one of the sources for behaviour.

  

 The third, and final, part of the behavioural change wheel is the policy categories (often grey) which form the outer-most circle of the model. The policies are the factors that enable the interventions, and consist of: environmental/social planning, communication/marketing, legislation, service provision, regulation, fiscal measure and guidelines. 
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				<title>
					Human behaviour studies
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Human behavioural studies is the study of how humans react to the environment around them. Psychologists have developed many ways to observe human behaviour that are now used in behavioural science market research. Understanding how and why humans behave is important in almost everything we do: from predicting what your opponents will do in a football match, to understanding which products customers will most likely pick from the shelves. Psychologists have uncovered many ways to study human behaviour...

  

 Introspection method – The introspection method is when an individual explains their feelings and experiences to another person. The person receiving the information will be able to get a better understanding through what they're told, rather than through what they can simply observe.

  

 Observation method – This method uses the researcher's observational skills to gain information about another person. This is better performed in a natural environment when the participant doesn't, necessarily, know they are being observed at that particular point – this makes their behaviour more natural.

  

 Experimental method – The experimental method will, often, be performed in a lab under controlled conditions and will be used to measure the effect that one variable has on another. For example, whether listening to certain music increases or decrease heart rate.

  

 Clinical method – Most commonly used in hospitals, the clinical method is when the information about an individual can be gathered from other sources, such as other people or medical records.

  

 Survey method – This method is used to gather information from large groups via surveys and questionnaires. It is best used to quickly gather large amounts of information and can be gathered from further afield.

  

 Genetic method – The genetic method allows researchers to understand an individual's behaviour through past experiences; especially from childhood.
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				<title>
					MINDSPACE behaviour change
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				<description>
					
 Mindspace behaviour change is a framework that can be used to help people decide if they want to commit to behaviour modification. It comes under behavioural science as it is the first step in understanding a change in behaviour. The 'MINDSPACE' anagram is used in many different scenarios as a way to either change or enforce behaviours. The letters of 'MINDSPACE' stand for: messenger, incentives, norms, defaults, silence, priming, affects, commitment and ego.

  

 Messenger – A behaviour modification is more likely to occur if the information about the change is being told by someone we trust. For example, you're more likely to listen to a close friend that you trust over someone you haven't met before.

  

 Incentives – What we get out of the change or what we avoid. Research has shown that avoiding a loss or negative outcome is more incentivising than a reward.

  

 Norms – People will act based on what they see others do around them. If they regularly encounter a certain behaviour, they are more likely to adopt that behaviour than one they don't see as regularly.

  

 Defaults – Everyone has their own behaviour and changing that will prove to be a challenge. To begin changing behaviour you must first try to block out the behaviour that you're trying to lose.

  

 Silence – Trying to relate certain messages to yourself to make them seem more relevant. If something is irrelevant, then it can appear as if it's not actually there.

  

 Priming – Surrounding yourself with images, sounds, and smells that promote the new behaviour. Some people may feel relaxed by certain sounds and agitated by others.

  

 Affects – Creating a positive mood will, most likely, encourage you to behave in a more positive way. Common behaviours that people try to avoid, such as smoking or excessive eating, are most common when the environment isn't right.

  

 Commitment – How willing the individual is to make behaviour modifications. It has been proven that making new goals public will make you more committed.

  

 Ego – People act in a way that they wish to be seen. The ones who want to be viewed as healthy will likely exercise and eat well; whereas those who want to be seen as boisterous will likely act so.
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					Consumer Behaviour Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Consumer behaviour market research is a type of research that studies how customers behave and what makes them choose certain products and falls under the broad category of behavioural science. This data can help the company know how to package and sell their products in order to make new customers and keep existing ones. There are many ways the behaviour of the consumer can be observed, including: face-to-face interviews, email surveys and direct observation. It is also an effective way of knowing what the company's competitors are doing better in the eyes of the consumer.

  

 A big part of consumer behaviour is system 1 and 2 thinking – how we make decisions. System 1 is initial thoughts and is how we make most of our decisions. System 2 is when we make a decision based on more in-depth facts. For example, if a customer is deciding which packet of cereal to buy, they will most likely make their decision on the packaging (system 1), however, they could make their decision based on ingredients or calories (system 2).

  

 A further important factor to understand consumer behaviour is a company's brand equity. Good relations between a company and their customers will create a positive brand equity and increase sales over their competitors. A negative brand equity, commonly instigated by poor products or customer services, will change the consumer behaviour.
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					Behavioural Economics Research
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				<description>
					
 Behavioural economics is a research method often used by psychologists to study people's decision making, and comes under the category of behavioural science. It is performed in research studies to better understand a customer's reasoning behind their responses by making sense of their subconscious decisions. Market researchers are using behavioural economics more and more because of its effectiveness at limiting bias and its ability to allow the researchers to greater understand the reasons behind the consumer's decisions.

  

 The psychologist Daniel Kahneman explains two modes describing the way humans think: system 1 (fast mode) and system 2 (slow mode). 'Fast mode' is used in situations such as simple Maths and is how researchers want participants to make decisions. Researchers keep participants in system 1 by applying time pressure as to ensure they do not become too logical in their thinking. System 2, however, is the more rational way of thinking and allows for the consumer to deliberate all the details to make a more informative decision. 

  

 It is thought that over 80% of decisions are made in 'fast mode' as it's an unconscious, initial response to a situation – it is how a consumer first decides if they like a product or not and is the mode that branding and marketing primarily appeals to. Fast mode also explains how people are able to complete their shopping in a few minutes or hours, while being faced with thousands of different options.
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					Statistical Analysis
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				<description>
					
 Statistical analysis is the process a researcher goes through to uncover patterns and trends within data. The researcher may also choose to use a computer programme to assist in sorting through the data, so a more complex analysis can be performed. Statistical analysis is used as it is a quantitative way to help eliminate bias from a research study. The patterns that statistical analysis uncover can help predict future trends in an industry to help a company stay ahead of the competition. When conducting statistical analysis, many researchers will put the data into graphs or tables as it makes the patterns easier to view. When done correctly, they will show how each data point correlates with the other data points.

  

 Statistical analysis is used in all industries to view progression and to predict future trends. One of the most important is in the health industry and its use of medication. When new medicines are first introduced, statistical analysis is used in order to find out the effect it has on the body and whether the medicine is reacting in the way it is supposed to. For example, a new drug is used to cure a disease, however many people who have taken the medicine experience headaches and breathing difficulties. When statistical analysis is performed, it may be found that all the people with these side effects have asthma, and the medicine is reacting with it.
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					Standard Deviation
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Standard deviation is used in analysing statistics and is a measure of the variation from the data set to the mean – the bigger the variation, the higher the standard deviation. When conducting a research study, a low variation is ideal because it indicates a low range in the data set and that all the points of data are similar. A higher deviation suggests a less reliable research study because the data points are more spread out. 

  

 When presenting research findings after the study is completed, researchers will often use the mean to show the results as it is easier to understand. However, the mean can be misleading as a whole set of data is represented as a single figure. When a set of data is presented as a mean or average, standard deviation should also be used to add more information. For example, if eight friends shared a pizza with eight slices, the mean number of slices each person gets will be one. However, the standard deviation is one slice, meaning someone didn't get a slice and someone else got two. The use of standard deviation changes the statistic, even though it is actually the same. Presenting the standard deviation, alongside the mean, will give more information and be just as simple to understand.
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					Statistical Significance
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Statistical significance is used by market researchers to ensure their findings have not occurred by chance, and are reliable. For a research finding to be statistically significant, the researcher must show it is at least 95% probable, allowing for an error margin of 5%; this means that if the study was repeated 100 times, a minimum of 95 test results would be the same. In market research, it is highly unlikely that a research study will include all of a target population or be without bias, which makes statistical significance important in demonstrating the reliability of the findings.

  

 To calculate the statistical significance of a finding, the researcher will conduct either a T-test or a Z-test. A T-test assesses whether the findings were a result of chance by checking if two independent groups have the same mean. A Z-test checks the significance of a finding by checking if two independent groups have an equal population proportion. If the tests prove that the mean or proportion are equal, the findings will not be statistically significant.

  

 An important factor that could prevent a finding from being statistically significant is sampling error. Sampling error is when the participants selected for a research study are not representative of the whole target population. In this case, the results will not reflect the whole population correctly, meaning there is no statistical significance.
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					Recruitment Screener
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A recruitment screener is a series of qualifying questions used by market researchers to identify if the selection of participants accurately reflects the target population. They are also used to assess if a candidate fits the criteria for a particular research study. While most of the questions will be closed questions to illicit specific answers from the participant, the recruitment screener should also include some open questions as to help better understand the candidate.

  

 To save time, screeners will be conducted over the phone or online; therefore, if the participant isn't selected, they haven't had to travel anywhere. Most recruitment screeners will find out the occupation of the participant as they could work for the company being researched or for a market research company themselves, meaning their answers may be biased. Furthermore, eliciting the participant's age, along with where they work and live are often key points when conducting market research. Setting parameters for the study will help eliminate possible candidates to ensure the selection of participants reflects the target population accurately. Once the candidates have all been given the recruitment screener, the market researchers will select the participants who they think will make up the most accurate representation of the target population, or who they think will be most insightful. 

  

 Recruitment screeners are useful in making a research study more valid and tailored better for the individual study. 
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					Multi-Modal Research
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				<description>
					
 Multi-modal research is a type of market research where the respondent is asked to comment on a product using the five senses – smell, sight, sound, taste and touch. This methodology is most used in industries such as food and drink or music, as the business is oriented toward a specific sense. 

  

 Although these industries can be solely associated with one sense, a collection of the other senses can be used to assess and form an opinion about the product. For example, in the food industry, a meal would have to taste good but also look and smell appetising with a texture the customer likes. Multi-modal research would allow the participant to express their feelings for the brand using all the senses available to them.

  

 Multi-modal research can also be used to describe research where different methodologies are used; such as focus groups or an online community. It can be an effective way at saving time and money as you can do a lot of the research and get to know the participants online within an online community. An in-depth observation can then be made during a focus group when the researcher knows a little bit about the participants. 

  

 Performing online market research prior to the actual study could also be insightful for the researcher as to who they choose to observe in a real-life setting. For example, if the participants were asked to give their views on a beef burger, a participant who knows a lot about fast food would likely give a more insightful opinion.
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					One in three workers have quit a job due to bad management, survey finds
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				<description>
					
 One in three workers have quit a job due to bad management, survey finds: Research conducted by the Chartered Management Institute (CMI) and YouGov has found a third of UK workers say they have left a job because of bad management and negative workplace culture. Furthermore, half of workers who describe their bosses as 'ineffective' say they plan to leave their current role within the next year.
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/One-in-three-workers-have-quit-a-job-due-to-bad-management-survey-finds-05600
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					63% of UK energy groups plan moves to more sustainable markets, survey finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 63% of UK energy groups plan moves to more sustainable markets: A recent survey has found that over 6 in 10 (63%) UK energy groups plan moves to 'more sustainable' markets, with many having already moved to new markets that are "more supportive of their sustainability goals".
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/63percent-of-UK-energy-groups-plan-moves-to-more-sustainable-markets-survey-finds-05599
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/63percent-of-UK-energy-groups-plan-moves-to-more-sustainable-markets-survey-finds-05599
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					73% of GP registras are experiencing stress, anxiety or depression whilst working in general practice
				</title>
				<description>
					
 73% of GP registras are experiencing stress, anxiety or depression whilst working in general practice: A recent survey has revealed the extent of pressures on GP registras with almost three quarters of those surveyed by the BMA experiencing stress, anxiety or depression working in general practice.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/73percent-of-GP-registras-are-experiencing-stress-anxiety-or-depression-whilst-working-in-general-practice-05598
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/73percent-of-GP-registras-are-experiencing-stress-anxiety-or-depression-whilst-working-in-general-practice-05598
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					More than half of charities are at "full capacity" because of cost-of-living pressures, survey finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 More than half of charities are at "full capacity" because of cost-of-living pressures, survey finds: A survey has found that over half of charities are at full capacity because of cost-of-living pressures, with some charities having to turn away people in need.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/More-than-half-of-charities-are-at-full-capacity-because-of-cost-of-living-pressures-survey-finds-05597
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/More-than-half-of-charities-are-at-full-capacity-because-of-cost-of-living-pressures-survey-finds-05597
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Seven in ten councils are unsure if they can balance their 2024 budget, recent survey finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Seven in ten councils are unsure if they can balance their 2024 budget: A recent survey has found that 7 in 10 councils are unsure if they can balance their 2024 budget due to increasing financial pressures. Before the 2023 Autumn Statement, just 4 in 10 of the councils surveyed said they weren't confident they could balance their budget but this has now risen to 7 in 10.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Seven-in-ten-councils-are-unsure-if-they-can-balance-their-2024-budget-recent-survey-finds-05596
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Seven-in-ten-councils-are-unsure-if-they-can-balance-their-2024-budget-recent-survey-finds-05596
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					UK shoppers prefer free delivery over delivery speed, survey finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/UK-shoppers-prefer-free-delivery-over-delivery-speed-survey-finds-05594
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/UK-shoppers-prefer-free-delivery-over-delivery-speed-survey-finds-05594
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Volunteers from marginalised ethnic groups are volunteering less due to cost of living crisis, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Volunteers from marginalised ethnic groups are volunteering less due to cost of living crisis: According to a survey conducted by Human Appeal, 38% of volunteers from Black, Asian, and minority ethnic groups have reduced their volunteering commitments due to the cost-of-living crisis. In comparison, 30% of volunteers from none marginalised ethnic groups have made similar adjustments for the same reason.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Volunteers-from-marginalised-ethnic-groups-are-volunteering-less-due-to-cost-of-living-crisis-finds-survey-05541
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Volunteers-from-marginalised-ethnic-groups-are-volunteering-less-due-to-cost-of-living-crisis-finds-survey-05541
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Rail passengers could almost double by 2050, research finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Rail passengers could almost double by 2050: According to a new report by the Railway Industry Association (RIA), rail passenger numbers could almost double by 2050. The report found that rail passenger volumes could grow by at least 37% but may increase by as much as 97% in the next 25 years. These figures equate to an average growth rate of between 1.6% and 3% per year.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Rail-passengers-could-almost-double-by-2050-research-finds-05595
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Rail-passengers-could-almost-double-by-2050-research-finds-05595
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Brexit has completely failed for the UK according to the majority of Brits, finds recent poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Brexit has completely failed for the UK according to the majority of Brits: A recent poll has found that Brexit has completely failed for the UK according to the majority of the British public, with just 22% of respondents believing that leaving the EU has had a good impact on the UK in general. Almost 50% believed that it has had a bad impact.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Brexit-has-completely-failed-for-the-UK-according-to-the-majority-of-Brits-finds-recent-poll-05593
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Brexit-has-completely-failed-for-the-UK-according-to-the-majority-of-Brits-finds-recent-poll-05593
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Nearly half of UK teachers have come across homeless pupils, survey finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Nearly half of teachers have come across homeless pupils, survey finds: A recent survey has found that almost half of teachers at state schools in the UK have encountered pupils who are or have become homeless in the past year, with Charity Shelter's results suggesting that teachers think the problem is going to get worse this year (2024).
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Nearly-half-of-UK-teachers-have-come-across-homeless-pupils-survey-finds-05592
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Nearly-half-of-UK-teachers-have-come-across-homeless-pupils-survey-finds-05592
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					The best and worst car hire companies in 2024, according to Which? survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 The best and worst car hire companies in 2024, according to Which? survey: A recent survey by Which? has revealed the best and worst car hire companies in 2024, with AutoReisen and Cicar ranked as the most highly recommended providers after receiving a customer rating score of 91%. However, if you wish to use the top two rated car hire companies you'll need to take a holiday in the Canary Islands that's where their services are available!
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/The-best-and-worst-car-hire-companies-in-2024-according-to-Which-survey-05591
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/The-best-and-worst-car-hire-companies-in-2024-according-to-Which-survey-05591
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Nearly 8 in 10 kids want new technologies in sports coverage, recent survey finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Nearly 8 in 10 kids want new technologies in sports coverage: According to a recent survey, nearly 8 in 10 (79%) kids want new technologies to be introduced in coverage of sports that they watch. The most popular technological development children want to see are smart balls with built-in sensors and cameras in footballs (both 31%).
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Nearly-8-in-10-kids-want-new-technologies-in-sports-coverage-recent-survey-finds-05590
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Nearly-8-in-10-kids-want-new-technologies-in-sports-coverage-recent-survey-finds-05590
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Nearly 85% of patients on ADHD medicine have been affected by shortages, new survey finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Nearly 85% of patients on ADHD medicine have been affected by shortages: According to a new survey by the charity ADHD UK, around 85% of patients on ADHD medication have been affected by shortages, with only 8% of patients having received an uninterrupted supply of medicine since recent shortages began.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Nearly-85percent-of-patients-on-ADHD-medicine-have-been-affected-by-shortages-new-survey-finds-05589
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Nearly-85percent-of-patients-on-ADHD-medicine-have-been-affected-by-shortages-new-survey-finds-05589
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Over a third of users consider e-scooters to be the most efficient mode of transport in terms of both time and cost, recent survey finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Over a third of users consider e-scooters to be the most efficient mode of transport in terms of both time and cost: A recent survey has found that over a third of people who use e-scooters (36%) consider them to be the most efficient mode of transportation, saving them both time and money.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Over-a-third-of-users-consider-e-scooters-to-be-the-most-efficient-mode-of-transport-in-terms-of-both-time-and-cost-recent-survey-finds-05586
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Over-a-third-of-users-consider-e-scooters-to-be-the-most-efficient-mode-of-transport-in-terms-of-both-time-and-cost-recent-survey-finds-05586
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Over 7 in 10 engineering employers in the UK do not have the skills needed to be resilient to climate change, survey finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Over 7 in 10 engineering employers in the UK do not have the skills needed to be resilient to climate change: A new survey by the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) has found that over 7 in 10 (77%) UK engineering employers don't have the skills needed to be resilient to climate change, with 65% of workers at UK firms worried about the impact climate change may have on their organization.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Over-7-in-10-engineering-employers-in-the-UK-do-not-have-the-skills-needed-to-be-resilient-to-climate-change-survey-finds-05588
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Over-7-in-10-engineering-employers-in-the-UK-do-not-have-the-skills-needed-to-be-resilient-to-climate-change-survey-finds-05588
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Nine in ten small and medium-sized businesses have at least one member of staff working from home, BT survey finds
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Nine in ten small and medium-sized businesses have at least one member of staff working from home: A new survey by BT has found that UK SMEs (small and medium-sized businesses) are upping their use of cloud services in a bid to provide more flexible working conditions for employees, with nine in ten (91%) SMEs having at least one person working from home.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Nine-in-ten-small-and-medium-sized-businesses-have-at-least-one-member-of-staff-working-from-home-BT-survey-finds-05587
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Nine-in-ten-small-and-medium-sized-businesses-have-at-least-one-member-of-staff-working-from-home-BT-survey-finds-05587
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Survey of high net worth collectors reveals women spent more on art than men this year
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey of high net worth collectors reveals women spent more on art than men this year: A survey of high net worth (HNW) individuals has found that in the first half of 2023, women spent more on art than men, spending a median of $72,500 compared with $59,400 spent by male collectors. This follows a trend of the past two years. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-of-high-net-worth-collectors-reveals-women-spent-more-on-art-than-men-this-year-05585
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-of-high-net-worth-collectors-reveals-women-spent-more-on-art-than-men-this-year-05585
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Survey reveals that tech advances are not having a large impact on people of the UK
				</title>
				<description>
					
 New survey reveals that tech advances are not having a large impact on people of the UK: A new survey by CIPD has found that tech advances are not having a large impact on people in the UK, with only 55% of HR professionals agreeing that advancing technology is transforming the way their team operates.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-that-tech-advances-are-not-having-a-large-impact-on-people-of-the-UK-05584
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-that-tech-advances-are-not-having-a-large-impact-on-people-of-the-UK-05584
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Pupils from lower socio-economic backgrounds are less likely to have visited a museum in the past year, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Pupils from lower socio-economic backgrounds are less likely to have visited a museum in the past year: Research conducted by YouGov for the national charity Art Fund has found that children from higher socio-economic backgrounds are more likely to have visited a museum in the last year than those with lower socio-economic status. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Pupils-from-lower-socio-economic-backgrounds-are-less-likely-to-have-visited-a-museum-in-the-past-year-finds-survey-05583
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Pupils-from-lower-socio-economic-backgrounds-are-less-likely-to-have-visited-a-museum-in-the-past-year-finds-survey-05583
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					68% of people polled in global survey are in favour of solar energy
				</title>
				<description>
					
 68% of people polled in global survey are in favour of solar energy: A global survey has revealed a significant preference for solar energy among over two-thirds of the world's population (68%). This preference stands in stark contrast to the notably lower public support for fossil fuels, with just 14% in favour.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/68percent-of-people-polled-in-global-survey-are-in-favour-of-solar-energy-05582
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/68percent-of-people-polled-in-global-survey-are-in-favour-of-solar-energy-05582
				</guid>
			</item>
		</channel>
	</rss>