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			<item>
				<title>
					Be brave and seek out lateral solutions when trying to change behaviour
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				<description>
					
	
		
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Be-brave-and-seek-out-lateral-solutions-when-trying-to-change-behaviour
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					DJS staff charity sky dive finally takes place after two year pause
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		After a two-year delay due to the global pandemic (and the great British weather!), two of our DJS team members were finally able to take to the skies for a long overdue charity  sky dive! 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-staff-charity-sky-dive-finally-takes-place-after-two-year-pause
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				<title>
					DJS Chairman Danny Sims talks to Research World about our transition to employee ownership
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Chairman-Danny-Sims-talks-to-Research-World-about-our-transition-to-employee-ownership
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					Empowering the next generation: Key learnings from the MRS Kids and Youth Conference 2022
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Empowering-the-next-generation-Key-learnings-from-the-MRS-Kids-and-Youth-Conference-2022
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				<title>
					We are hiring! See our latest job opportunities
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
	
		 
	
		Are you looking for a new role in market research? We are looking to expand our brilliant research team with a number of new roles across the business! 
	
		 
	
		Despite the difficulties created by the global pandemic, DJS Research has continued to grow and has been recently named by the Market Research Society as one of the UK's 'fastest growing individual agencies'.  
	
		 
	
		We offer a hybrid model of working if you live close to one of our offices, however, we will also consider remote working positions for the right candidate, as part of our growing remote working network.
	
		 
	
		So, if you're ready to take that next step and join our friendly, employee-owned team, have a look at our current vacancies below:
	
		 
	
		
			Research Manager / Senior Research Manager or Associate Director / Research Director (Utilities)
	
	
		
	
		We have particular strength in the utilities industry and are looking for an experienced researcher in this sector, ideally someone who already works either at a Research Manager/ Senior Research Manager level or at a Associate Director / Research Director level, or is ready to make the step up.
	
		 
	
		You will be an all-rounder, experienced, with both qualitative and quantitative skills, looking for a challenge and comfortable with working within a fast-paced and growing environment. Wide-ranging experience in, and solid knowledge of, the utilities sector is a necessity.
	
		 
	
		Read the full job description and apply here 
	
		 
	
		
	
	
		
			Senior Research Manager or Associate Director (Employee Experience/Engagement :: Public Sector)
		
			We are looking for someone who ideally has experience delivering research within the employee experience/engagement sector and/or within the public or not-for-profit sectors.
		
			 
		
			You will have experience of all stages of the research process – writing or contributing to proposals, recommending the right methodological approach, designing projects, project management, data analysis and presenting findings/providing added value insights. You will also be comfortable working within a fast-paced and growing environment with a proven track record of managing ongoing accounts and client relationships. For this role we would like to hear from candidates with at least 7-10 years of research experience.   
		
			 
		
			Read the full job description and apply here
	
	
		 
	
		
	
	
		Research Manager or Senior Research Manager
	
		
	
		We are looking for someone who is an experienced researcher in both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, ideally proficient in both, and who has worked in an agency setting before.
	
		 
	
		We'd like to hear from people who have experience of all stages of the research process. It would be great if you have experience of conducting research in a range of sectors, but education, public sector and utilities is of particular interest amongst both consumer and business to business audiences.   
	
		 
	
		 
	
		Read the full job description and apply here 
	
		 
	
		
	
	
		 
	
		
			Senior Research Executive (Culture Sector)
	
	
		
	
		We're looking for a Senior Research Executive to join our Culture, Heritage and Education team!
	
		 
	
		The key part of the role will be managing key clients within a large quantitative tracking project for some of the UK's most high-profile museums and galleries. You will also have the opportunity to work in a range of other sectors including Sport, Public Sector, Education and Not for Profit.
	
		 
	
		Strong project management and quantitative research skills are essential for this role, and while previous experience working in the culture sector is not essential, an interest in museums, galleries, heritage or the wider leisure sector would be an asset.
	
		 
	
		An MRS qualification would be beneficial but not essential.
	
		 
	
		Read the full job description and apply here
	
		
	
	
		 
	
		Senior Research Executive
	
		We are looking for someone with at least three years' experience in market research, ideally proficient in both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, or open to training and development in both disciplines. You may have worked in agencies before or come from a clientside background, but you will be someone looking for a challenge and comfortable with working within a fast-paced and growing environment.  You will have experience in project management, managing multiple projects, and communicating with internal departments and clients. 
	
		 
	
		Read the full job description and apply here 
	
		 
	
		
	
	
		
			Field and Recruitment Executive
		
			We would like to hire a new Field and Recruitment Executive to help manage market research projects across the company. You will be supporting the field team in all aspects of the project process and managing field and recruitment projects, so a flexible approach is essential. 
		
			 
		
			The role is full time (7 hours per day) and on a hybrid basis with at least 2-3 days per week required at our Strines office (SK6). 
		
			 
		
			Read the full job description and apply here 
	
	
		 
	
		
	
	
		
			
		
			Entry level Market Research Jobs  Careers
		
			Ready for a new, exciting career? We are looking for researchers without experience who have an interest in research and are curious about the world!
		
			 
		
			Our entry level roles are open to school/college leavers, graduates and people looking for a new direction. We would like to hear from a diverse range of people looking to join our employee-owned research agency.
		
			 
		
			Roles are permanent, full time (Monday to Friday), however we are open to flexible working with successful candidates.
		
			 
		
			Starting salary £18k.
		
			 
		
			Read the full job description and apply here
	
	
		 


	Get more DJS News: 

	Adventures in mindfulness with the Market Research Society...

	 

	We have been named as one of the 'fastest growing individual agencies' by the Market Research Society

	 

	16 promotions and 29 new staff join our employee-owned company

				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-hiring-See-our-latest-job-opportunities
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					Adventures in mindfulness with the Market Research Society...
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		On a cold afternoon in January, a handful of curious DJS employees set down our tools, turned off our phones, and logged on to the first in a series of wellbeing webinars provided for company partner employees of the Market Research Society. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Adventures-in-mindfulness-with-the-Market-Research-Society
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					16 promotions and 29 new staff join our employee-owned company
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/16-promotions-and-29-new-staff-join-our-employee-owned-company
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				<title>
					We have been named as one of the 'fastest growing individual agencies' by the Market Research Society
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				<description>
					
	
		
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-have-been-named-as-one-of-the-fastest-growing-individual-agencies-by-the-Market-Research-Society
				</link>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-have-been-named-as-one-of-the-fastest-growing-individual-agencies-by-the-Market-Research-Society
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					The company is growing! A warm welcome to all of our new staff
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/The-company-is-growing-A-warm-welcome-to-all-of-our-new-staff
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					All change! What a year for DJS Research
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/All-change-What-a-year-for-DJS-Research
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					Introducing our new Charity of the Year: The Air Ambulance Service
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
	
		 
	
		We're very excited to announce that our charity of the year for 2021/22 will be the Air Ambulance Service (TAAS) after it was nominated by DJS staff.
	
		 
	
		It follows an incredible three years supporting the Thomas Theyer Foundation.  
	
		 
	
		Set up in 2002 as the Princess Diana National Air Ambulance for Warwickshire and Northamptonshire, TAAS was selected by DJS staff due to the care it showed our colleague, Jo Chessell, when she was airlifted to hospital earlier this year following a serious accident. 
	
		
			 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Introducing-our-new-Charity-of-the-Year-The-Air-Ambulance-Service
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				<title>
					It's been a great three years supporting The Thomas Theyer Foundation!
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				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Its-been-a-great-three-years-supporting-The-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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					DJS Research wins Thomas Challenge for exceeding fundraising goals
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				<description>
					
	
	
		We're proud to announce that we've been presented with a very special award by The Thomas Theyer Foundation, for successfully completing the charity's 'Thomas Challenge'. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-wins-Thomas-Challenge-for-exceeding-fundraising-goals
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					Richard from CATI kicks off our fundraising for The Air Ambulance Service!
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Richard-from-CATI-kicks-off-our-fundraising-for-The-Air-Ambulance-Service
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					Could sensehacking help 'lower the bar' in the battle for positive behaviour change?
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Could-sensehacking-help-lower-the-bar-in-the-battle-for-positive-behaviour-change
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Could-sensehacking-help-lower-the-bar-in-the-battle-for-positive-behaviour-change
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					DJS celebrates becoming employee-owned at 20th birthday party!
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-celebrates-becoming-employee-owned-at-20th-birthday-party
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				<title>
					We're hiring! Come and join our growing employee-owned market research agency!
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				<description>
					
	
		  
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Were-hiring-Come-and-join-our-growing-employee-owned-market-research-agency
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Were-hiring-Come-and-join-our-growing-employee-owned-market-research-agency
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					A towering success!  DJS' big day out to Blackpool
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				<description>
					
	

	
		 
	
		Didn't we have a lovely time, the day we went to Blackpool...
	
		Roller coasters, fish and chips, 2p machines and the best of British weather; the last Friday in September marked our first company-wide outing to the great Lancashire seaside town famed for its Victorian Tower, donkey rides and sticks of peppermint rock.
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/A-towering-success-DJS-big-day-out-to-Blackpool
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/A-towering-success-DJS-big-day-out-to-Blackpool
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				<title>
					Searching for meaning: a tongue in cheek look at trends on Trends
				</title>
				<description>
					
	
		
	
		Written by Elliot Simmonds, Associate Director. Email Elliot
	
		 
	
		One of the great things about the modern era is the availability of information – both to us as individual consumers, but also to those of us whose job it is to distil information down in to meaning. And by 'meaning', I mean a collection of charts which illustrate some things I find interesting or amusing. If you've come for hard-hitting analysis and insight, you're probably best reading something from Alex McCluckie.
	
		 
	
		Despite its many ills, one perceived 'positive' aspect of COVID-19, at least originally, was the opportunity to slow-down, spend some time doing those things we had always meant to do, and maybe improve ourselves as human beings a little bit. Blog posts abound on the topic. Course delivery and educational sites downed their paywalls, Audible by Amazon is giving away free digital versions of audio book classics you've always wanted to read, but never have (Paradise Lost, anyone?) and Joe Wicks is going to turn you in to an Adonis, you Adonis.[1]
	
		 
	
		At least that was the plan. But our habits are, for the most part, difficult to break - and I wanted to explore a little bit of what we'd really been getting up to. There's a lot of survey data knocking about on the topic already, and so another COVID-19 Tracker felt like one too many - although, if you are specifically interested in a culture audience, please drop me an email. 
	
		 
	
		As a free data source, with a fairly large sample size, Google Trends isn't a bad place to start. Whilst my initial focus was on habits, this quickly descended in to 'interesting stuff' and what follows is a fairly loosely connected examination of some of the things we in the UK have been searching for on Google - I hope you find it interesting, enlightening and, in some cases, amusing, in equal measure.[2]
	
		 
	
		Health and leisure
	
		Starting with that quest for fitness, we saw an initial clamour for multi-gyms which was at a five-year high.
	
		 
	
		


	 

	However, the fitness craze quickly began to drop off:

	 

	

	 

	
		And we turned to other priorities:
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		The laying of patio actually comes from personal experience - at least three members of my close friendship group (yep, 60%) have undertaken some sort of landscaping project and, generally, with a great deal of success. Given one of them is a Chartered Surveyor, this feels like the minimum expectation. 
	
		 
	
		Nevertheless, despite the rise in physical activity (it's laying a patio specifically, not searching for someone to lay a patio for you), on Saturdays, some things stayed broadly the same...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...but we also also added a more social element, in lieu of being able to go out...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...though unfortunately, in film and in hygiene, American cultural hegemony remains: [3]
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Education
	
		Thankfully (especially given the above), education remained a serious consideration, particularly early on:
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		 
	
		However, both those with primary and secondary age children alike struggled with certain aspects...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...with inevitable results...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Opportunities lost, opportunities gained...
	
		 
	
		Importantly, we quickly understood that the situation wasn't one we could get away from...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...and whilst some of us put off big decisions as a result...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...some of us saw an opportunity to improve our future.
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Others, saw an opportunity to experience something...new. That said, it's heart-warming to see a handful (excuse the pun) of early adopters in January. 
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		Closing thoughts
	
		Encouragingly, some of us started to realise what was important...
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		...and what, perhaps, wasn't.
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		But more people than ever, were asking the most important question of all:
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
	
	
		 
	
		Notes:
	
		[1] I have absolutely no connection with Amazon aside from being a customer, but I think this is such a superb offer I've linked to it here: https://stories.audible.com/discovery/enterprise-discovery-21122353011?ref=adbl_ent_anon_ds_ds_dccs_sbtp-0-5
	
		 
	
		[2] It's important to note a couple of caveats here - the first being that this is purely data from Google, and whilst Google has a huge share of the search market, it isn't 100%. The other, is the charts above show relative figures on an index across a set time period (see X-axis for all charts) - they do not show volume per se and one chart is not comparable with another. Whilst Google says...
	
		 
	
		Google Trends does filter out some types of searches, such as:
	
		 
	
		bull; Searches made by very few people: Trends only shows data for popular terms, so search terms with low volume appear as "0"
	
		 
	
		...it does not provide figures around search volume - so we don't know whether the difference between a score of 100 vs. 25 is 100,000,000 vs. 25,000,000 or whether it is 100,000 vs. 25,000. That said, I'd argue the relative change is more interesting than the absolute change anyway.
	
		 
	
		If you want to understand a little more about Google Trends and the data it includes, there's a link here:
	
		 
	
		https://support.google.com/trends/answer/4365533?hl=en
	
		 
	
		[3] Very interested to know the cause of the August 2019 spike here...any thoughts?
	
		 


	


	 

	Get more DJS News: 

	Healthwatch publishes our research looking at young people's experiences of mental healthcare

	 

	For the Love of Scrubs: What I did with my DJS Volunteering Day...

	 

	When everyone is busy being objectively similar, try cultivating your subjective difference...

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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Searching-for-meaning-a-tongue-in-cheek-look-at-trends-on-Trends
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					Jack went to Poland: What I did with my DJS volunteering day...
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	Written by Jack Watson, Research Manager

	 

	For nine months in 2016, I lived and worked in Poland completing something known then as European Voluntary Service (EVS). The programme is little-known in the UK, but enables all young people legally resident in Europe, aged between 18 and 30, to carry out an international volunteer service for NGOs, charities, or public bodies for a period ranging from two to 12 months. The only other prerequisite is that the volunteering must be done outside of your home nation. 

	 

	Before starting my research career, I wanted to live somewhere outside of the UK and this provided a unique opportunity to come into contact with a different culture and acquire new skills and abilities that would be useful for my personal and professional growth upon my return. I jumped at the chance then to go and live with four other volunteers from France, Portugal and Macedonia, where we worked in a local volunteer centre in the city of Kielce.  

	

	 

	As well as being involved in the organisation of 'International Evenings' that brought together volunteers, local students and Erasmus students, I ran weekly workshops in Communicative English and a Current Affairs discussion through a programme called Przystanek M?odych, or 'Bus Stop for Youth', which provided a free learning platform for local residents in our city, and visited local schools and universities for cultural exchange sessions and discussions on the value of volunteer work. A proudest achievement was organising a 'Human Library', where people were 'books' that you could rent out for 15-minute discussions about anything and everything to do with that person, hopefully broadening the minds of those who came along to talk and learn.

	 

	Earlier this year, before the nationwide lockdown, I was invited to return to Poland to attend a week-long conference and evaluation meeting alongside other former-volunteers because in 2018, the EVS programme was replaced by something new, called European Solidarity Corps (ESC). The overall aims of the week were to think about how better to promote ESC projects amongst young people and how to encourage and prepare volunteers to participate in them. Once a volunteer arrives, it can sometimes feel like quite a daunting experience to be dropped in an entirely different country, so we also discussed how to manage a group of international volunteers well and how to maintain motivation and commitment to these longer-term projects. 

	 

	An amazing thing about working at DJS Research is that they provide you with one day a year to volunteer for something close to your heart. My nine months in Poland were a very formative experience for me and helped shape my openness and tolerance to anyone and everyone, so I was delighted to be able to use this volunteer day (alongside some annual leave!) to head back to Kielce and discuss the merits of the programme amongst like-minded people. I'm sure everyone at DJS Research is excited to be able to use their volunteer day in the coming months as the world starts to open up a bit more; I was just lucky enough to be able to use mine right before lockdown began!

	 

	It also felt important for me to attend the conference because the UK's participation in these multinational projects is under threat as they are partly funded by Erasmus, a scheme which might end in the UK when the transition period of leaving the EU is over. COVID-19 has obviously thrown another small spanner in the works with regards to international travel but I wanted to write this blog post to highlight the fact that free travel and work opportunities are still available.  

	

	 

	If you have siblings, nieces, nephews, children who are unsure of their next steps... If you personally feel like a completely new and different challenge, then take a look at what alternative options are available to you. Living in Poland changed my outlook on life. Although I had free accommodation and local travel, I survived (and thrived) on euro;180 each month and met some lifelong friends who still today remain important people in my life. Every volunteer project is different, read up about them, find something you love the sound of and apply! There are short-term projects available through the ESC programme too for those who feel more constrained by time. It's a big world out there; we should definitely take the opportunity to explore it!

	Get more DJS News: 

	Our contribution during the Covid-19 crisis

	 

	Confirmation Bias, Market Research and Dominic Cummings

	 

	Searching for meaning: a tongue in cheek look at trends on Trends

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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Jack-went-to-Poland-What-I-did-with-my-DJS-volunteering-day
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					Behaviour modification
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Behaviour modification is when a person's behaviour is changed over time, which will often be used to reinforce positive actions. Often using negative and positive reinforcements, it is a part of behavioural science market research. Once previous patterns of someone's behaviour have been observed, certain factors could be used to alter the behaviour towards a more desired outcome in real world scenarios.

  

 As well as being effective at treating obsessive-compulsive disorder and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, behaviour modification has been shown to decrease crime rates. A study showed that a group of children in a 'medication group' committed double the number of crimes as those in a 'behaviour modification group' over several years. This shows that not only can genetic disorders be treated, but also learned behaviours can be changed with behaviour modification.

  

 Behaviour modification is used in our day-to-day lives; for example, telling a child to sit on the 'naughty step' is a form of negative punishment – an effective behaviour modification technique. Negative punishment is when something is taken away as a result of bad behaviour. On the other hand, some children may respond better to positive punishment – another effective form of behaviour modification – where a negative consequence is given as a result of negative behaviour; for example, giving children more chores.
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					Health behaviour change
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				<description>
					
 Health behaviour change is when people commit to behaviour modification for health benefits. It is a key part of behavioural science in the medical industry as many people have illnesses from modifiable health issues; such as: bad diet, smoking, trouble sleeping and physical inactivity. On the other hand, for health behaviour change to be effective, the patient must want to change their lifestyle for it to make a difference.

  

 The behaviour change wheel shows how doctors can modify their patient's behaviour for good, as they will have to change the capability, opportunity and motivation. When altering someone's behaviour for health benefits, doctors will often start with explaining how the patient is impacting their health. Then, they would inform the patient how changing their behaviour would benefit them in the long and short term.

  

 Behavioural science research can help more people change their behaviour for health benefits as the best and most consistent methods can be observed and used most frequently; allowing doctors to provide specific care for each individual. 
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					Behavioural change wheel
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 The behavioural change wheel is a visual guide that psychologists use to understand the factors that affect behaviour. As part of behavioural science, it shows three main sections that can be used to explain how behaviours can be leant and changed. There have been 19 other models to show behavioural change, however, the behavioural change wheel is thought to be the most accurate as it uses all the previous models.

  

 The inner circle of the wheel (often green) shows the sources for behaviour: capability, opportunity and motivation, which make up the core features of our behaviour. They, also, make up the model's main equation: COM = B (capability, opportunity and motivation = behaviour). The model explains that everyone's behaviour is dictated by their capability, opportunity and motivation; however, these can also be changed over time.

  

 The next circle within the behaviour change wheel (often red) contains the intervention functions that can affect and change the core sources of behaviour: education, persuasion, incentivization, coercion, training, restriction, environmental restructuring, modelling and enablement. Each of the functions have the ability to change a person's behaviour in different ways, however, they can all change at least one of the sources for behaviour.

  

 The third, and final, part of the behavioural change wheel is the policy categories (often grey) which form the outer-most circle of the model. The policies are the factors that enable the interventions, and consist of: environmental/social planning, communication/marketing, legislation, service provision, regulation, fiscal measure and guidelines. 
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					Human behaviour studies
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				<description>
					
 Human behavioural studies is the study of how humans react to the environment around them. Psychologists have developed many ways to observe human behaviour that are now used in behavioural science market research. Understanding how and why humans behave is important in almost everything we do: from predicting what your opponents will do in a football match, to understanding which products customers will most likely pick from the shelves. Psychologists have uncovered many ways to study human behaviour...

  

 Introspection method – The introspection method is when an individual explains their feelings and experiences to another person. The person receiving the information will be able to get a better understanding through what they're told, rather than through what they can simply observe.

  

 Observation method – This method uses the researcher's observational skills to gain information about another person. This is better performed in a natural environment when the participant doesn't, necessarily, know they are being observed at that particular point – this makes their behaviour more natural.

  

 Experimental method – The experimental method will, often, be performed in a lab under controlled conditions and will be used to measure the effect that one variable has on another. For example, whether listening to certain music increases or decrease heart rate.

  

 Clinical method – Most commonly used in hospitals, the clinical method is when the information about an individual can be gathered from other sources, such as other people or medical records.

  

 Survey method – This method is used to gather information from large groups via surveys and questionnaires. It is best used to quickly gather large amounts of information and can be gathered from further afield.

  

 Genetic method – The genetic method allows researchers to understand an individual's behaviour through past experiences; especially from childhood.
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					MINDSPACE behaviour change
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				<description>
					
 Mindspace behaviour change is a framework that can be used to help people decide if they want to commit to behaviour modification. It comes under behavioural science as it is the first step in understanding a change in behaviour. The 'MINDSPACE' anagram is used in many different scenarios as a way to either change or enforce behaviours. The letters of 'MINDSPACE' stand for: messenger, incentives, norms, defaults, silence, priming, affects, commitment and ego.

  

 Messenger – A behaviour modification is more likely to occur if the information about the change is being told by someone we trust. For example, you're more likely to listen to a close friend that you trust over someone you haven't met before.

  

 Incentives – What we get out of the change or what we avoid. Research has shown that avoiding a loss or negative outcome is more incentivising than a reward.

  

 Norms – People will act based on what they see others do around them. If they regularly encounter a certain behaviour, they are more likely to adopt that behaviour than one they don't see as regularly.

  

 Defaults – Everyone has their own behaviour and changing that will prove to be a challenge. To begin changing behaviour you must first try to block out the behaviour that you're trying to lose.

  

 Silence – Trying to relate certain messages to yourself to make them seem more relevant. If something is irrelevant, then it can appear as if it's not actually there.

  

 Priming – Surrounding yourself with images, sounds, and smells that promote the new behaviour. Some people may feel relaxed by certain sounds and agitated by others.

  

 Affects – Creating a positive mood will, most likely, encourage you to behave in a more positive way. Common behaviours that people try to avoid, such as smoking or excessive eating, are most common when the environment isn't right.

  

 Commitment – How willing the individual is to make behaviour modifications. It has been proven that making new goals public will make you more committed.

  

 Ego – People act in a way that they wish to be seen. The ones who want to be viewed as healthy will likely exercise and eat well; whereas those who want to be seen as boisterous will likely act so.
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					Consumer Behaviour Market Research
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 Consumer behaviour market research is a type of research that studies how customers behave and what makes them choose certain products and falls under the broad category of behavioural science. This data can help the company know how to package and sell their products in order to make new customers and keep existing ones. There are many ways the behaviour of the consumer can be observed, including: face-to-face interviews, email surveys and direct observation. It is also an effective way of knowing what the company's competitors are doing better in the eyes of the consumer.

  

 A big part of consumer behaviour is system 1 and 2 thinking – how we make decisions. System 1 is initial thoughts and is how we make most of our decisions. System 2 is when we make a decision based on more in-depth facts. For example, if a customer is deciding which packet of cereal to buy, they will most likely make their decision on the packaging (system 1), however, they could make their decision based on ingredients or calories (system 2).

  

 A further important factor to understand consumer behaviour is a company's brand equity. Good relations between a company and their customers will create a positive brand equity and increase sales over their competitors. A negative brand equity, commonly instigated by poor products or customer services, will change the consumer behaviour.
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					Behavioural Economics Research
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 Behavioural economics is a research method often used by psychologists to study people's decision making, and comes under the category of behavioural science. It is performed in research studies to better understand a customer's reasoning behind their responses by making sense of their subconscious decisions. Market researchers are using behavioural economics more and more because of its effectiveness at limiting bias and its ability to allow the researchers to greater understand the reasons behind the consumer's decisions.

  

 The psychologist Daniel Kahneman explains two modes describing the way humans think: system 1 (fast mode) and system 2 (slow mode). 'Fast mode' is used in situations such as simple Maths and is how researchers want participants to make decisions. Researchers keep participants in system 1 by applying time pressure as to ensure they do not become too logical in their thinking. System 2, however, is the more rational way of thinking and allows for the consumer to deliberate all the details to make a more informative decision. 

  

 It is thought that over 80% of decisions are made in 'fast mode' as it's an unconscious, initial response to a situation – it is how a consumer first decides if they like a product or not and is the mode that branding and marketing primarily appeals to. Fast mode also explains how people are able to complete their shopping in a few minutes or hours, while being faced with thousands of different options.
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					Statistical Analysis
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 Statistical analysis is the process a researcher goes through to uncover patterns and trends within data. The researcher may also choose to use a computer programme to assist in sorting through the data, so a more complex analysis can be performed. Statistical analysis is used as it is a quantitative way to help eliminate bias from a research study. The patterns that statistical analysis uncover can help predict future trends in an industry to help a company stay ahead of the competition. When conducting statistical analysis, many researchers will put the data into graphs or tables as it makes the patterns easier to view. When done correctly, they will show how each data point correlates with the other data points.

  

 Statistical analysis is used in all industries to view progression and to predict future trends. One of the most important is in the health industry and its use of medication. When new medicines are first introduced, statistical analysis is used in order to find out the effect it has on the body and whether the medicine is reacting in the way it is supposed to. For example, a new drug is used to cure a disease, however many people who have taken the medicine experience headaches and breathing difficulties. When statistical analysis is performed, it may be found that all the people with these side effects have asthma, and the medicine is reacting with it.
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					Standard Deviation
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 Standard deviation is used in analysing statistics and is a measure of the variation from the data set to the mean – the bigger the variation, the higher the standard deviation. When conducting a research study, a low variation is ideal because it indicates a low range in the data set and that all the points of data are similar. A higher deviation suggests a less reliable research study because the data points are more spread out. 

  

 When presenting research findings after the study is completed, researchers will often use the mean to show the results as it is easier to understand. However, the mean can be misleading as a whole set of data is represented as a single figure. When a set of data is presented as a mean or average, standard deviation should also be used to add more information. For example, if eight friends shared a pizza with eight slices, the mean number of slices each person gets will be one. However, the standard deviation is one slice, meaning someone didn't get a slice and someone else got two. The use of standard deviation changes the statistic, even though it is actually the same. Presenting the standard deviation, alongside the mean, will give more information and be just as simple to understand.
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					Statistical Significance
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 Statistical significance is used by market researchers to ensure their findings have not occurred by chance, and are reliable. For a research finding to be statistically significant, the researcher must show it is at least 95% probable, allowing for an error margin of 5%; this means that if the study was repeated 100 times, a minimum of 95 test results would be the same. In market research, it is highly unlikely that a research study will include all of a target population or be without bias, which makes statistical significance important in demonstrating the reliability of the findings.

  

 To calculate the statistical significance of a finding, the researcher will conduct either a T-test or a Z-test. A T-test assesses whether the findings were a result of chance by checking if two independent groups have the same mean. A Z-test checks the significance of a finding by checking if two independent groups have an equal population proportion. If the tests prove that the mean or proportion are equal, the findings will not be statistically significant.

  

 An important factor that could prevent a finding from being statistically significant is sampling error. Sampling error is when the participants selected for a research study are not representative of the whole target population. In this case, the results will not reflect the whole population correctly, meaning there is no statistical significance.
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					Recruitment Screener
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 A recruitment screener is a series of qualifying questions used by market researchers to identify if the selection of participants accurately reflects the target population. They are also used to assess if a candidate fits the criteria for a particular research study. While most of the questions will be closed questions to illicit specific answers from the participant, the recruitment screener should also include some open questions as to help better understand the candidate.

  

 To save time, screeners will be conducted over the phone or online; therefore, if the participant isn't selected, they haven't had to travel anywhere. Most recruitment screeners will find out the occupation of the participant as they could work for the company being researched or for a market research company themselves, meaning their answers may be biased. Furthermore, eliciting the participant's age, along with where they work and live are often key points when conducting market research. Setting parameters for the study will help eliminate possible candidates to ensure the selection of participants reflects the target population accurately. Once the candidates have all been given the recruitment screener, the market researchers will select the participants who they think will make up the most accurate representation of the target population, or who they think will be most insightful. 

  

 Recruitment screeners are useful in making a research study more valid and tailored better for the individual study. 
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					Multi-Modal Research
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 Multi-modal research is a type of market research where the respondent is asked to comment on a product using the five senses – smell, sight, sound, taste and touch. This methodology is most used in industries such as food and drink or music, as the business is oriented toward a specific sense. 

  

 Although these industries can be solely associated with one sense, a collection of the other senses can be used to assess and form an opinion about the product. For example, in the food industry, a meal would have to taste good but also look and smell appetising with a texture the customer likes. Multi-modal research would allow the participant to express their feelings for the brand using all the senses available to them.

  

 Multi-modal research can also be used to describe research where different methodologies are used; such as focus groups or an online community. It can be an effective way at saving time and money as you can do a lot of the research and get to know the participants online within an online community. An in-depth observation can then be made during a focus group when the researcher knows a little bit about the participants. 

  

 Performing online market research prior to the actual study could also be insightful for the researcher as to who they choose to observe in a real-life setting. For example, if the participants were asked to give their views on a beef burger, a participant who knows a lot about fast food would likely give a more insightful opinion.
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					Mann-Whitney U Test
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 The Mann-Whitney U test is a nonparametric version of the T-test, used to assess a null hypothesis; stating that all outcomes have an equal chance of being greater or lower than the other. The first idea of such a test was in 1914, however it wasn't fully completed at this time. In 1945, Frank Wilcoxon proposed a more in-depth view however, it was still missing some key points. A few years after in 1947, Henry Mann and his student Donald Whitney conducted a full analysis and created what is now known as the Mann-Whitney U test.

  

 A common way to conduct a Mann-Whitney U test is to first decide on a null and alternative hypothesis; for example, 'There will be no difference between the speed of a dog and the speed of a cat', 'There will be a difference between the speed of a dog and the speed of a cat'. To test these hypotheses, a test using six cats and six dogs will take place, where each animal will race the same distance on the same track. The times of all 12 animals are recorded and each animal will be given a score based off how many of the other animal they beat. The results could be in this order: C, C, D, C, D, D, D, C, D, D, C, C with 'C' being cat and 'D' being dog. The cats' scores were: 6, 6, 5, 2, 0, 0; with the dogs' scores being 4, 3, 3, 3, 2, 2. The next stage is to add up all the scores for each animal (cat – 6+6+5+2+0+0=19) (dog – 4+3+3+3+2+2=17). This study shows that, although not much, there is a difference between the speed of a dog and the speed of a cat.
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					Choice Modelling Market Research
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 Choice modelling is used in market research to create a scenario where consumers purchase products, in order to observe their decisions. When purchasing products, individuals will unconsciously select certain brands over others without knowing the full reason why; choice modelling aims to uncover these reasons. Often, things such as: packaging, media advertisement and promotional offers will affect which brand the customer buys. Using this information, companies can vary their marketing to best suite their target market and stay ahead of their competition.

  

 Understanding customer opinion of products or services is essential to any business, and sometimes, just performing the study is enough to get new customers. Performing choice modelling market research can show some consumers that the company cares about their opinions. Furthermore, quickly acting on the findings from the study can show just how much the brand values its customers.

  

 Choice modelling market research can also provide relevant information regarding data such as age and gender. On some research studies, the respondent will be asked to state either their age, gender or both. Based on this data, patterns may appear regarding what different generations look for when purchasing specific products. It may also be revealed that the company's originally planned target market might be wrong, and it's found that more people from outside the target market are interested in the product.
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					Applied Market Research
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 Applied market research is a specific type of market research, used to find answers to questions that have a direct impact on practical scenarios. For example, applied research would be used in the medical industry to uncover the healing properties of certain foods or medicines and to ascertain if it could be used practically. Unlike many other studies, an applied research study will often create the solutions for the problem, making it effective when used properly and in the correct situation.

  

 Alongside applied, there are many other types of market research, one of the more common ones being basic research. Basic research is used to increase the understanding individuals have on the topic, instead of finding solutions for it. For example, basic research would study the side effects of a specific medicine or food, instead of whether it could be used to treat people. Applied research is often used in a follow up study to a basic research study, because the increased knowledge that basic research uncovers can illicit problems that applied research could be able to solve.

  

 Applied research uses quantitative data and scientific evidence to find solutions for problems; which creates little chance for bias in the study as all the data has previously been checked. Often, the quantitative data used will have been found by a basic study into the same subject.
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					Usability Testing
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 Usability testing is used in a range of industries and involves allowing a customer to use a product, and then analysing their thoughts and how it performed. The test helps identify issues with a product before being put on sale, but also shows what works well. In market research, it isn't much different; the researcher gives a representative user the product and allows them to test it with some feedback. The feedback provided by the participant can also act as leverage to create a better marketing campaign.

  

 Having a researcher with good observational skills is important when conducting usability testing because they will need to be able to observe the participant closely. Sometimes what the participant does or how they act is different to how the product developers intended; which could lead to misuse of the product and make the product less profitable. In some circumstances, this could create a negative perception about the brand or company behind it.

  

 Often, during usability testing, participants will be asked to solve a problem (or something similar) with the product, then to say aloud what they think they're doing. This allows the researcher to observe differences in how the participant thought the product would work, what they are doing and what they think they are doing. This then allows the researcher to better understand how customers could misuse the product once it has been released.
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					Market Research Moderator
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 A market research moderator is responsible for ensuring the discussion in a focus group runs smoothly. They are also responsible for introducing new and relevant topics to the discussion to ensure the requirements of the research study are met. During the study, the moderator has to remain neutral as to not alter the opinions of the participants.

  

 Good market research moderators take note of verbal answers as well as being aware of the non-verbal signals the respondents give, meaning they must have good listening and awareness skills. Furthermore, the moderator must be trusted by the researcher, as to ensure the research study is as reliable as possible. Some moderators also find it useful to prepare what they are going to say to the participants, especially when they first meet, in order to allow the participants to have trust in the study.

  

 Often, when performing group-based studies, the participants aren't completely in the know about what the study is actually testing; therefore, they might give answers that bear no relevance, or little relevance to the study. It is then the moderator's job to move the conversation back to the correct topics, without revealing the full purpose of the research study. The moderator could also ask questions that have little impact on the findings as to enclose the full purpose of the study.
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					GANTT Chart for Market Research
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 A GANTT chart is a horizontal bar chart used to show key dates in a project including the start and finish. In market research, it is used to plan a project effectively, to help reduce stress and to help the project be more time efficient. A well-made GANTT chart will show which tasks can be done in parallel with each other, and which have to follow a specific timeline to complete in order. It can also show which parts of a project are a main priority and which can be delayed a short time.

  

 To make an effective GANTT chart, the first action is to list the objectives and goals of the project so the tasks in the chart are all directed towards the main aim of the study. Next, realistic dates should be set out – not too short to ensure the project is completed, but not too long to make sure it is performed in the most time efficient way. Once the goals and timings have been decided, the tasks must be listed so the team can do their work in parallel to others and separately. Furthermore, the tasks should be assigned to specific people to ensure no confusion about who is doing what. Finally, the project can begin; however, the progress of each task must be monitored and evaluated regularly to make sure the project being completed at the desired pace and finished on time.
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					Statistical Margin of Error
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 A statistical margin of error is used to express the amount of random sampling error in a research survey. Researchers will aim for a smaller margin of error as to increase the validity of their study and show they have sampled a good representation of the target population. Every research study will have a statistical margin of error, unless the study tests the whole of a target population.

  

 The margin of error in statistics also relates to the confidence interval of a research study. The confidence interval is an estimate that the whole target population will fall between a certain range of data. They measure the degree of uncertainty in a sample population and will often estimate between 95% and 99% confidence – when a greater number of participants are observed, the percentage of confidence increases, therefore the confidence interval decreases. The statistical margin of error is equal to half of the confidence interval, meaning that when more people are tested, the margin of error decreases, leading to a more valid study.

  

 If a survey is published without a margin of error specified, it could be viewed as incomplete. For example, if a research study stated that 29% of adults have cereal before work with an error margin of 4%, the data should be interpreted to be 25-33% of adults have cereal before work. Without the statistical margin of error, the data changes significantly and wouldn't be an accurate representation of the whole target population.
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					Probability Sampling
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 Probability sampling is a sampling method where all the participants, knowingly, have an equal chance at being selected based on probability. When a larger population is involved in a research study, it is not time or cost effective to observe everyone, so only a few are chosen. Probability sampling is used on the assumption that random selection would create an accurate representation of the whole target population.

  

 There are four types of probability sampling: simple random sampling, stratified random sampling, random cluster sampling and systematic sampling. Simple random sampling involves the researcher assigning each participant with a number, then using an automated, random number selector to decide which participants are chosen.

  

 The second type of probability sampling is stratified random sampling. Stratified random sampling involves the researcher putting each participant into smaller sub-groups that represent everyone in the target population. The sub-groups will not noticeably overlap and everyone in each group has an equal chance at being selected.

  

 Another method is random cluster sampling, which involves selecting participants randomly via geographical location. For example, to research people's views about the UK government, the researcher would take samples from various locations around the UK to gain a better oversight of the whole target population.

  

 The final method of probability sampling, systematic sampling, is when the researcher selects every nth person to be observed; for example, every 3rd person. This provides an equal chance of selection for all participants.
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				<title>
					77% of UK SMEs either do not have or are unsure of their strategies to decrease their carbon emissions, survey reveals
				</title>
				<description>
					
 
  77% of UK SMEs either do not have or are unsure of their strategies to decrease their carbon emissions: A survey into business leaders' favoured approaches to reducing their carbon emissions has found that almost eight in 10 are not aware of or do not have a strategy. Furthermore, around half of those surveyed said they didn't know what the term 'net-zero' meant.
 
   
 
  The study, by YouGov for Lloyds Bank, polled of over 1,000 SME businesses in the UK at the start of 2022 and aimed to illicit their approaches to reducing carbon emissions and net-zero. The survey found that just over three-quarters (76%) do not have comprehensive strategies to tackling the issue – with many stating they lacked the in-house capabilities and funds to put in place such strategies.
 
   
 
  When asked about whether they knew about their own carbon footprint, just 12% said they had calculated their carbon footprint. In addition, a third said their lack of knowledge meant they could not gain a better understanding of the problem, with a quarter saying they didn't have the funds or the time to improve their knowledge.
 
   
 
  The issue of how to reduce carbon emissions is further exemplified with over 75% of participants saying they do not have ambitious enough targets to reach net-zero. Many stated a lack of finance, time, and understanding as the main reasons for not having an ambitious enough target.
 
   
 
  In addition, there are over five and a half million SMEs in the UK, meaning over four million SMEs not have net-zero targets which are not challenging enough.
 
   
 
  Adam Rainey, commercial director of business banking for Lloyds Bank, said: "While our nation's small businesses recognise the importance of tackling climate change, there are real issues with understanding how to get there – including calculating carbon emissions and even the meaning of net-zero. Fortunately, there's a whole host of support available to help businesses make their first steps in becoming greener."

				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/77percent-of-UK-SMEs-either-do-not-have-or-are-unsure-of-their-strategies-to-decrease-their-carbon-emissions-survey-reveals-05135
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/77percent-of-UK-SMEs-either-do-not-have-or-are-unsure-of-their-strategies-to-decrease-their-carbon-emissions-survey-reveals-05135
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				<title>
					72% of business leaders say their companies have started to use mobile technology and cloud, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 72% of business leaders say their companies have started to use mobile technology and cloud: A recent study into which technologies are most prominently used by businesses has found that 72% have adopted mobile technology and cloud. Furthermore, almost half (48%) are using IoT (Internet of Things); the third most used technology, according to the polling.

  

 The study by BluQube polled UK business leaders and uncovered the most used technologies in UK business. The survey also found that just 13% of business leaders use robotics and interoperable systems.

  

 When looking at the reasons behind using new types of technology, 65% cited 'improved efficiency' as a key factor; with 44% saying it 'saved them money. In addition, 39% said the move to a more digital way of working helped with their customers' experience.

  

 There have been some big changes in the type and amount of technology used, according to the research, with 76% saying they sped up digital development due to the pandemic. Furthermore, 36% of business leaders said that the introduction of new technologies has helped with remote or hybrid working.

  

 Improved sustainability was cited as a key benefit by 36% of business leaders, with 32% saying improved transparency is a main factor in adopting a more digital way of working. In addition, 27% of business leaders found their employee engagement increased when using more technologies.

  

 Augmented reality is a relatively new technology, however, more than a fifth (21%) of business leaders said they have started to use it in their business. Furthermore, artificial intelligence and machine learning have seen an increase in use, with three in 10 saying they are now using the technologies.

  

 Simon Kearsley, Chief Executive of BluQube, said: "By using the right innovative technologies to automate and streamline time-consuming, repetitive tasks, businesses can unlock the true potential of their staff, and free up team time and headspace to focus on the more strategic tasks."
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/72percent-of-business-leaders-say-their-companies-have-started-to-use-mobile-technology-and-cloud-reveals-survey-05134
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/72percent-of-business-leaders-say-their-companies-have-started-to-use-mobile-technology-and-cloud-reveals-survey-05134
				</guid>
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				<title>
					Two-thirds of primary school teachers feel confident in supporting children with LGBT+ matters, survey reveals
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Two-thirds of primary school teachers feel confident in supporting children with LGBT+ matters: A recent study has uncovered that 66% of primary school teachers feel they can help their students with LGBT+ matters, leaving a third unconfident in supporting children in this area.

  

 The survey by TeacherTapp polled just under 7,000 teachers in both primary and secondary schools about Pride activities during Pride month in June 2022. The study found that three in 10 primary school teachers had heard students offer support or kind words to their LGBT+ friends, with 6% having heard of such behaviour through colleagues.

  

 When asked about what Pride events had happened in their school, 15% of primary school teachers said they had done something to celebrate Pride month or educate their students about the LGBT+ community; an increase of 3% from 2021 and 12% from 2019.

  

 Secondary schools appear to place Pride events higher on their agenda, with 56% of teachers saying their school is doing something for Pride month; a 6% increase from 2021 and a 38% increase from 2018. In addition, eight in 10 secondary school staff report being confident in their ability to help LGBT+ matters amongst their students.

  

 The most commonly cited form of Pride activity in secondary schools was talking about the subject in lessons (42%), found the survey, with running assemblies dedicated the Pride month (34%) also being common. In addition, 5% of secondary school teachers say their school has participated in wider community events, such as a Pride march.

  

 Furthermore, seven in 10 secondary school teachers report hearing kind words being said from students to their LGBT+ friends. On the other hand, secondary school teachers are almost twice as likely to hear students use derogatory terms related to gender identity or sexuality as primary school teachers. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Two-thirds-of-primary-school-teachers-feel-confident-in-supporting-children-with-LGBT-matters-survey-reveals-05133
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Two-thirds-of-primary-school-teachers-feel-confident-in-supporting-children-with-LGBT-matters-survey-reveals-05133
				</guid>
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				<title>
					55% UK adults approve of the decisions made by Boris Johnson when it comes to the Ukraine crisis, finds poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 55% UK adults approve of the decisions made by Boris Johnson when it comes to the Ukraine crisis: A survey of 8,000 UK adults has revealed that more than half (55%) approve of the decisions made by Boris Johnson over Ukraine, with a quarter disapproving.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/55percent-UK-adults-approve-of-the-decisions-made-by-Boris-Johnson-when-it-comes-to-the-Ukraine-crisis-finds-poll-05132
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/55percent-UK-adults-approve-of-the-decisions-made-by-Boris-Johnson-when-it-comes-to-the-Ukraine-crisis-finds-poll-05132
				</guid>
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				<title>
					More than 8 in 10 automotive bosses say that since Covid they have struggled to fill vacancies for skilled workers, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 More than 8 in 10 automotive bosses say that since Covid they have struggled to fill vacancies for skilled workers: A survey has revealed more about the skills shortage within the automotive industry; reportedly the industry sector with the UK's sixth highest vacancy rate. It revealed that more than eight in 10 automotive bosses have found it increasingly more challenging to fill vacancies for skilled roles since start of the Covid-19 pandemic.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/More-than-8-in-10-automotive-bosses-say-that-since-Covid-they-have-struggled-to-fill-vacancies-for-skilled-workers-reveals-survey-05131
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/More-than-8-in-10-automotive-bosses-say-that-since-Covid-they-have-struggled-to-fill-vacancies-for-skilled-workers-reveals-survey-05131
				</guid>
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				<title>
					Survey reveals that 72% of MPs' staff find their job 'emotionally draining'
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey reveals that 72% of MPs' staff find their job 'emotionally draining': A survey of MPs' staff, the first of its kind, has found that 72.2% of parliamentary aides found their role 'emotionally draining', with a further 64.4% saying their role was 'difficult'.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-that-72percent-of-MPs-staff-find-their-job-emotionally-draining-05126
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-that-72percent-of-MPs-staff-find-their-job-emotionally-draining-05126
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					87% of councillors are in support of moving to hybrid model of online and in-person council meetings, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 87% of councillors are in support of moving to hybrid model of online and in-person council meetings: A survey of councillors has revealed that the majority are in favour of moving council meetings to a mix of online and in-person sessions, with 72% saying that they believe this move could help to attract younger people, women and ethnic minorities to stand in local elections.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/87percent-of-councillors-are-in-support-of-moving-to-hybrid-model-of-online-and-in-person-council-meetings-finds-survey-05127
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/87percent-of-councillors-are-in-support-of-moving-to-hybrid-model-of-online-and-in-person-council-meetings-finds-survey-05127
				</guid>
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				<title>
					47% of local council executives confident in meeting net zero targets, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 47% of local council executives confident in meeting net zero targets: A survey of councils around the UK has found that just 47% have confidence that they will meet their self-imposed net zero targets. This is despite 87% of those polled saying they are working to a deadline to bring their operations in line with net zero.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/47percent-of-local-council-executives-confident-in-meeting-net-zero-targets-finds-survey-05129
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/47percent-of-local-council-executives-confident-in-meeting-net-zero-targets-finds-survey-05129
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Two-fifths of adults own and use a voice-activated personal assistant or smart speaker device, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Two-fifths of adults own and use a voice-activated personal assistant or smart speaker device: A survey of households in England has found that two-fifths (39%) of adults own and use a voice-activated personal assistant or smart speaker device. It also revealed details about other technology owned and used by people livzwnj;ing in England.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Two-fifths-of-adults-own-and-use-a-voice-activated-personal-assistant-or-smart-speaker-device-finds-survey-05114
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Two-fifths-of-adults-own-and-use-a-voice-activated-personal-assistant-or-smart-speaker-device-finds-survey-05114
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Seven out of 10 IT employers are finding it difficult to recruit staff with adequate digital skills, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Seven out of 10 IT employers are finding it difficult to recruit staff with adequate digital skills: A survey of IT employers has found that 69% are finding it difficult to recruit staff with adequate digital skills, with more than three-quarters (77%) stating that their company is facing a digital skills gap.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Seven-out-of-10-IT-employers-are-finding-it-difficult-to-recruit-staff-with-adequate-digital-skills-finds-survey-05130
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Seven-out-of-10-IT-employers-are-finding-it-difficult-to-recruit-staff-with-adequate-digital-skills-finds-survey-05130
				</guid>
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			<item>
				<title>
					46% of logistic and coach businesses are satisfied with England's motorways and major roads, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 46% of logistic and coach businesses are satisfied with England's motorways and major roads: A satisfaction survey by Transport Focus of logistics and coach businesses has found that fewer than half (46%) are satisfied with England's motorways and major 'A' roads when it comes to meeting their business needs, with just 4% saying they were 'very satisfied'.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/46percent-of-logistic-and-coach-businesses-are-satisfied-with-Englands-motorways-and-major-roads-finds-survey-05128
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/46percent-of-logistic-and-coach-businesses-are-satisfied-with-Englands-motorways-and-major-roads-finds-survey-05128
				</guid>
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			<item>
				<title>
					7 out of 10 Brits believe the UK should stop using Russia's oil and gas
				</title>
				<description>
					
 7 out of 10 Brits believe the UK should stop using Russia's oil and gas: A survey of UK adults has revealed that nearly 7 in 10 (69%) believe that continuing to use oil and gas from Russia is unacceptable and should be stopped -- even if it makes energy bills in the UK more costly. This is due to the Russian invasion of Ukraine, which began in February earlier this year.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/7-out-of-10-Brits-believe-the-UK-should-stop-using-Russias-oil-and-gas-05124
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/7-out-of-10-Brits-believe-the-UK-should-stop-using-Russias-oil-and-gas-05124
				</guid>
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			<item>
				<title>
					Six in 10 Americans would support exporting large quantities of natural gas to Europe, according to survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Six in 10 Americans would support exporting large quantities of natural gas to Europe: A survey of U.S. adults has found that 61% would be in favour of exporting large amounts of natural gas to Europe in response to many European countries announcing plans to reduce or phase out Russian imports. However, 37% were opposed to it. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Six-in-10-Americans-would-support-exporting-large-quantities-of-natural-gas-to-Europe-according-to-survey-05123
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Six-in-10-Americans-would-support-exporting-large-quantities-of-natural-gas-to-Europe-according-to-survey-05123
				</guid>
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			<item>
				<title>
					42% of Brits have an unused internet router in their homes; leaving around 22 million redundant ISP routers in the UK, survey reveals
				</title>
				<description>
					
 42% of Brits have an unused internet router in their homes; leaving around 22 million redundant ISP routers in the UK: A recent survey, into how companies and the British public can use routers better, has revealed that four in 10 (42%) have an internet router that they no longer use, with experts estimating there are 22 million redundant ISP routers in UK homes.

  

 Furthermore, 14% of those surveyed said they have multiple unused routers in the home.

  

 When asked about why they have so many routers in their house, 59% said they didn't know how to recycle their old router, with a further 15% saying they have a second router sent to them by their internet service provider, alongside their older, working router.

  

 The study by Uswitch polled 2,000 UK adults in October 2021 to find out if there is a more preferable way for Brits to get internet into their homes. The research uncovered that three-quarters of British adults want a universal router that can be used by any internet service provider; in order to reduce the amount of e-waste.

  

 Six in 10 consumers believe bigger companies can do more to help save the planet, with Sky Broadband being voted as being the poorest when it comes to helping customers recycle their old routers.

  

 One of the reasons for so many redundant internet routers could be the desire to have the best connection possible. The advancements in technology allow for better internet routers to be made, meaning there are many older routers not in use.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/42percent-of-Brits-have-an-unused-internet-router-in-their-homes-leaving-around-22-million-redundant-ISP-routers-in-the-UK-survey-reveals-05100
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/42percent-of-Brits-have-an-unused-internet-router-in-their-homes-leaving-around-22-million-redundant-ISP-routers-in-the-UK-survey-reveals-05100
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				<title>
					Premier Inn ranks top hotel chain in Britain, with an average customer score of 79%, survey reveals
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Premier Inn ranks top hotel chain in Britain, with an average customer score of 79%: A recent survey of the hospitality industry has revealed that when it comes to satisfaction, customers gave Premier Inn an average score of 79%, making the company the most popular big hotel chain in the UK.

  

 The study by Which? polled over 2,300 members of the public from July 2020 to October 2021, and asked them to rank the hotels in many areas, including bathrooms, cleanliness, and value for money. The survey also looked at a range of hotel chains, with 24 large and 6 small chains being observed.

  

 Although Premier Inn was ranked as the best hotel chain, the smaller chain, Hotel du Vin, achieved an average customer score of 80%; with both hotels costing an average of £150 for a one-night stay. 

  

 For the ninth year in a row, Britannia Hotels ranked as the worst hotel chain in the UK with an average customer satisfaction score of 49%. Furthermore, four in 10 of those surveyed had visited a Britannia hotel with 51% saying they had encountered an issue during their stay; cleanliness being the most common problem.

  

 Mercure hotels were ranked just above Britannia with an average customer rating of 52%. However, like Britannia, they received a two-star rating for cleanliness alongside bathrooms, communal areas and value for money.

  

 Rory Boland, travel editor for Which? said: "The impressive, budget-friendly Premier Inn is our pick of the large chains, and Hotel du Vin offers high quality stays in interesting locations."
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Premier-Inn-ranks-top-hotel-chain-in-Britain-with-an-average-customer-score-of-79percent-survey-reveals-05056
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Premier-Inn-ranks-top-hotel-chain-in-Britain-with-an-average-customer-score-of-79percent-survey-reveals-05056
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				<title>
					Cutting back on holidays was top answer given by UK parents who are trying to adjust to rising cost of living, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Cutting back on holidays was top answer given by UK parents who are trying to adjust to rising cost of living: A survey of UK parents has shed light on the ways people are trying to navigate the cost of living crisis, with forsaking a family holiday this year the number one answer given.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Cutting-back-on-holidays-was-top-answer-given-by-UK-parents-who-are-trying-to-adjust-to-rising-cost-of-living-according-to-poll-05077
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Cutting-back-on-holidays-was-top-answer-given-by-UK-parents-who-are-trying-to-adjust-to-rising-cost-of-living-according-to-poll-05077
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				<title>
					42% of homeowners leave doors and windows unlocked when they are at home, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 42% of homeowners leave doors and windows unlocked when they are at home:A survey has revealed than more than two-fifths of homeowners leave doors and windows unlocked when they are at home – this is despite figures showing that most burglaries (58%) happen when there are people inside their homes. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/42percent-of-homeowners-leave-doors-and-windows-unlocked-when-they-are-at-home-finds-survey-05099
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/42percent-of-homeowners-leave-doors-and-windows-unlocked-when-they-are-at-home-finds-survey-05099
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				<title>
					Half of social landlords are concerned 'to a large extent' about the impact of rising energy costs on their organisation, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Half of social landlords are concerned 'to a large extent' about the impact of rising energy costs on their organisation: A survey of social landlords has revealed the extent to which they are concerned about the rising cost of living and the impact on their organisation, with half of those polled revealing they are concerned 'to a large extent'. In addition, more than a third of respondents (36%) said they are concerned 'to some extent', while 10% answered 'to a limited extent'. Just 3.8% of respondents said they were concerned 'to a very limited extent'. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Half-of-social-landlords-are-concerned-to-a-large-extent-about-the-impact-of-rising-energy-costs-on-their-organisation-reveals-survey-05119
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Half-of-social-landlords-are-concerned-to-a-large-extent-about-the-impact-of-rising-energy-costs-on-their-organisation-reveals-survey-05119
				</guid>
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				<title>
					8% of NHS workers have experienced discrimination from patients, relatives or other members of the public while at work, survey reveals
				</title>
				<description>
					
 8% of NHS workers have experienced discrimination from patients, relatives or members of the public while at work: The 2021 National NHS Staff Survey has uncovered that that just under 8% of the NHS staff members polled experienced discrimination in the workplace over the last 12 months; with this figure rising to 19% for 'BAME' (Black, Asian and minority ethnic) staff. Both are increases on the survey performed in 2020.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/8percent-of-NHS-workers-have-experienced-discrimination-from-patients-relatives-or-other-members-of-the-public-while-at-work-survey-reveals-05097
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/8percent-of-NHS-workers-have-experienced-discrimination-from-patients-relatives-or-other-members-of-the-public-while-at-work-survey-reveals-05097
				</guid>
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				<title>
					One in eight  trainee GPs are not planning a career in general practice, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 One in eight trainee GPs are not planning a career in general practice: A survey of trainee GPs has revealed that one in 8 (13%) are not planning to pursue a career in general practice when they qualify.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/One-in-eight-trainee-GPs-are-not-planning-a-career-in-general-practice-finds-survey-05105
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/One-in-eight-trainee-GPs-are-not-planning-a-career-in-general-practice-finds-survey-05105
				</guid>
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	</rss>