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				<title>
					We are proud to continue our support of the Market Research Benevolent Association
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				<description>
					
	
		Our company is a proud member of the Market Research Benevolent Association (MRBA) – the market research industry's independent, registered charity, and we are thrilled to be in a position to continue supporting the charity as a sponsor in 2021. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-proud-to-continue-our-support-of-the-Market-Research-Benevolent-Association
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-proud-to-continue-our-support-of-the-Market-Research-Benevolent-Association
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				<title>
					40 more years of loyalty from DJS staff!
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				<description>
					
	
		
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/40-more-years-of-loyalty-from-DJS-staff
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				<title>
					Join our growing team! Four exciting new job opportunities at DJS Research
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Join-our-growing-team-Four-exciting-new-job-opportunities-at-DJS-Research
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Join-our-growing-team-Four-exciting-new-job-opportunities-at-DJS-Research
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					2205 miles covered for our Get up and Go Challenge 2021!
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/2205-miles-covered-for-our-Get-up-and-Go-Challenge-2021
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/2205-miles-covered-for-our-Get-up-and-Go-Challenge-2021
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					We have been selected for the Network Rail Insight Framework!
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				<description>
					
	
		Following a multi-stage tendering process, we are delighted to announce that DJS Research has been awarded a contract to provide Network Rail with market research services. 
	
		 
	
		We will undertake market research for Network Rail in two lots: Quantitative and Qualitative Primary Market Research and Commercial Market Intelligence, including a range of services:
	
		 
	
		bull; B2C/B2B/CX 
	
		bull; Employee engagement 
	
		bull; Comms development  evaluation 
	
		bull; Brand reputation 
	
		bull; Stakeholder engagement including journalists and politicians
	
		bull; Mystery shopping 
	
		bull; Pedestrian counting 
	
		bull; Behaviour change 
	
		bull; Segmentation 
	
		bull; Public health and safety 
	
		 
	
		Network Rail owns, operates and develops Britain's railway infrastructure, managing 20 of the UK's largest stations and responsible for 20,000 miles of track. It has a vision to put its passengers and freight users first and be a company that people are proud to work for. Now working within a new structure, it is committed to being more responsive to train operators, passengers and freight users.
	
		 
	
		Elliot Simmonds, Research Director at DJS Research, said of the successful framework bid:
	
		 
	
		"Being one of only a handful of agencies appointed to Network Rail's insight framework for the coming years is a testament to our continued desire to work with clients who are leading the way in innovation and meeting the challenges of the future head on. Network Rail's vision of putting passengers first is something that chimed immediately with us at DJS, and it is a vision we are looking forward to working with them towards. We're very proud to be on this journey with them."
	
		 
	
		This is the most recent in a number of framework successes including WRAP and Cadent. 
	
		 


	Get more DJS News: 

	2021 off to a great start as we welcome eight new staff!

	 

	40 more decades of loyalty from DJS staff!

	 

	Reframing project management – a person centred approach.

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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-have-been-selected-for-the-Network-Rail-Insight-Framework
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-have-been-selected-for-the-Network-Rail-Insight-Framework
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				<title>
					2021 off to a great start as we welcome eight new staff!
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				<description>
					
	
		
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/2021-off-to-a-great-start-as-we-welcome-eight-new-staff
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/2021-off-to-a-great-start-as-we-welcome-eight-new-staff
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					Reframing project management – a person centred approach.
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				<description>
					
	
		
	
		But what do you actually do?
	
		At this point in a normal year, you'd find me steeling myself for a season of awkward gatherings. Smiling patiently while distant and aged relatives perform their annual interrogation:
				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Reframing-project-management-a-person-centred-approach
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					Jack went to Poland: What I did with my DJS volunteering day...
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				<description>
					
	

	 

	 

	 

	 

	 

	 

	 

	 

	Written by Jack Watson, Research Manager

	 

	For nine months in 2016, I lived and worked in Poland completing something known then as European Voluntary Service (EVS). The programme is little-known in the UK, but enables all young people legally resident in Europe, aged between 18 and 30, to carry out an international volunteer service for NGOs, charities, or public bodies for a period ranging from two to 12 months. The only other prerequisite is that the volunteering must be done outside of your home nation. 

	 

	Before starting my research career, I wanted to live somewhere outside of the UK and this provided a unique opportunity to come into contact with a different culture and acquire new skills and abilities that would be useful for my personal and professional growth upon my return. I jumped at the chance then to go and live with four other volunteers from France, Portugal and Macedonia, where we worked in a local volunteer centre in the city of Kielce.  

	

	 

	As well as being involved in the organisation of 'International Evenings' that brought together volunteers, local students and Erasmus students, I ran weekly workshops in Communicative English and a Current Affairs discussion through a programme called Przystanek M?odych, or 'Bus Stop for Youth', which provided a free learning platform for local residents in our city, and visited local schools and universities for cultural exchange sessions and discussions on the value of volunteer work. A proudest achievement was organising a 'Human Library', where people were 'books' that you could rent out for 15-minute discussions about anything and everything to do with that person, hopefully broadening the minds of those who came along to talk and learn.

	 

	Earlier this year, before the nationwide lockdown, I was invited to return to Poland to attend a week-long conference and evaluation meeting alongside other former-volunteers because in 2018, the EVS programme was replaced by something new, called European Solidarity Corps (ESC). The overall aims of the week were to think about how better to promote ESC projects amongst young people and how to encourage and prepare volunteers to participate in them. Once a volunteer arrives, it can sometimes feel like quite a daunting experience to be dropped in an entirely different country, so we also discussed how to manage a group of international volunteers well and how to maintain motivation and commitment to these longer-term projects. 

	 

	An amazing thing about working at DJS Research is that they provide you with one day a year to volunteer for something close to your heart. My nine months in Poland were a very formative experience for me and helped shape my openness and tolerance to anyone and everyone, so I was delighted to be able to use this volunteer day (alongside some annual leave!) to head back to Kielce and discuss the merits of the programme amongst like-minded people. I'm sure everyone at DJS Research is excited to be able to use their volunteer day in the coming months as the world starts to open up a bit more; I was just lucky enough to be able to use mine right before lockdown began!

	 

	It also felt important for me to attend the conference because the UK's participation in these multinational projects is under threat as they are partly funded by Erasmus, a scheme which might end in the UK when the transition period of leaving the EU is over. COVID-19 has obviously thrown another small spanner in the works with regards to international travel but I wanted to write this blog post to highlight the fact that free travel and work opportunities are still available.  

	

	 

	If you have siblings, nieces, nephews, children who are unsure of their next steps... If you personally feel like a completely new and different challenge, then take a look at what alternative options are available to you. Living in Poland changed my outlook on life. Although I had free accommodation and local travel, I survived (and thrived) on euro;180 each month and met some lifelong friends who still today remain important people in my life. Every volunteer project is different, read up about them, find something you love the sound of and apply! There are short-term projects available through the ESC programme too for those who feel more constrained by time. It's a big world out there; we should definitely take the opportunity to explore it!

	Get more DJS News: 

	Our contribution during the Covid-19 crisis

	 

	Confirmation Bias, Market Research and Dominic Cummings

	 

	Searching for meaning: a tongue in cheek look at trends on Trends

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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Jack-went-to-Poland-What-I-did-with-my-DJS-volunteering-day
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					Review of the year 2020: it's been a very different year!
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				<description>
					
	
		
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Review-of-the-year-2020-its-been-a-very-different-year
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					DJS Research - Review of the Year 2019
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Review-of-the-Year-2019
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					Fundraising in the age of Covid-19: Our 25 on the 25th Challenge for the Thomas Theyer Foundation
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Fundraising-in-the-age-of-Covid-19-Our-25-on-the-25th-Challenge-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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					Unwrapping Christmas retail for the fashion sector
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Unwrapping-Christmas-retail-for-the-fashion-sector
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					We've been awarded the WRAP qualitative services contract!
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				<description>
					
	

	 

	
		We are delighted to announce, that following a two-stage tendering process, DJS Research has been awarded a sole supplier contract to provide WRAP (Waste  Resources Action Programme) with qualitative research services. Over the next three years we will be collaborating with WRAP, and their partners, across all WRAP's priority areas, specifically:
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Weve-been-awarded-the-WRAP-qualitative-services-contract
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					Well done Alex for completing the 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon!
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		It's been a year like no other - with restrictions and closures and life as we knew it being turned on its head due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Many events have been postponed and live sport has been hugely affected - but earlier this month, the most famous marathon in the world finally got underway...
				</description>
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Well-done-Alex-for-completing-the-2020-Virgin-Money-London-Marathon
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					We're Hiring! We have two new positions at our growing agency
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Were-Hiring-We-have-two-new-positions-at-our-growing-agency
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					We are pleased to announce the promotion of Elliot Simmonds to Research Director
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-pleased-to-announce-promotion-of-Elliot-Simmonds-to-Research-Director
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-pleased-to-announce-promotion-of-Elliot-Simmonds-to-Research-Director
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					Words to live by? How the language we speak influences our behaviour
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				<description>
					
	
		Written by Elliot Simmonds, Research Director. Email Elliot or comment on LinkedIn.
	
		 
	
		
	
		 
	
		
			It's an oft-repeated notion that Eskimos have 50 words for snow. The truth of this is debatable and I'm no linguist. Still, the idea, right or wrong, raises some questions. Does the place we live influence the language we speak? Beyond that, does the language we speak influence the way we think, and does the way we speak impact how we act?
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Words-to-live-by-How-the-language-we-speak-influences-our-behaviour
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					We are recruiting again!
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-recruiting-again
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-recruiting-again
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					Our contribution during the Covid-19 crisis
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-contribution-during-the-Covid-19-crisis
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-contribution-during-the-Covid-19-crisis
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					Confirmation Bias, Market Research and Dominic Cummings
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				<description>
					
	
		Written by Alasdair Gleed, Research Director. Email Alasdair
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Confirmation-Bias-Market-Research-and-Dominic-Cummings
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Confirmation-Bias-Market-Research-and-Dominic-Cummings
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					GANTT Chart for Market Research
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				<description>
					
 A GANTT chart is a horizontal bar chart used to show key dates in a project including the start and finish. In market research, it is used to plan a project effectively, to help reduce stress and to help the project be more time efficient. A well-made GANTT chart will show which tasks can be done in parallel with each other, and which have to follow a specific timeline to complete in order. It can also show which parts of a project are a main priority and which can be delayed a short time.

  

 To make an effective GANTT chart, the first action is to list the objectives and goals of the project so the tasks in the chart are all directed towards the main aim of the study. Next, realistic dates should be set out – not too short to ensure the project is completed, but not too long to make sure it is performed in the most time efficient way. Once the goals and timings have been decided, the tasks must be listed so the team can do their work in parallel to others and separately. Furthermore, the tasks should be assigned to specific people to ensure no confusion about who is doing what. Finally, the project can begin; however, the progress of each task must be monitored and evaluated regularly to make sure the project being completed at the desired pace and finished on time.
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					Consumer Behaviour Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Consumer behaviour market research is a type of research that studies how customers behave and what makes them choose certain products. This data can help the company know how to package and sell their products in order to make new customers and keep existing ones. There are many ways the behaviour of the consumer can be observed, including: face-to-face interviews, email surveys and direct observation. It is also an effective way of knowing what the company's competitors are doing better in the eyes of the consumer.

  

 A big part of consumer behaviour is system 1 and 2 thinking – how we make decisions. System 1 is initial thoughts and is how we make most of our decisions. System 2 is when we make a decision based on more in-depth facts. For example, if a customer is deciding which packet of cereal to buy, they will most likely make their decision on the packaging (system 1), however, they could make their decision based on ingredients or calories (system 2).

  

 A further important factor to understand consumer behaviour is a company's brand equity. Good relations between a company and their customers will create a positive brand equity and increase sales over their competitors. A negative brand equity, commonly instigated by poor products or customer services, will change the consumer behaviour.
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					Statistical Margin of Error
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				<description>
					
 A statistical margin of error is used to express the amount of random sampling error in a research survey. Researchers will aim for a smaller margin of error as to increase the validity of their study and show they have sampled a good representation of the target population. Every research study will have a statistical margin of error, unless the study tests the whole of a target population.

  

 The margin of error in statistics also relates to the confidence interval of a research study. The confidence interval is an estimate that the whole target population will fall between a certain range of data. They measure the degree of uncertainty in a sample population and will often estimate between 95% and 99% confidence – when a greater number of participants are observed, the percentage of confidence increases, therefore the confidence interval decreases. The statistical margin of error is equal to half of the confidence interval, meaning that when more people are tested, the margin of error decreases, leading to a more valid study.

  

 If a survey is published without a margin of error specified, it could be viewed as incomplete. For example, if a research study stated that 29% of adults have cereal before work with an error margin of 4%, the data should be interpreted to be 25-33% of adults have cereal before work. Without the statistical margin of error, the data changes significantly and wouldn't be an accurate representation of the whole target population.
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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					Probability Sampling
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				<description>
					
 Probability sampling is a sampling method where all the participants, knowingly, have an equal chance at being selected based on probability. When a larger population is involved in a research study, it is not time or cost effective to observe everyone, so only a few are chosen. Probability sampling is used on the assumption that random selection would create an accurate representation of the whole target population.

  

 There are four types of probability sampling: simple random sampling, stratified random sampling, random cluster sampling and systematic sampling. Simple random sampling involves the researcher assigning each participant with a number, then using an automated, random number selector to decide which participants are chosen.

  

 The second type of probability sampling is stratified random sampling. Stratified random sampling involves the researcher putting each participant into smaller sub-groups that represent everyone in the target population. The sub-groups will not noticeably overlap and everyone in each group has an equal chance at being selected.

  

 Another method is random cluster sampling, which involves selecting participants randomly via geographical location. For example, to research people's views about the UK government, the researcher would take samples from various locations around the UK to gain a better oversight of the whole target population.

  

 The final method of probability sampling, systematic sampling, is when the researcher selects every nth person to be observed; for example, every 3rd person. This provides an equal chance of selection for all participants.
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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					Computer Aided Self-Interview (CASI)
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A computer aided self-interview is a research method that involves the respondent using a computer to answer a survey without there being an interviewer or respondent asking the questions or taking note of the answers. They are often used when the researcher is trying to ascertain sensitive information about someone as to ensure they are answering in an entirely confidential way. Usually performed at the respondent's home, computer aided self-interviews are easily accessible to anyone as long as they have a computer.

  

 There are two types of computer aided self-interview: audio and video. A video CASI is most commonly used; however, does require the participant to have a good level of eye-sight and to be able to read well. An audio CASI, on the other hand, allows people with limited or no vision to still participate in a research study.

  

 Computer aided self-interviews are often performed using software on a website allowing for, potentially, a worldwide audience and a greater amount of people to be able to access the survey. They are also relatively inexpensive because no researcher will need to be present. However, CASI surveys are targeting just people who own computers, possibly allowing bias into the study. Furthermore, they could also cause confusion for the respondent as a question may be open to interpretation. With no interviewer present, the respondent could answer the question incorrectly and it may be a biased answer.
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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					Hypothesis Testing Market Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Hypothesis testing is used to analyse two statements about a research study to assess which is best supported by the data. A regular hypothesis should be decided upon before the study has begun; however, to test it, a contrasting hypothesis is made as to see which correlates to the data best. This helps validate the research study by looking at multiple conflicting conclusions instead of just one. 

  

 Hypotheses are used in a range of scenarios, from a school Science classroom to a factory in the food industry. Any time there is a question that requires a study or research, there should also be a hypothesis. There are also a few different variations of a hypothesis, the most common being null or alternative hypothesis. A null hypothesis is used when it is not expected that there will be any significant difference between the two variables being studied and is normally the type of hypothesis a researcher would attempt to disprove. An alternative hypothesis is the opposite and states that there is a difference in the variables. Often when performing hypothesis testing, they will be measured against each other. For example, if the hypothesis at the start of the study was a null hypothesis, an alternative will be used after the study to test it.
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/glossary/item/
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					Neuromarketing Research
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				<description>
					
 Neuromarketing research is the area that studies neurological responses to stimuli such as advertisements or branding. Performing a neuromarketing study can help the researcher understand the subconscious decision making and thought process of a consumer through the use of science. Like many market research methodologies, it can involve a variety of different methods including traditional interviews and focus groups.

  

 Neuromarketing is important to understand when trying to promote a company or product. Understanding the unconscious thoughts that people experience when faced with differing stimuli is vital to tailor advertisement for a specific target market.

  

 An advantage of neuromarketing research is there are many different ways of conducting it, allowing the researcher to understand a consumer's unconscious thoughts. However, these methods are often costly when compared to other research strategies. Methodologies such as eye-tracking and functional MRI scans require equipment that is costly to rent or to buy, but do give a detailed insight into how a person thinks when faced with a certain stimulus.

  

 For example, performing an eye-tracking test, to find out what draws the attention of a specific demographic, could uncover that the participant first looks at the colour blue but then focusses on the colour red after a few seconds. In this case, the respondent might likely suggest that they only noticed the red section. However, the use of eye-tracking shows the researcher that the participant caught sight of the colour blue first, indicating a disparency between the consumer's conscious and sub-conscious thoughts.
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				<title>
					Pilot Study Market Research
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				<description>
					
 A pilot study is performed before the main research study has begun and is used to evaluate the key parts of the proposed study before fully committing. They are more commonly used, and are more effective with quantitative studies, because it is difficult to change a quantitative study after it has started. Qualitative studies, on the other hand, are easier to change and adapt after the main project has started.

  

 Performing a pilot study will often save time because it can uncover issues with the research study that were previously unnoticed. For example, if an important question was missing off a questionnaire, the researcher may have to analyse more data than is needed to see which participants are most suited to a particular study. However, with the question added after the pilot study, the number of viable participants may fall. Using this pilot study, the amount of data that needs to be analysed decreases, allowing for a quicker and easier process.

  

 A further use of a pilot study is to check that the client and the market research company work well together. A pilot study will show if they are on the same page or whether they have two contrasting ideas or plans. It can be viewed as a trial period for both the market research company and client.
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				<title>
					Semiotics in Market Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Semiotics is used in market research to help the researcher understand how and why individuals use their current environment to make decisions. Semiotics is the study of sign-using behaviour, meaning how people decide they will perform an action based on the signals they are given from the situation they're in. People use semiotics every day, for example, deciding what to wear based on how warm it is, or choosing to eat a lollipop because you fancy something sweet.

  

 In market research, semiotics is most useful when trying to understand the reasonings behind certain actions and decisions. Using semiotics, brands can tailor their products better to what the consumer is looking for, both consciously and unconsciously. 

  

 Performing many semiotic tests would be necessary, however, because what one person might view as a positive sign, another might view as negative. Understanding differences culturally and generationally can help researchers understand the differing opinions on the same signals. Often, posts on social media are open to much interpretation because, in text form, the message cannot be viewed with a tone of voice assigned to it, a sign that many people use when identifying sarcasm or when someone is serious.

  

 Other instances, such as slogans or logos, influence people's unconscious decisions differently because of their colour or design. The first reaction a customer has to a company is the most important one, so the brand must ensure a good message is portrayed through the slogan and logo.
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					Multiple Regression Analysis
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				<description>
					
 Multiple regression analysis is one of the most common types of linear regression analysis – linking dependent and independent variables to find trends. In contrast to simple linear regression, multiple linear regression is the term used when two or more independent variables are used to influence the dependent variable. Multiple linear regression analysis is viewed as more reliable and accurate than simple linear regression because of its ability to use two or more independent variables. Linear regression, as a whole, is used to view future trends and to see how much the dependent variables would change in certain scenarios (when the independent variables are changed).

  

 Companies will use multiple linear regression to enable them to predict future trends and to understand what causes changes to occur. For example, a university would like to find out why certain students perform better in exams than others. The independent variables in this study would be: number of lectures attended, amount of revision, and A-level grades, with the dependent variable being the exam mark. The research study found that students who attended the most lectures and did the most revision ended up with higher marks than the students who did less revision and went to less lectures. However, the researcher found no correlation between previous A-level results and the outcome of the exam. This research would allow the university to focus more on lectures and revision, than on previous test results.
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				<title>
					Double-Blind Market Research
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				<description>
					
 When conducting a research study, there are independent, control and dependent variables (things that can affect the study that change, stay the same and are measured). In a double-blind research study, neither the researcher or the participants know which variable is being altered to avoid bias. For example, the participants are testing out two, similar video games by different companies; however, neither the researcher or the participants know the title of the game, or the company that made it. This will avoid any previous opinions about the company or game title influencing the study.

  

 A double-blind research study does vary slightly from a single-blind research study where only the participants do not know which variable is being studied or changed. An advantage of a double-blind research study is the ability to eliminate a possible bias from both the participant and the researcher. However, not allowing the participants or the researcher to know key details, means the study will not reflect a real-life scenario. Furthermore, it is not always a possibility that a double-blind study can be completed all the time because there must be a reliable way to randomly select participants into different groups.

  

 Double-blind testing is often used in the medical industry to analyse how a drug works. One group of patients will be given a placebo while the other group will be given the drug in question. All participants will be informed that half will get the drug and half will get the placebo, abiding by the informed consent rules.
				</description>
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				<title>
					Market Research Code of Conduct
				</title>
				<description>
					
 The market research code of conducted is a list of regulations that market researchers follow when conducting a research study. It outlines the responsibilities of the researchers towards the participants and the data found. The UK professional body for research (Market Research Society) has established a code of conduct which all of its members must follow. This allows support for members but also increases confidence in the public that market research is being performed ethically and within the guidelines.

  

 All code of conducts range from the protection of the participant to the confidentiality of the data - to ensure the reputation of the industry is not tarnished at any point. Research bodies such as the European Society for Opinion and Market Research (ESOMAR) have their own code of conduct specifically for members, however most market research code of conducts will share the same points as they are all trying to achieve the same thing.

  

 Code of conducts are sometimes changed to abide with new laws and regulations, such as the UK Data Protection Act of 2018. However, they will have similarities to the first code of conducts established in the mid-20th century. For example, the Market Research Society code of conduct was first published in 1954 with the most recent change being in 2019. The ESOMAR code of conduct was first made in 1948 having been changed in 2017.
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				<title>
					Data Protection in Market Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Data protection in market research is covered by a selection of international and national laws that outline how researchers should collect and store data safely. These laws are used in a variety of different industries; however, they are often simplified in the professional body's code of conduct. The use of data protection in market research allows for the public to have confidence that their information isn't being used unethically, thus maintaining the reputation of the market research industry.

  

 The data protection laws have changed slightly since they were first established, with the last change in the UK being in 2018. This alteration saw a change in the Market Research Society code of conduct, which was then amended in 2019.

  

 The General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) are regulations in EU law that aim to give primary control to individuals over their data. It also helps regulate the transfer of data into and out of the EU. This law has meant new requirements for consent for the use and distribution of data that has encouraged many new regulations across the world to include the same parameters.

  

 The advancements in technology have brought new concerns amongst the public about data protection. Online shopping websites have access to everything that customers search for on their website, which allows them to advertise products specifically for them. Furthermore, advertisements that appear on certain websites are often tailored specifically for the user based on their recent purchases and search results, allowing for greater concerns in the wider public.
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				<title>
					Data Cleaning in Market Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Data cleaning is an important aspect of market research and is linked to analysis once all the data has been collected. When done correctly, it ensures that all the useful data is separated from the unnecessary. The use of data cleaning helps to improve the quality of the information obtained, and makes it easier to analyse. Furthermore, ignoring the unnecessary data will make the results easier to understand once the research study has been completed. 

  

 The process of data cleaning can be performed automatically by software or manually by the researcher. There are main points that the researcher will look for when cleaning data, the first of which is unwanted observations. The second is duplicated observations, so findings that have occurred twice or more that only need to be included once in the overall study. Sorting out irrelevant observations is also key when cleaning data as to keep the data-set as manageable as possible, with as little unnecessary information as possible. 

  

 A common method for finding unwanted data is to put all the data into a table or graph which makes it easier to find anomalous results and outliers in the data. This will also mean the wanted data is then well structured and easier to analyse. The graph or chart might, however, show data that is missing which the researcher can either choose to leave out or to make an educated guess as to what the data is. This can increase the validation of the research study; however, the researcher must always state when they have inputted missing data.
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				<title>
					Word Clouds in Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Word clouds are a spatial information visualization approach used in market research to transform written content into engaging imagery. While they often gain criticism because of the incorrect ways they are used (often wrongly used for quantitative data), they can be very useful in telling the audience what the main theme is. When used properly, they can add some colour to a research report to keep the readers engaged. Ultimately, word clouds are big, colourful word collages that can be adapted to show any theme, or to put a specific topic in the forefront.

  

 An effective way of using word clouds is to decide on the size of each word based on how frequently it appears throughout the report. The more important the word, the bigger it should look in the word cloud. This allows for an easy way to portray different shapes and sizes that is easy to follow for the audience. 

  

 The downside to the perceived easiness of word clouds is that different people may take different aspects of it away, and have a varying understanding of the message. The simplicity means it could lack detail and take away the desired meaning. This should be taken into consideration, both when reading and producing it, as to ensure the wrong message isn't portrayed.
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				<title>
					Data Mining Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Data mining is used in market research to uncover useful information from a large collection of data using computer software.  This software can sort through information and find patterns from raw data to be used in research studies. Advances in data storage and collection mean that large amounts of information can now be stored in one place, which has allowed for the advancement in data mining to find the key patterns from the stored data.

  

 Data mining is often used to gain a greater insight into consumers' preferences, such as what they buy online. Data mining software can be used to look at what customers add to their online cart, and then suggest other products that people with similar interests had purchased previously. This allows for a more personalised shopping experience for the user and improve the company's marketing strategy.

  

 The fact that data mining uses automated software to uncover data means it is very efficient at picking out data – saving time and resources. It also helps predict future trends to allow businesses to prepare for the future and create better marketing campaigns. Furthermore, it helps put reasoning behind businesses keeping large amounts of data as, without data mining, they wouldn't have any use for it. However, concerns about data privacy have been expressed by customers because of how much information is being stored and how it can be looked at in detail.
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					Choice-Based Conjoint Analysis
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Choice-based conjoint analysis is a methodology used in market research that focuses on consumers' choices instead of facts and figures. It is used by companies to compare the customer's opinion, often in a real-life scenario, against their competitors to assess which is most likely to be chosen. This methodology can also be used to ascertain what the price of a product should be, based off consumer opinion.

  

 When conducting a choice-based conjoint analysis study, the researcher's aim is to find out which factors have the greatest influence on the participant's decisions. For example, the researcher could show the participant a picture of a virtual shelf replicating a supermarket cereal aisle and ask the respondent to select which product they would pick. Possibly using other methodologies such as eye-tracker, the researcher could work out which features of the products were most appealing for the participant.

  

 An advantage of performing choice-based conjoint analysis is that it can include any specific features the company wants it to; anything from the main packaging to the exact ingredients and price. Therefore, this will give it the ability to create a real world setting better than other methodologies. However, choice-based conjoint analysis takes up a significant amount of time compared to the amount of data the researcher will gain from it.
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					Ad Positioning Statement Testing Market Research
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				<description>
					
 Ad positioning statement testing is used to define the position of a certain brand in the mind of the consumer. This methodology is used in market research to show companies how their customers, and prospective customers, view their brand. It is often used in comparison to other similar brands or in comparison to where the company wants to be. The positioning of a brand is important to a company because if a possible consumer doesn't like the brand, they more than likely won't buy the product. 

  

 Conducting market research into this is crucial for a company and for its brand. Before a research study into the brand positioning is started, the researcher must make sure they have identified the criteria that could improve the brand positioning – such as a slogan. Testing different slogans can be time consuming because of the vast array of choices. For this reason, the researcher must understand the consumer language and tailor the slogans for that. Furthermore, studying the effects of small details about the product (such as mentioning ingredients) on the brand positioning is also time consuming and pointless; for example, studying whether people will buy a product with four more grams of fat.

  

 At the end of testing, the researcher would get a set of quantitative results to analyse and portray back to the company. This makes it easier to write the report, but also for the company to gain a better understanding of what works best for them.
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					Brand Mapping Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Brand mapping is used in market research to help businesses understand how their brand is performing based on comparisons with their competitors. A common way of using brand mapping effectively is to use a four-quadrant grid with different qualities that the business wants to compare; for example, quality of product. This way it will be easy to see which areas companies are lacking in, compared to their competitors.

  

 To create a successful brand map, the market research company will often interview a group of participants, asking about the specific qualities the company wants to know. They will ask closed questions that illicit quantitative data as to make analysis easier and ensure their data can be put onto a grid. However, this doesn't take into account the participants thoughts on the brand itself.

  

 Also known as perceptual mapping, brand mapping mainly uses numbers and stats to draw their data from; however, customer perception is more important. The brand equity of a brand matters more than figures because if someone doesn't like the company, they won't purchase its products, no matter how much better they are. For example, company A and B sell smartphones and company A has better technology and systems for their phones so score highly on the brand map. However, company B have been selling smart-phones for longer so their customers feel a loyalty to them.
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					Structured Question in Market Research
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A structured question is a closed question used in surveys to illicit fast and precise answers while reducing the amount of thinking the participant does. These types of questions will also reduce the workload on the researcher as the answers will be simple and easy to analyse. When numerous structured questions are put together, they can reveal a large amount of information in a short space of time, while still allowing for an in-depth survey.

  

 There are many different forms of a structured question, however, some are more common than others. A single response with ordinal categories is a type of structured question that asks the participant to select the range that they fall into; for example: 'please select the category that includes your annual income'. A scaled question is used alongside answers such as 'agree' and 'disagree' or a simple number scale to allow an easy way to express an opinion. A multiple response question is also a common form of structured question and is used when the researcher wants a selection of answers, such as: 'Which of these countries have you been to?'.

  

 Structured questions can also be used alongside unstructured questions (open questions) to illicit a little bit more information from a respondent, or to create contingency questions (one response leads to a new, specific question). For example, the structured question could be 'Have you ever owned an android phone?'. If the answer is 'yes' then the researcher can proceed to ask their opinion about it, using unstructured questions.
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					Survey reveals improvements UK public want to see to public transport in order to use it more frequently
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey reveals improvements UK public want to see to public transport in order to use it more frequently: A piece of research has revealed the improvements that the British public would like to see made to public transport in order for them to use it more frequently, with 'less crowding' the most important change cited.
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-improvements-UK-public-want-to-see-to-public-transport-in-order-to-use-it-more-frequently-04853
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					Survey reveals top goals of oil and gas leaders and investors in 2021
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey reveals top goals of oil and gas leaders and investors in 2021: A PwC survey of 120 institutional investors, analysts, and oil and gas executives has revealed the top goals for the coming year.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-reveals-top-goals-of-oil-and-gas-leaders-and-investors-in-2021-04827
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					Oil and Gas engineers found to have highest salary in industry survey, yet 29% are not satisfied
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 Oil and Gas engineers found to have best salary in industry survey: A survey of engineers working across a range of sectors has found that Oil and Gas professionals have the highest salary – however, they are also one of the least satisfied with how much they earn.
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Oil-and-Gas-engineers-found-to-have-highest-salary-in-industry-survey-yet-29percent-are-not-satisfied-04848
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					Survey suggests climate change activism is presenting a significant legal risk to oil and gas companies
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey suggests climate change activism is presenting a significant legal risk to oil and gas companies: A survey of senior legal managers and senior in-house counsel in the oil and gas industry has revealed that more than a third believe that net zero actions carried out by activists, shareholders or investors pose a 'real risk' to their companies.
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-suggests-climate-change-activism-is-presenting-a-significant-legal-risk-to-oil-and-gas-companies-04849
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					A third of social media users don't trust apps with their data after concerns about data security, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 A third of social media users don't trust apps with their data after concerns about data security: A survey has revealed that 33% of people who use social media platforms have security concerns when it comes to the apps they use.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/A-third-of-social-media-users-dont-trust-apps-with-their-data-after-concerns-about-data-security-reveals-survey-04855
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					Bike sales nearly doubled over last 12 months due to lockdown restrictions, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Bike sales nearly doubled over last 12 months due to lockdown restrictions: In the year since March 2020, bike sales have increased by 193%, according to a recent poll, with more people taking to cycling during lockdown.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Bike-sales-nearly-doubled-over-last-12-months-due-to-lockdown-restrictions-reveals-survey-04854
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Bike-sales-nearly-doubled-over-last-12-months-due-to-lockdown-restrictions-reveals-survey-04854
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					Female leaders in logistics are rated higher than male counterparts in six key areas, according to survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Female leaders in logistics are rated higher than male counterparts in six key areas: A survey of people working in logistics has found that female managers are rated more highly than their male counterparts in six out of seven key areas
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Female-leaders-in-logistics-are-rated-higher-than-male-counterparts-in-six-key-areas-according-to-survey-04747
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Female-leaders-in-logistics-are-rated-higher-than-male-counterparts-in-six-key-areas-according-to-survey-04747
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					Cars will continue to be first transport choice for around half journeys post-Covid, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Cars will continue to be first transport choice for around half journeys post-Covid: A survey of UK adults has found that people in the UK largely expect to return to the mode of travel they used before the pandemic when life returns to 'normal', with cars the preferred choice for around half journeys.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Cars-will-continue-to-be-first-transport-choice-for-around-half-journeys-post-Covid-finds-survey-04852
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Cars-will-continue-to-be-first-transport-choice-for-around-half-journeys-post-Covid-finds-survey-04852
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					43% of charities say mental health and wellbeing will be a challenge in 2021, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 43% of charities say mental health and wellbeing will be a challenge in 2021: A survey of SME businesses has found that 43% of charities polled believe a key challenge for 2021 will be mental health and wellbeing following the year-long pandemic. This was also a concern for other sectors including education (45%) and energy and utilities (36%).
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/43percent-of-charities-say-mental-health-and-wellbeing-will-be-a-challenge-in-2021-reveals-survey-04801
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/43percent-of-charities-say-mental-health-and-wellbeing-will-be-a-challenge-in-2021-reveals-survey-04801
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					Fall in travel tourism is top reason given for decline in museum visitor numbers during summer reopenings, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Fall in travel tourism is top reason given for decline in museum visitor numbers during summer reopenings: The latest survey by Nemo (Network of European Museum Organisations) has found that a fall in travel tourism is the top reason given by museums for the decline in visitor numbers (compared to previous levels), during their summer reopenings.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Fall-in-travel-tourism-is-top-reason-given-for-decline-in-museum-visitor-numbers-during-summer-reopenings-reveals-survey-04776
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Fall-in-travel-tourism-is-top-reason-given-for-decline-in-museum-visitor-numbers-during-summer-reopenings-reveals-survey-04776
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Two-thirds of museums in Nemo poll have received emergency government funding, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Two-thirds of museums in Nemo poll have received emergency government funding: A survey has found that 66% of museums surveyed as part of research by the Network of European Museum Organisations (Nemo) have received emergency funding support from national, regional or local government sources. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Two-thirds-of-museums-in-Nemo-poll-have-received-emergency-government-funding-reveals-survey-04787
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Two-thirds-of-museums-in-Nemo-poll-have-received-emergency-government-funding-reveals-survey-04787
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Museum visits around the world fell by 77% in 2020, according to global survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Museum visits around the world fell by 77% in 2020: A survey conducted by The Art Newspaper has revealed that as a result of the global pandemic, museum visits to 100 of the world's most visited art museums fell by more than three-quarters (77%) last year.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Museum-visits-around-the-world-fell-by-77percent-in-2020-according-to-global-survey-04841
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Museum-visits-around-the-world-fell-by-77percent-in-2020-according-to-global-survey-04841
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Survey finds that more people are smoking due to Covid-19 stress
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Survey finds that more people are smoking due to Covid-19 stress: A survey has shone a light on an increase in smoking during the pandemic, with young people found to be the group most likely to be smoking more regularly.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-finds-that-more-people-are-smoking-due-to-Covid-19-stress-04851
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Survey-finds-that-more-people-are-smoking-due-to-Covid-19-stress-04851
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Two-fifths of people are concerned about pressure to socialise post lockdown due to financial restrictions, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Two-fifths of people are concerned about pressure to socialise post lockdown due to financial restrictions: As the UK begins to open up again following the third national lockdown, a survey has found that 38.1% are feeling 'concerned' over pressure from friends and family to go out and socialise one again when they can't afford to do so.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Two-fifths-of-people-are-concerned-about-pressure-to-socialise-post-lockdown-due-to-financial-restrictions-finds-survey-04850
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Two-fifths-of-people-are-concerned-about-pressure-to-socialise-post-lockdown-due-to-financial-restrictions-finds-survey-04850
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Coding revealed to be top skill learned during Covid-19 lockdowns, according to poll
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Coding revealed to be top skill learned during Covid-19 lockdowns: According to the results of a recent poll, more than half the people who were looking to upskill during the pandemic, chose coding (or other software developing) in a bid to improve their employment and career opportunities. 
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Coding-revealed-to-be-top-skill-learned-during-Covid-19-lockdowns-according-to-poll-04843
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Coding-revealed-to-be-top-skill-learned-during-Covid-19-lockdowns-according-to-poll-04843
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					69% of broadband users suffered connectivity issues in 2020, reveals survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 69% of broadband users suffered connectivity issues in 2020: A survey of broadband users has found that nearly seven in 10 experienced connectivity issues with their broadband service during 2020; the year the world first grappled with the impact of Covid-19.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/69percent-of-broadband-users-suffered-connectivity-issues-in-2020-reveals-survey-04842
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/69percent-of-broadband-users-suffered-connectivity-issues-in-2020-reveals-survey-04842
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					27% of recent homebuyers say saving during lockdown has helped them get on property ladder
				</title>
				<description>
					
 27% of recent homebuyers say saving during lockdown has helped them get on property ladder: When we think of the last year and the chaos that Covid-19 has wreaked the world over, it may be hard to believe there have been many positive outcomes.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/27percent-of-recent-homebuyers-say-saving-during-lockdown-has-helped-them-get-on-property-ladder-04844
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/27percent-of-recent-homebuyers-say-saving-during-lockdown-has-helped-them-get-on-property-ladder-04844
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Six out of 10 engineers working in manufacturing sector are happy in their current job, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Six out of 10 engineers working in manufacturing sector are happy in their current job: The Engineer has published the findings of its latest annual engineering survey, finding that salaries have risen by an average of 10% since 2019. It also found that 60% of engineers working in the manufacturing sector are happy in their current role.  
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Six-out-of-10-engineers-working-in-manufacturing-sector-are-happy-in-their-current-job-finds-survey-04847
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Six-out-of-10-engineers-working-in-manufacturing-sector-are-happy-in-their-current-job-finds-survey-04847
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					More than half engineers working in Chemicals and Pharma sector are happy in their current job, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 More than half engineers working in Chemicals and Pharma sector are happy in their current job: A survey of engineers across twelve sectors has found that 56% of those working in the chemicals/pharma and medical sector are happy in their current job.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/More-than-half-engineers-working-in-Chemicals-and-Pharma-sector-are-happy-in-their-current-job-finds-survey-04846
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/More-than-half-engineers-working-in-Chemicals-and-Pharma-sector-are-happy-in-their-current-job-finds-survey-04846
				</guid>
			</item>
			<item>
				<title>
					Engineers in Energy and Renewables sector are most satisfied with their pay, finds survey
				</title>
				<description>
					
 Engineers in Energy and Renewables sector are most satisfied with their pay: A survey of engineers across eleven sectors has found that those working in the Energy/Renewables/Nuclear sector are the most satisfied with their salary.
				</description>
				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Engineers-in-Energy-and-Renewables-sector-are-most-satisfied-with-their-pay-finds-survey-04845
				</link>
				<guid>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/blog/article/Engineers-in-Energy-and-Renewables-sector-are-most-satisfied-with-their-pay-finds-survey-04845
				</guid>
			</item>
		</channel>
	</rss>