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			<title>Market Research RSS Feeds</title>
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			<description>Market Research RSS Feeds</description>
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					40 more decades of loyalty from DJS staff!
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/40-more-decades-of-loyalty-from-DJS-staff
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					Jack went to Poland: What I did with my DJS volunteering day...
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				<description>
							 	 	 	 	 	 	 	 	Written by Jack Watson, Research Manager	 	For nine months in 2016, I lived and worked in Poland completing something known then as European Voluntary Service (EVS). The programme is little-known in the UK, but enables all young people legally resident in Europe, aged between 18 and 30, to carry out an international volunteer service for NGOs, charities, or public bodies for a period ranging from two to 12 months. The only other prerequisite is that the volunteering must be done outside of your home nation. 	 	Before starting my research career, I wanted to live somewhere outside of the UK and this provided a unique opportunity to come into contact with a different culture and acquire new skills and abilities that would be useful for my personal and professional growth upon my return. I jumped at the chance then to go and live with four other volunteers from France, Portugal and Macedonia, where we worked in a local volunteer centre in the city of Kielce.  		 	As well as being involved in the organisation of 'International Evenings' that brought together volunteers, local students and Erasmus students, I ran weekly workshops in Communicative English and a Current Affairs discussion through a programme called Przystanek M?odych, or 'Bus Stop for Youth', which provided a free learning platform for local residents in our city, and visited local schools and universities for cultural exchange sessions and discussions on the value of volunteer work. A proudest achievement was organising a 'Human Library', where people were 'books' that you could rent out for 15-minute discussions about anything and everything to do with that person, hopefully broadening the minds of those who came along to talk and learn.	 	Earlier this year, before the nationwide lockdown, I was invited to return to Poland to attend a week-long conference and evaluation meeting alongside other former-volunteers because in 2018, the EVS programme was replaced by something new, called European Solidarity Corps (ESC). The overall aims of the week were to think about how better to promote ESC projects amongst young people and how to encourage and prepare volunteers to participate in them. Once a volunteer arrives, it can sometimes feel like quite a daunting experience to be dropped in an entirely different country, so we also discussed how to manage a group of international volunteers well and how to maintain motivation and commitment to these longer-term projects. 	 	An amazing thing about working at DJS Research is that they provide you with one day a year to volunteer for something close to your heart. My nine months in Poland were a very formative experience for me and helped shape my openness and tolerance to anyone and everyone, so I was delighted to be able to use this volunteer day (alongside some annual leave!) to head back to Kielce and discuss the merits of the programme amongst like-minded people. I'm sure everyone at DJS Research is excited to be able to use their volunteer day in the coming months as the world starts to open up a bit more; I was just lucky enough to be able to use mine right before lockdown began!	 	It also felt important for me to attend the conference because the UK's participation in these multinational projects is under threat as they are partly funded by Erasmus, a scheme which might end in the UK when the transition period of leaving the EU is over. COVID-19 has obviously thrown another small spanner in the works with regards to international travel but I wanted to write this blog post to highlight the fact that free travel and work opportunities are still available.  		 	If you have siblings, nieces, nephews, children who are unsure of their next steps... If you personally feel like a completely new and different challenge, then take a look at what alternative options are available to you. Living in Poland changed my outlook on life. Although I had free accommodation and local travel, I survived (and thrived) on euro;180 each month and met some lifelong friends who still today remain important people in my life. Every volunteer project is different, read up about them, find something you love the sound of and apply! There are short-term projects available through the ESC programme too for those who feel more constrained by time. It's a big world out there; we should definitely take the opportunity to explore it!	Get more DJS News: 	Our contribution during the Covid-19 crisis	 	Confirmation Bias, Market Research and Dominic Cummings	 	Searching for meaning: a tongue in cheek look at trends on Trends
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Jack-went-to-Poland-What-I-did-with-my-DJS-volunteering-day
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Jack-went-to-Poland-What-I-did-with-my-DJS-volunteering-day
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					Reframing project management – a person centred approach.
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											But what do you actually do?			At this point in a normal year, you'd find me steeling myself for a season of awkward gatherings. Smiling patiently while distant and aged relatives perform their annual interrogation:
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Reframing-project-management-a-person-centred-approach
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Reframing-project-management-a-person-centred-approach
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					Review of the year 2020: it's been a very different year!
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Review-of-the-year-2020-its-been-a-very-different-year
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					DJS Research - Review of the Year 2019
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Review-of-the-Year-2019
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Review-of-the-Year-2019
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					Fundraising in the age of Covid-19: Our 25 on the 25th Challenge for the Thomas Theyer Foundation
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Fundraising-in-the-age-of-Covid-19-Our-25-on-the-25th-Challenge-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Fundraising-in-the-age-of-Covid-19-Our-25-on-the-25th-Challenge-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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					Unwrapping Christmas retail for the fashion sector
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Unwrapping-Christmas-retail-for-the-fashion-sector
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					We've been awarded the WRAP qualitative services contract!
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							 			We are delighted to announce, that following a two-stage tendering process, DJS Research has been awarded a sole supplier contract to provide WRAP (Waste  Resources Action Programme) with qualitative research services. Over the next three years we will be collaborating with WRAP, and their partners, across all WRAP's priority areas, specifically:
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Weve-been-awarded-the-WRAP-qualitative-services-contract
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Weve-been-awarded-the-WRAP-qualitative-services-contract
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					Well done Alex for completing the 2020 Virgin Money London Marathon!
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								It's been a year like no other - with restrictions and closures and life as we knew it being turned on its head due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Many events have been postponed and live sport has been hugely affected - but earlier this month, the most famous marathon in the world finally got underway...
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Well-done-Alex-for-completing-the-2020-Virgin-Money-London-Marathon
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Well-done-Alex-for-completing-the-2020-Virgin-Money-London-Marathon
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					We're Hiring! We have two new positions at our growing agency
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Were-Hiring-We-have-two-new-positions-at-our-growing-agency
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Were-Hiring-We-have-two-new-positions-at-our-growing-agency
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					We are pleased to announce the promotion of Elliot Simmonds to Research Director
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-pleased-to-announce-promotion-of-Elliot-Simmonds-to-Research-Director
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-pleased-to-announce-promotion-of-Elliot-Simmonds-to-Research-Director
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					Words to live by? How the language we speak influences our behaviour
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								Written by Elliot Simmonds, Research Director. Email Elliot or comment on LinkedIn.			 						 						It's an oft-repeated notion that Eskimos have 50 words for snow. The truth of this is debatable and I'm no linguist. Still, the idea, right or wrong, raises some questions. Does the place we live influence the language we speak? Beyond that, does the language we speak influence the way we think, and does the way we speak impact how we act?
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Words-to-live-by-How-the-language-we-speak-influences-our-behaviour
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Words-to-live-by-How-the-language-we-speak-influences-our-behaviour
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					We are recruiting again!
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-recruiting-again
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/We-are-recruiting-again
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					Our contribution during the Covid-19 crisis
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-contribution-during-the-Covid-19-crisis
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Our-contribution-during-the-Covid-19-crisis
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					Confirmation Bias, Market Research and Dominic Cummings
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								Written by Alasdair Gleed, Research Director. Email Alasdair
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Confirmation-Bias-Market-Research-and-Dominic-Cummings
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Confirmation-Bias-Market-Research-and-Dominic-Cummings
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					Healthwatch publishes our research looking at young people's experiences of mental healthcare
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											 			Healthwatch has published the research we undertook for the organisation last year, looking at young people's experiences of mental healthcare and what can be done to improve it. 			 			The statutory body, which exists to understand the needs, experiences and concerns of people who use health and social care services, has heard from more than 20,000 young people over the last three years. Our research sought to gain a deeper understanding of the issues facing young people, and their experiences accessing and using mental healthcare services, which are outlined in our video published on the Healthwatch website.			 			The Research			 			The research saw us speak to 47 young people aged 16-25 about what affects their mental health, their experiences of mental healthcare, as well as asking them how they would like to see extra funding used to support them.			 			The findings helped shape Healthwatch's 'Three Steps to improve mental health support for young people'.			 			From the research, it was concluded that better education and communication, more options and personalised care, as well as peer support are needed in order to better support young people across local communities, and improve their experiences of mental healthcare. 			 			What young people want:			 			The young people we spoke to for Healthwatch said they'd like to see ongoing support for their emotional wellbeing and longer follow-up treatments, as well as realistic portrayals of mental health in the media, which they hoped would in turn reduce stigma. They also told us they would like mental health to form part of the formal school curriculum, and have access to free mental health check ups for young people every six months.  						 			Take a look at the video and read the report here	Get more DJS News: 	Our research helps Healthwatch define its 'Three steps to improve mental health support for young people'	 	For the Love of Scrubs: What I did with my DJS Volunteering Day...	 	When everyone is busy being objectively similar, try cultivating your subjective difference...
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Healthwatch-publishes-our-research-looking-at-young-peoples-experiences-of-mental-healthcare
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Healthwatch-publishes-our-research-looking-at-young-peoples-experiences-of-mental-healthcare
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					Searching for meaning: a tongue in cheek look at trends on Trends
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											Written by Elliot Simmonds, Associate Director. Email Elliot			 			One of the great things about the modern era is the availability of information ' both to us as individual consumers, but also to those of us whose job it is to distil information down in to meaning. And by 'meaning', I mean a collection of charts which illustrate some things I find interesting or amusing. If you've come for hard-hitting analysis and insight, you're probably best reading something from Alex McCluckie.			 			Despite its many ills, one perceived 'positive' aspect of COVID-19, at least originally, was the opportunity to slow-down, spend some time doing those things we had always meant to do, and maybe improve ourselves as human beings a little bit. Blog posts abound on the topic. Course delivery and educational sites downed their paywalls, Audible by Amazon is giving away free digital versions of audio book classics you've always wanted to read, but never have (Paradise Lost, anyone?) and Joe Wicks is going to turn you in to an Adonis, you Adonis.[1]			 			At least that was the plan. But our habits are, for the most part, difficult to break - and I wanted to explore a little bit of what we'd really been getting up to. There's a lot of survey data knocking about on the topic already, and so another COVID-19 Tracker felt like one too many - although, if you are specifically interested in a culture audience, please drop me an email. 			 			As a free data source, with a fairly large sample size, Google Trends isn't a bad place to start. Whilst my initial focus was on habits, this quickly descended in to 'interesting stuff' and what follows is a fairly loosely connected examination of some of the things we in the UK have been searching for on Google - I hope you find it interesting, enlightening and, in some cases, amusing, in equal measure.[2]			 			Health and leisure			Starting with that quest for fitness, we saw an initial clamour for multi-gyms which was at a five-year high.			 				 	However, the fitness craze quickly began to drop off:	 		 			And we turned to other priorities:			 						 						 			 						 			The laying of patio actually comes from personal experience - at least three members of my close friendship group (yep, 60%) have undertaken some sort of landscaping project and, generally, with a great deal of success. Given one of them is a Chartered Surveyor, this feels like the minimum expectation. 			 			Nevertheless, despite the rise in physical activity (it's laying a patio specifically, not searching for someone to lay a patio for you), on Saturdays, some things stayed broadly the same...			 						 			...but we also also added a more social element, in lieu of being able to go out...			 						 			...though unfortunately, in film and in hygiene, American cultural hegemony remains: [3]			 						 			Education			Thankfully (especially given the above), education remained a serious consideration, particularly early on:			 						 			 			However, both those with primary and secondary age children alike struggled with certain aspects...			 						 						 			...with inevitable results...			 						 						 			Opportunities lost, opportunities gained...			 			Importantly, we quickly understood that the situation wasn't one we could get away from...			 						 			...and whilst some of us put off big decisions as a result...			 						 			...some of us saw an opportunity to improve our future.			 						 			Others, saw an opportunity to experience something...new. That said, it's heart-warming to see a handful (excuse the pun) of early adopters in January. 			 						 			Closing thoughts			Encouragingly, some of us started to realise what was important...			 						 			...and what, perhaps, wasn't.			 						 			But more people than ever, were asking the most important question of all:			 						 							 			Notes:			[1] I have absolutely no connection with Amazon aside from being a customer, but I think this is such a superb offer I've linked to it here: https://stories.audible.com/discovery/enterprise-discovery-21122353011?ref=adbl_ent_anon_ds_ds_dccs_sbtp-0-5			 			[2] It's important to note a couple of caveats here - the first being that this is purely data from Google, and whilst Google has a huge share of the search market, it isn't 100%. The other, is the charts above show relative figures on an index across a set time period (see X-axis for all charts) - they do not show volume per se and one chart is not comparable with another. Whilst Google says...			 			Google Trends does filter out some types of searches, such as:			 			bull; Searches made by very few people: Trends only shows data for popular terms, so search terms with low volume appear as "0"			 			...it does not provide figures around search volume - so we don't know whether the difference between a score of 100 vs. 25 is 100,000,000 vs. 25,000,000 or whether it is 100,000 vs. 25,000. That said, I'd argue the relative change is more interesting than the absolute change anyway.			 			If you want to understand a little more about Google Trends and the data it includes, there's a link here:			 			https://support.google.com/trends/answer/4365533?hl=en			 			[3] Very interested to know the cause of the August 2019 spike here...any thoughts?			 		 	Get more DJS News: 	Healthwatch publishes our research looking at young people's experiences of mental healthcare	 	For the Love of Scrubs: What I did with my DJS Volunteering Day...	 	When everyone is busy being objectively similar, try cultivating your subjective difference...
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Searching-for-meaning-a-tongue-in-cheek-look-at-trends-on-Trends
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					For the Love of Scrubs: What I did with my DJS Volunteering Day...
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											 			Written by Helen Menzies, Associate Director			 			When I joined DJS Research at the end of last year, as part of my induction I was informed about annual volunteer days. Every employee can take one paid day off work to help out a cause of their choice.  DJS has always supported local charities and our current 'charity of the year' is the Thomas Theyer Foundation ' although colleagues can support any cause they choose.			 			Before joining the company, I had seen photographs of charity walks, runs, climbs and sports matches on the website and social media pages.  I was certainly drawn to these charitable values and keen to work somewhere that is genuinely dedicated to giving back. Although, if I'm honest, I was a bit worried I'd have to sign up for a marathon!  			 			As it turned out, my new colleagues were doing all sorts of things for causes close to their hearts.  Some apply the skills they use at work, for example helping budding young entrepreneurs to learn about research and marketing, and others help out in the local community or charity shops. 			 			Naturally, in my first few months I had a lot to learn and new projects to get up to speed with. The volunteer day went to the back of my mind - something for the summer perhaps.  Then, in March, the world turned upside down. 			 			Suddenly, we were all working from home. Then into lockdown.  After a period of re-adjustment, I, like many of my colleagues and friends, started to think about what I could do to help.  Evidence of random acts of kindness, generosity and compassion was sweeping the nation amid tragic daily death totals on the news.  Rainbows started appearing in windows. We began clapping for carers every Thursday night. Thousands of people signed up to become NHS volunteers.  			 			I noticed on social media that some clothing companies, costume designers and home sewers (like me) had started to sew scrubs for the NHS.  With so many medical staff called upon to fight coronavirus on the front line, there was suddenly a need for thousands of pairs of scrubs. And quickly.  I looked into this further and found the Facebook campaign 'For the Love of Scrubs' had been set up to co-ordinate home sewers in producing scrubs for hospitals and GP surgeries all over the country.			 			As much as I love sewing (and I really do ' I have taken over an entire room in our house with boxes of fabric), working in a busy research agency and racing around after a boisterous toddler doesn't leave me with much time for my favourite hobby these days.  But then I remembered ' the volunteer day! Knowing that I could take a day out of work specifically dedicated to this lifted the time barrier and gave me the push I needed to get involved.  			 						 			I contacted the co-ordinator in my area to check what supplies I needed and ordered the correct fabric.  Pattern designer Sew Different made a scrubs pattern available for free download and many online fabric shops are prioritising orders for scrubs fabric.  Fundraising campaigns were started to help those who wanted to help but couldn't afford the fabric. Yet another example of people coming together in a time of crisis with their time, money and support. 			 			Can you make a difference in a day?  Well, I like to think so. I'm certainly not expecting a round of applause on Thursday night because I did some sewing, but the GP who received the scrubs I made knows they were made with love and when she puts them on I hope she is reminded that we are all so grateful for the fact she, like so many other front line staff, is going to work today.  			 			Ultimately, thinking beyond the specific task we complete on our volunteer day, it is about what we stand for as a company and the values we promote. Enabling us to take one day out of our working life can lead to something much bigger.  People make connections with their community and start to volunteer on a longer-term basis, outside of work. We can also learn new skills, meet new people and build self-confidence ' all things that can benefit us personally both in and outside the workplace.  You could say that the volunteer days are just the start ' they are there to nudge us in the right direction, a bit like the free fruit in the office. 			 			I hope the humanitarian spirit I have witnessed in my local area and all over the country will continue when life gets back to 'normal', but I know it will at DJS. 			 			Watch the clip:			 			  
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/For-the-Love-of-Scrubs-What-I-did-with-my-DJS-Volunteering-Day
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					Why are we so bad at social distancing?
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Why-are-we-so-bad-at-social-distancing
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Why-are-we-so-bad-at-social-distancing
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					When everyone is busy being objectively similar, try cultivating your subjective difference...
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/When-everyone-is-busy-being-objectively-similar-try-cultivating-your-subjective-difference
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