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			<title>Market Research RSS Feeds</title>
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			<description>Market Research RSS Feeds</description>
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					Gen Z are a driving force in the current retail evolution climate
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								Written by Gill Redfern, Research Director. Contact Gill here
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Gen-Z-are-a-driving-force-in-the-current-retail-evolution-climate
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Gen-Z-are-a-driving-force-in-the-current-retail-evolution-climate
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					Calling Researchers With Experience Of Working Within The Culture Sector - We Are Recruiting!
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					                                                                                        Our culture team currently works with a wide variety of cultural and commercial visitor attractions, supporting them in understanding who their audiences are and using research to develop strategic plans. This includes us carrying out one of the largest research projects for a number of leading museums and galleries and lots of other exciting projects for culture and heritage clients.                                    We are looking for researchers, ideally Research Managers, but other levels may also be considered, with experience of working in the culture sector; all-rounders, experienced, with both qualitative and quantitative skills, looking for a challenge and comfortable with working within a fast-paced and growing environment.                                    If you are interested, please send us your details: Culture Market Research Job                                                             		Get more DJS News:             Calling Researchers With Experience Of Working Within The Culture Sector - We Are Recruiting!                         DJS Research Joins BBC Market Research Framework                         Fast Fashion: can it work without harming our planet?    
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Calling-Researchers-With-Experience-Of-Working-Within-The-Culture-Sector-We-Are-Recruiting
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Calling-Researchers-With-Experience-Of-Working-Within-The-Culture-Sector-We-Are-Recruiting
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					DJS Research Joins BBC Market Research Framework
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Joins-BBC-Market-Research-Framework
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Joins-BBC-Market-Research-Framework
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					Fast Fashion: can it work without harming our planet?
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Fast-Fashion-can-it-work-without-harming-our-planet
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Fast-Fashion-can-it-work-without-harming-our-planet
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					Will environmental consciousness change the direction of travel for delivery services in the UK?
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Will-environmental-consciousness-change-the-direction-of-travel-for-delivery-services-in-the-UK
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Will-environmental-consciousness-change-the-direction-of-travel-for-delivery-services-in-the-UK
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					Evolutionary Dear Consumer: The Future Face of Customer Loyalty
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Evolutionary-Dear-Consumer-The-Future-Face-of-Customer-Loyalty
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Evolutionary-Dear-Consumer-The-Future-Face-of-Customer-Loyalty
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					Mixed consumer confidence for the year ahead as Brexit looms
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Mixed-consumer-confidence-for-the-year-ahead-as-Brexit-looms
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Mixed-consumer-confidence-for-the-year-ahead-as-Brexit-looms
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					DJS Research Ltd wins top UK contract for Cultural Market Research
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							We are thrilled to announce that DJS Research has been awarded one of the biggest contracts for cultural market research in the UK. Over the next four years, we will be working alongside some of the nation's leading museums and cultural venues to deliver transformative insight.  	 	We were awarded the sought-after contract following an extensive review and selection process which saw our researchers pitch to a prestigious consortium of 18 museums and cultural venues including The British Museum, National History Museum, Tate and VA (you can see the full list below).	 	The contract will see us conduct audience research for the consortium at sites across London as well as Manchester, Liverpool and St. Ives. 	 				Not only will our research help the consortium identify opportunities to further engage visitors, it will also help them navigate some of the wider challenges facing the cultural sector. 
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Ltd-wins-top-UK-contract-for-Cultural-Market-Research
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Ltd-wins-top-UK-contract-for-Cultural-Market-Research
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					Another Year Over: DJS Research Annual Review - 2018
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				<description>
						
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Another-Year-Over-DJS-Research-Annual-Review-2018
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Another-Year-Over-DJS-Research-Annual-Review-2018
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					DJS Research Get Up and Go this January for the Thomas Theyer Foundation
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				<description>
								
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Get-Up-and-Go-this-January-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-Get-Up-and-Go-this-January-for-the-Thomas-Theyer-Foundation
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					Back of the net for DJS Research -  Winners at Football Business Awards 2018
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								Huge celebrations are in order for DJS Research and Leicester City Football Club who together have scooped the award for The Best Fan Engagement Programme at the Football Business Awards 2018.
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Back-of-the-net-for-DJS-Research-Winners-at-Football-Business-Awards-2018
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Back-of-the-net-for-DJS-Research-Winners-at-Football-Business-Awards-2018
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					DJS Senior Research Manager first ever alumna to be invited to tutor at Research Academy
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Senior-Research-Manager-first-ever-alumna-to-be-invited-to-tutor-at-Research-Academy
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Senior-Research-Manager-first-ever-alumna-to-be-invited-to-tutor-at-Research-Academy
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					Market Research Jobs at DJS Research – check out our latest exciting roles!
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						Want to further your career in Market Research? Fancy being part of a dynamic, forward-thinking, creative and (most of all) fun team? You're in luck as we're currently recruiting! We have a number of exciting opportunities at both our Stockport and new Leeds offices. 	 	Come grow with us ' a rewarding career at DJS Research	 	Since first opening our doors back in 2001 in Stockport, Cheshire, DJS Research has continued its year-on-year growth ' and we're now one of the leading market research agencies in the North West. We've also been named as 'One to Watch' by The Market Research Society in its Research Live Industry Report. 	 	Just last year we opened a second office (as we were getting pretty full in Stockport!) ' just over the Pennines in lovely Leeds. Our sister office will give us the space needed to continue our company expansion as well as continue to attract some of the hottest talent in the country.	 	'It's a really exciting time to join DJS Research', said Managing Director, Danny Sims. 'The new Leeds office means we can continue our company growth and offer clients a fantastic market research package with some of the top researchers in the industry.'  	 	Fancy knowing a little more? We're currently looking for talented researchers to join our friendly team. 		Market Research Jobs in Leeds and Stockport	 	Whether you're a budding researcher looking for a new challenge or a telephone interviewer with a talent for getting the best from respondents - we want to hear from you! Current job opportunities include Data Executive, Field Executive and Senior Field Executive, Researchers at various levels and Telephone Interviewers ' many of which are available at our Leeds or Stockport offices. 	 	If you have a passion for research and want to take the next step in your career, take a look at our current market research jobs and drop us a line! 	 			Get more DJS News: 			DJS Research nominated at the Sports Business Awards 2018 - alongside Leicester City FC!			 			Rise of the machines: Adopting AI and its impact on skills in the research industry			 			Jenna Allen, Research Director, joins DJS Research
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				<link>
					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Market-Research-Jobs-at-DJS-Research-check-out-our-latest-exciting-roles
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Market-Research-Jobs-at-DJS-Research-check-out-our-latest-exciting-roles
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					Some learnings from one of this year's Behavioural Science-based Beesley Lectures
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											Written by Alex McCluckie, Associate Director. Contact Alex here			 						Nudging the water sector towards a brighter future?			Behavioural science and the water sector are two, once disparate areas, that are slowly becoming better acquainted with each other. Given the great impact that behavioural science has been having over the past few years (as evidenced by the Behavioural Insights Team or 'Nudge Unit'), this article's first sentence I would hope will be encouraging to many that work in the industry. To try and investigate further how behavioural science could be leveraged for the good of the water sector, on Wednesday the 10th of October, I jetted off from Manchester down to the Institute of Directors in London to attend one of this year's Beesley Lectures, succinctly titled: Behavioural science in water and energy markets: lessons for evidence-based policy making. 			 			The night was chaired by Dr Xeni Dassiou of City, University of London with the star attraction being a lecture given by Professor Robert Hahn from the University of Oxford. 			 			As appears to be customary at the conferences and speaking events I have attended of late, the session began with a quick overview of behavioural economics and its Nobel-winning popularisers, Kahneman and Thaler. After bringing everyone up to speed, however, Professor Hahn jumped straight into some meaty examples of nudges using real-world examples and demonstrated how insights from this exciting sphere have been harnessed across numerous areas within both water and energy.			 			Whilst it wasn't an all-encompassing overview of what can influence behaviour, part of the session did provide an interesting examination of some of the ways that Hahn's own field experiments have been altering behaviour, with the key tenet for this portion of the talk being that information matters! Indeed, as I have seen from my own work in the water industry, from asking customers about how acceptable they deem their water company's proposed plans for the next five years to be, to their willingness to support a social tariff, how information is framed can make such a difference. Let's take a look at some of Professor Hahn's examples...			 			Some work undertaken on behalf of British Gas that sought to understand how best to get people to take up smart meters provided support for the view that neoclassical economics doesn't always ring true. In this example, the researchers offered a randomly selected group of people a £5 voucher and a second randomly selected group of people a £10 voucher to take up a smart meter. Now firstly, it should be noted that these two monetary incentives resulted in a difference compared to the baseline (that is to say that the offer of a cash incentive did increase people's likelihood to take up smart meters) - nothing overly surprising there I hear you say! What was interesting however was the finding that there was absolutely no difference between the amount of take up between the two amounts, something that is contradictory to what classical economics would teach us; that we should expect more people to take up smart meters with the higher incentive. Now, why is this first snippet of information interesting? Well, imagine you are the operations manager for your water or energy company who yourself is attempting to increase the uptake of smart meters. Falsely assuming that doubling the monetary incentive would double (or at least relatively increase) the take up of meters would lead to a tremendous waste of money that could otherwise be put to great use elsewhere in the business! Can you think of a better example of why experimentation when planning an intervention is crucial?!			 			I should make clear, behavioural science isn't about throwing money at problems. It is about recognising that there are a number of mental biases that human beings tend to succumb to and that these biases can be utilised. One such way of doing this is by presenting people with information that is framed in ways that play on these biases.			 			For clarity's sake, let's take a closer look at two of these now:			 			bull; Loss aversion: is the principle that people react to losses more strongly than gains and they try to prevent losses more than they try to make gains.			 			bull; Social norms: is the principle that people want to be like everyone else and are heavily influenced by what they perceive everyone else is doing. 			 			These two biases have been utilised to influence people to behave in different ways across a range of sectors and industries and here Hahn demonstrated their power in the water sector specifically. 			 			The City of San Antonio, Texas wanted to motivate people to take up rebates for drought-resistant landscaping. To do this, they sent out letters that were framed in different ways but which utilised the aforementioned biases. For instance, asking people to take up an offer of drought-resistant landscaping because they are using more water than their neighbours uses a social norm frame which is different to asking people to take up an offer of drought-resistant landscaping because if they don't, they will lose this offer and by the way this is what your neighbours are doing in terms of consumption, which uses both the social norm frame and the loss frame. Interestingly, the combination of a social comparison and loss framing led to a 36% increase in take up of the offer relative to a benchmark letter that had neither framing effect applied!  Now there are a whole host of other fascinating titbits from this study that time and space restraints won't let me dive into here, such as how social norms alone may play better in some domains whilst loss frames alone may play better in others. However, I have included a link to the article here and I urge you to follow this up because it makes for some really interesting reading.			 			So what is the point here? Well, on the one hand, there is the fact that we know there are certain interventions that can lead to changes in people's behaviour and that the recognition and utilisation of various mental biases can help facilitate such changes. However, I think there is a broader point here and that is that experimentation and evaluation are key. Notice that the two examples I detail above each had a control plus various experimentation groups which due to the randomised design adopted allowed for a direct comparison of cause and effect that otherwise would have been lost. If you're thinking this is something of a 'stating the obvious' type of moment, then spare a thought for California... 			 			In 2015 California was in the sways of a worrying drought. So much so in fact that the Governor, in an attempt to sort this problem out, set about trying to achieve a 25% reduction in water usage by, amongst other costly things, adopting a turf removal programme. Now, these initiatives resulted in the Governor largely meeting his goal, however, there was a problem; there was almost no evaluation or experimentation of the effectiveness of these various programmes undertaken. What this meant was that they were effectively blind as to what worked best and what would work best should a new crisis/drought strike. As Hahn pointed out, it seems that this episode holds true to the phrase coined by Stanford economist Paul Romer: a crisis is a terrible thing to waste! 			 			So, have we found a solution to the myriad issues currently facing the industry?			 			Through experimentation and evaluation, can we slowly begin to form a perfect industry operating in the most efficient and optimum way imaginable? Really, the answer is no, at least not yet. It has been recognised for some time that different nudges work on different margins (although why this is the case is something that we're still trying to learn more about). The truth is, there is no complete theory of human decision making, but we are developing a toolkit that is growing stronger with time. 			 			Indeed, I am conscious that this article thus far has been relatively glowing about behavioural science's possibilities and I feel that in the name of balance it is only right to cover some of the gripes brought to the fore by the audience too. In fact, given the buzz that often follows any discussion of behavioural science and its potential impact, it was interesting to hear a couple of audience members question its usage given that its effects are often quoted as delivering relatively small percentage changes in whatever the target behaviour may be. This even led to a discussion around whether or not behavioural science's effects are at times oversold. Well, as Alex Plant of Anglian Water pointed out, small effects across a large population are probably still worth having and given that running such experimentation to establish how these small effects can best be brought about through skilfully crafted nudges is relatively inexpensive, they can still be well worth the effort.			 			Alex, in his role as respondent for the night's discussion, did provide a well thought through response to Professor Hahn's talk in which he held strong to the belief that we maybe shouldn't be drawn moth-like to the shimmering flame of behavioural science at the expense of traditional economics altogether. Rather, he claimed, we should think about those key tenets of competition regulation theory that have served us well in the past as, he claims, companies will still tend to act in economically rational ways. Policies that recognise this along with incentive-based regulation will still drive efficiency and can drive innovation in ways that deliver for all customers regardless of underpinning sub-optimum choices that may be being made by customers at the individual level.			 			And so to conclude, born out of a realisation that neoclassical economics needed a fundamental re-think, behavioural science does offer insights into how people can be nudged into behaving in ways that are 'good', however that may be defined, whether that be for themselves, the environment or society. 			 			It is well recognised that nudges have been working well in numerous areas of society and I see there to be no reason why behavioural science, if deployed effectively cannot play a really important role in promoting outcomes that are in the public interest in the water (and energy) industry. 			 			Indeed, as we are faced with the growing challenges of population growth and climate change, the fundamentals of evidenced-based policy are only going to increase, in both their appeal and their importance from initial diagnosis, to experimenting with RCTs and studying your outcomes through adequate evaluation and then looping back round to diagnosis. So, whilst no panacea, armed with the growing learnings from behavioural science, we are certainly entering into an incredibly exciting time within the industry of which we are only just beginning to scratch the surface of what seems, at least for now, to be vast possibilities. 			 			 			 	Get more DJS News: 	It was the best of climbs, it was the worst of climbs: A Tale of Three Peaks	 	Research Executives to complete Market Research Society Advanced Certificate	 	DJS Research proud to announce new Charity of the Year
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Some-learnings-from-one-of-this-years-Behavioural-Science-based-Beesley-Lectures
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					It was the best of climbs, it was the worst of climbs: A Tale of Three Peaks
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											By James Hinde, Research Director, email: jhinde@djsresearch.com			DJS walk the Yorkshire Three Peaks to raise money for the Thomas Theyer foundation...
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/It-was-the-best-of-climbs-it-was-the-worst-of-climbs-A-Tale-of-Three-Peaks
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/It-was-the-best-of-climbs-it-was-the-worst-of-climbs-A-Tale-of-Three-Peaks
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					Research Executives to complete Market Research Society Advanced Certificate
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												As a company, we always seek to invest in our staff to help them gain new skills, learn more about the industry and help them on their journey to further developing their market research careers. 			 			We have recently enrolled six of our Research Executives and Junior Research Executives on the MRS Advanced Certificate course with the Research Academy to develop their knowledge of market research and gain a solid grounding in research methods and practice as well as working towards an industry recognised degree-level vocational qualification. 			 			The course, which takes up to six months to complete, will ensure they receive the very best training to the highest MRS standard. And as they complete it alongside their daily DJS role, they can begin to apply the theory being taught to real-life situations encountered in the workplace.			 						 			Learning with The Research Academy 			 			DJS has chosen to use the Research Academy to help our researchers gain their new qualifications because of its passion for research and teaching and also at the recommendation of our Senior Research Manager, Rebecca Green, who is a Research Academy tutor for the post-grad diploma. 			 			Rebecca, who joined DJS Research in June was awarded the MRS Diploma in 2017 and impressed her Research Academy tutors so much, was invited shortly after to switch sides and help others undertaking the course. 			 			She believes enrolling Research Execs on the Advanced Certificate course will enable them to go far beyond mere technical learning, exposing them to a range of industry experts and enabling them to help each other throughout their learning journey.  						"I think it's great that DJS is committing themselves to a course like this," she said.   
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Research-Executives-to-complete-Market-Research-Society-Advanced-Certificate
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/Research-Executives-to-complete-Market-Research-Society-Advanced-Certificate
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					DJS Research proud to announce new Charity of the Year
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												Following our recent charity of the year review, DJS Research is happy to announce that we will be supporting our new charity, the Thomas Theyer Foundation. 			 			A local charity, based in Buxton, the Thomas Theyer Foundation supports children and young people with additional needs or living in difficult life circumstances by giving them the opportunity to enjoy and benefit from outdoor activity breaks.			 			At DJS we strive to support as many local, national and international charities during our time at work, by participating in a variety of events. From voluntary days to fundraising events, the DJS team are always keen to get involved, and on 23rd September, a group of us will be taking part in the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge. This involves a 24.5 mile hike and more than 2,000 metres of climbing over Pen-y-Ghent, Whernside and Ingleborough -- and all within 12 hours! 			 			We're prepared to push ourselves both physically and mentally in order to raise awareness and money for the services that the Thomas Theyer Foundation offers.			 			One of our researchers, Alex Noden, gave her thoughts on the importance of our new charity:			 			"The Thomas Theyer Foundation is a local charity which supports children and young people with additional needs, and their families and carers, allowing them the opportunity to enjoy and explore the outdoors," she said. "Many of us here at DJS Research enjoy running, cycling, walking and other outdoor activities, and we are thrilled to support a local charity that provides that opportunity, and other outdoor opportunities, to those who are in difficult circumstances.  The first challenge is taking place in just a couple of weeks, and I'm sure there will be further fundraising opportunities over the next 12 months.  We look forward to supporting the Thomas Theyer Foundation through these activities!"			 			To help support our charity event, please visit and share our fundraising page: 			 			You can also follow our journey on Facebook where we'll post regular updates in the run-up to the Yorkshire Three Peaks Challenge.			 			Wish us luck! 	 	 	Get more DJS News: 	DJS Research in the national press: Water Matters survey makes a splash	 	A week in the life of a work experience student at DJS Research...	 	The water retail market turned one! Time to think about this fledgeling's future...
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-proud-to-announce-new-Charity-of-the-Year
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					A week in the life of a work experience student at DJS Research...
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							If you're looking for a work placement or a longer internship, DJS Research offers the chance to learn some new skills and get a feel for the market research industry in an exciting, friendly environment...	 	So what exactly do we offer?	 	Although there's no denying we love a good brew (who doesn't!), finding out who takes sugar and who likes their caffeine boost milk-free will not be high on your daily agenda; we've far too many other exciting opportunities for you to get involved in!	 	From working with our creative team and writing news insights to learning about the financial elements of the business and assisting researchers - we want you to have the chance to learn new skills and experience all that a dynamic market research agency has to offer. 				We've just spent a brilliant week with A-level student Nikki, who had the opportunity to work with a number of DJS staff to find out more about the inner-workings of a market research agency and work with us on some exciting projects, including learning to make an animation using digital software with our creative team. 
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/A-week-in-the-life-of-a-work-experience-student-at-DJS-Research
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/A-week-in-the-life-of-a-work-experience-student-at-DJS-Research
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					As PR19 customer engagement draws to a close, our reflections
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								Written by Alex McCluckie, Associate Director. Email Alex here
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/As-PR19-customer-engagement-draws-to-a-close-our-reflections
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/As-PR19-customer-engagement-draws-to-a-close-our-reflections
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					DJS Research in the national press: Water Matters survey makes a splash
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								A major piece of research conducted by DJS Research for the Consumer Council for Water (CCWater) has recently been a national talking point, featuring on a number of prominent radio and TV programmes. 			 			The Water Matters research sheds light on how the water services industry compares with other service sectors and focusses on the views that customers have in relation to fairness and value for money. 			 			It surveyed 5110 water-bill payers across England and Wales and covered a variety of topics including satisfaction with water services, sewerage services, company contact and bills.			 			The annual study found 92% of customers are satisfied overall with the service they receive (water services) and 88% are satisfied with their sewerage service. And while almost three-quarters agree that their water bills are affordable, perceptions of fairness are much lower, with 61% agreeing charges are fair. These views, say Water Matters, are strongly shaped by customer experience. 			 			 						 			For example, the customers who feel that charges are unfair are more likely to have contacted their water company in the last twelve months and are less likely to believe their water provider cares about them as a customer as well as being less likely to recommend them. 			 			The survey also found that while customers views in many areas have stayed broadly the same over the past 7 years, the perceptions they have around fairness are out of kilter with opinion in other areas.  			 			The Water Matters report recommends that water companies should work to bring views on fairness in line with satisfaction in other areas. Speaking on Wake Up to Money on Radio 5 Live, Tony Smith, Chief Executive of the Consumer Council for Water said: 			 			"Although 9 out of 10 customers like services they are getting, there is a big problem with customers' views about the fairness of the bills they are paying - that's about price rises, service issues, profits.' 			 			Responding to CC Water's Water Matters report, Water UK Chief Executive, Michael Roberts, said:			 			"Thanks to £150 billion of investment by water companies since the 1990s, customer satisfaction with water and sewerage services remains very high. However, we fully recognise that there is still more to do on other issues. Average bills are currently around £1 a day and have remained roughly the same for the last 20 years in real terms; while 6 out of 10 people see that as good value for money, we are determined to improve on that."			 			 			You can find highlights of the Water Matters report here, or access the full version	Get more DJS News: 	The water retail market turned one! Time to think about this fledgeling's future....	 	The reason for B2Being: David Marchant attends the B2B Research Conference in London	 	As PR19 customer engagement draws to a close, our reflections
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					http://www.djsresearch.co.uk/news/article/DJS-Research-in-the-national-press-Water-Matters-survey-makes-a-splash
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