Survey Reveals Most Common Car Brands Chosen By Cheating Spouses

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22nd June 2012 12:18 - Automotive

A survey by “extra-marital” dating site IllicitEncounters.com has uncovered the cars most favoured by cheating spouses.

The 640,000 UK members of the cheeky site were polled, with the result that BMW’s have been exposed as the number one car driven by husbands and wives with a roving eye.  Cheating husbands are twice as likely to drive a BMW than any other car brand at 19.21%, and naughty wives also opt for BMWs most at 11.16%.

The second most popular car amongst straying husbands is the Audi brand, which is driven by 8.79% of those registered with IllicitEncounters.com.

Mercedes ranked third place at 8.23%, followed by Jaguar (6.59%) and Land Rover (4.94%) to round out the top five.

The poll also revealed the car brands least favoured by adulterers – those looking for a faithful partner will have the best luck with people who drive SEATs or Renaults (0.28%), followed by MGs (0.53%) and Fiats or Chryslers (0.55%).

Illicit Encounters spokesperson Rosie Freeman-Jones commented on the reasoning behind the findings: “There is an intrinsic link between success and cheating. Successful people are often risk-takers, and have got to where they are by setting their standards high. However, these people are also less likely to settle for unsatisfying relationships or monotony. With this in mind, the fact that BMWs are the choice car of our users really doesn’t surprise me. Our membership demographic is typically middle-class, high-earning and high-achieving.” 

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