Market Research Survey of Primary School Parents Shows A Quarter Pay For Holiday Tutoring

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30th July 2013 12:15 - Education

 

New education market research finds that more than a quarter (27%) of primary school parents plan to hire tutors for their children in order to insure against a ‘summer-slide’ in academic ability. The survey, which looked at the views of 1000 parents with children in primary schools, found that a fifth of respondents hired tutors so that their child could be ‘top of the class’.

For a long time, research has shown that children’s academic ability drops off over the summer break – and this is particularly the case if they are not engaging in learning and skills development during the period. For instance, students typically do worse in tests at the end of the summer break than they do in the same tests at the beginning of the holiday period. However, the survey, carried out by www.themathsfactor.com, suggests around a third of parents are unaware of this trend.

Still, most parents were planning to undertake some form of learning activity with their children during the break – including reading books (29%), utilising literacy and numeracy apps (14%), revision for SATS (8%) and online courses to aid mental activity (7%).

However, Dr Mary Bousted, general secretary for the Association of Teachers and Lecturers (ATL) stated:

Children need a break from learning pressure and time to play – which is itself educational.

In reference to tutoring, she said that parents should not feel they need to utilise‘unnecessary services.’

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