Survey Finds Career Women Face Numerous Glass Ceilings

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23rd August 2012 15:04 - Professional Services

According to a new survey of 1,000 working women in the UK between the ages of 18 to 60 by professional services firm Ernst & Young, women are facing not just one but several barriers in terms of reaching boardroom level in their careers.

Two thirds of the surveyants believed that there were multiple glass ceilings when it comes to securing top jobs.

The study findings identified four main barriers to career progression for Britain’s working women - age, lack of role models, motherhood and qualifications or experience – with sometimes more than one affecting them at any one time.

Respondents revealed that the age factor (being too young or too old) is the biggest obstacle to the glass ceiling – younger women were most severely impacted by this since half of the surveyants between 18 and 23 said they has already encountered this prejudice in their career.

The research found that the second biggest limitation career women face relates to a lack of experience or qualifications, as 22% of respondents had encountered this issue.

Furthermore, nearly one in five of those questioned claimed becoming a mother had caused a negative impact on their career progression.

Harry Gaskell, Ernst & Young’s Head of Advisory, commented: “Gender diversity transcends the responsibility of government, business and individuals. There is no quick fix or magic bullet. It will take a combined effort, but the focus has to be on the talent pipeline...”

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