Half of drivers admit their road knowledge is poor, reveals survey

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25th October 2018 13:41 - Automotive

Half of drivers admit their road knowledge is poor: A survey of drivers by road safety charity IAM RoadSmart has found over half consider their road knowledge poor – with 50% being unable to identify a roundabout sign. 
 
The poll of 1,000 sought to find out how clued up motorists are on the Highway Code - road rules intended to keep the drivers and pedestrian's safe. 
 
More than two thirds (68%) had no understanding of ‘the two-second rule’ when it comes to driving in dry weather, with over half (53%) confusing it with remaining two car lengths behind a vehicle
 
Other signs that were not recognised were ‘dual carriageway ends’ with 43% being unable to identify the triangular sign depicting two roads merging into one.  Of all the age groups to get this wrong, drivers aged 17-39 were the most in the dark. 
 
Half of the drivers polled did not know that a circle sign indicated one that gave instruction and 48% did not know that the first thing they should do when arriving at the scene of an accident is to turn hazard lights on to warn others that danger is ahead. 
 
Another area where knowledge was lacking was understanding the colour of the (green) reflective markers separating a motorway and slip road – two-thirds were unable to answer. 
 
 IAM RoadSmart director, Neil Greig, said: “This is truly shocking. The outcome of the survey brings to light some frightening statistics which demonstrates the need to constantly re-fresh on-road knowledge.”


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