Survey reveals charities most likely to receive legacy gift from supporters

About The Authors

21st November 2018 17:22 - Voluntary

Survey reveals charities most likely to receive legacy gift from supporters: A survey polling charity supporters (age 50+) over the course of the last year has revealed the top 20 organisations likely to benefit from legacy gifts. 
 
The Legacy Potential Premier League Table 2018/19 carried out by fastmap, asked 10,000 respondents about the charities they would consider leaving or have already offered a legacy donation to - with the top 20 for legacy consideration winning a place in the league table.
 
The table seeks to show which organisations have the largest opportunity for legacy gifts and how their competitors match up. Placement also take into consideration other factors such as motivations to make a bequest, the scale of the support the charity has, as well as barriers to support.
 
Animal charities at the top of the table
 
Animal charities took the four top league places with the premier spot going to Cats Protection, closely followed by Battersea. The Dogs Trust and the RSPCA were placed in third and fourth positions, respectively.
 
In fifth place was Cancer Research UK followed by the RNLI (sixth), MacMillan Cancer Support (seventh) and the NSPCC in eighth position.
 
The Woodland Trust and Help for Heroes took the final two places inside the top ten (9th and 10th respectively). 
 
The survey also revealed of those charities in the league table, the NSPCC had the most barriers to leaving a legacy gift, according to those polled. 


Sign up for free insights from your sector…

Antispam code: 14470

Support Us..

We hope that you have found this article useful. This section is freely available for all to use. Please help support it by liking us or following us on our social media platforms:

Share this article..


For updated Voluntary insights please follow us on @DJS_Voluntary or use our RSS feed

Other Voluntary Research Findings

Other Latest Market Research Insights

© DJS Research 2019