56% of British engineers have received an increase in pay over the last year, survey reveals

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31st March 2022 11:30 - Engineering

56% of British engineers have received an increase in pay over the last year: A recent survey into the engineering sector has uncovered that 56% of UK-based engineers have received a wage increase in the last 12 months, increasing the average salary by over 2% on last year’s figures to £58,108.
 
The study by The Engineer polled nearly 800 permanent and part-time engineers from a range of sectors to illicit trends within the engineering industry. The research also found that food and drink (consumer goods) engineers were the least content with their salary; however, three quarters (74%) said they could see themselves in the same job in five years.
 
When asked about how happy they were with their current line of work, 42% of engineers said they would consider a career change. In addition, 51% of oil and gas engineers said they would consider leaving the industry, with defence and security (49%) just behind.
 
On the other hand, the research found that many people enjoy their chosen career, with 75% of material engineers stating they are happy in the role they have. Furthermore 67% of apprentice engineers said they enjoyed their job; despite being paid the least out of all the sub-sectors.
 
In addition, the sub-sector with the highest average wage was energy/renewable/nuclear engineers with a salary of almost £63,000 per annum. Despite this, just over four in 10 energy/renewable/nuclear engineers are content with the amount of money they are getting. 
 
When asked if they feel valued in their role or not, 61% of apprentice engineers said they do not; with more material engineers feeling as if they are valued (54%).
 
Robert Harper, managing director of CBSbutler, said: “We are noticing a spike in the number of vacancies being advertised, and whilst there is also an increase in the number of engineers looking for new roles (be that permanent or contract), that increase is not sufficient to fill all the new vacancies.  We are in the midst of a skills shortage.”


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