Market Research Reveals What Britons Worry About Most

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9th November 2012 16:31 - Financial Services

 

A continent-wide survey by insurance provider Zurich has shown that Britons top the European league for worrying about money and household bills.

In comparison, the main worry for the European surveyants was the Euro issue. Meanwhile, the second biggest concern amongst UK respondents was family and children issues, followed by noisy neighbours.

Although the UK surveyants also said that their top fear, superseding money worries, is related to illness (57%) or the death of a loved one (62%), the interesting and contradictory finding was that they also voted insuring their car and home as being more important than life and protection cover.

When questioned what types of insurance they prioritise, 83% of Britons said that household insurance was the most essential, followed by car insurance (76%). Life insurance came a distant third at 54%, not far above travel insurance at 35%.

Finally, when asked to describe the life values they'd most like to insure, 63% chose "steady health for myself and my family", 52% would opt for financial security and just under half (46%) voted for happiness.

Chief Marketing Officer for General Insurance at Zurich UK, Kay Martin, commented: "It's interesting to see the differences between what Britons say they value, and what they insure. Although they believe the biggest risks they face are illness and losing a loved one, they put life insurance in only third place in the list of insurance priorities."

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