Poll Highlights Public Rejection of Government Handling UK Press Regulation

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1st May 2013 16:38 - Public Consultation

 

Following the newspaper industry recently rejecting the proposed Royal Charter which would see the Government predominantly overseeing regulation of the media, a new opinion poll by Survation has gauged the UK public’s attitude on the issue.

The majority of Britons at 67% felt that politicians should not have the final say on press regulation compared to 12% who support denying the public any sway on the matter.

Furthermore, 76% of those polled said they would like to be consulted on the structure of the regulatory Royal Charter, and only 16% support politicians having the final say if any changes need to be made in the future.

The newspaper industry published its own proposal for regulation, titled the Independent Royal Charter. This would entail the creation of a stringent independent system of self-regulation.

This is supported by another poll finding - the majority of the UK public at 54% want a new, more effective system of press regulation implemented as soon as possible, which will only be possible with the Independent Charter.

Editor of the East Anglian Daily Times, Terry Hunt, commented: “It is an Independent Royal Charter which will guarantee Britain remains the home of free speech… Politicians must accept this compromise solution or they will be culpable in threatening a regional press which millions of people rely on for news that is clear, truthful and unhindered by vested interests.”

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